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Baltimore County News

Stay informed of what's happening in Baltimore County.

County building 15 new schools, 11 additions, 8 renovations, 90 air conditioning projects

Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz and Baltimore County Public School Superintendent Dr. Dallas Dance updated members of the County’s house and senate delegations in Annapolis on the progress of the County’s $1.3 billion Schools for our Future program. The program, begun in 2011, will provide 15 new schools, 11 additions, 8 major renovations, and 90 central air conditioning projects.  This fall, only 13 schools remain without central air; of those, 6 will be newly constructed replacement schools. 

“When I was elected in 2010, our school infrastructure was in sad state, with 80% of our schools more than 40 years old,” said County Executive Kamenetz.  “Ninety schools did not have air conditioning, we had severe overcrowding at the elementary school level, and our schools needed serious technology and security upgrades.  With Superintendent Dance, BCPS stakeholders, and our county council and state legislators, we devised the $1.3 billion Schools for our Future program to solve the problem.  No county in the history of this state has ever invested more money for school construction in such a short period of time.  We are particularly pleased that we are able to install central air conditioning in the same amount of time that it would have taken to install portable air, with no increase in the tax rates, which is a real testament to the Baltimore County way of operating government.”

“I am delighted to report that all of our projects are moving forward,” said Dr. Dance. “I arrived in the County five years ago, and I immediately recognized that we had serious infrastructure issues. Working with the County Executive, County Council, Board of Education, and our state delegation, we have made historic progress, and the real beneficiaries of that effort are our students, teachers, and administrators who work in these buildings every day.”


By Taylor Butler, Towson High School Senior and Baltimore County Office of Communications Intern 

People share their dreams in many ways. The dream Dr. King had was to bring tranquility to his fellow man with hope and peace. I feel the world will be eternally grateful for Dr. King. His vison and courage helped pave the way for many people, including myself.

Dr. King's dream has helped open my eyes to see the world from a different perspective.

By putting the best foot forward, I have gained well-valued experiences, created new connections and am able to better visualize myself in my "ideal career." After high school I plan to attend college to study broadcast journalism. Broadcast journalists present their stories to a wide audience. With the help of watching Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., a strong and confident man who not only spoke his dream to the members of his church, but to the world, I will one day build the confidence to present my stories to the world. I hope to be half the person he was.

Happy Birthday to the man who brought America closer. May his dream live on.  #ThankYouMLK


Baltimore County seeking to enroll residents in a national program

The Baltimore County Department of Health recently received a grant to enroll people with prediabetes in the National Diabetes Prevention Program (NDPP), an evidence-based lifestyle change program. The NDPP in Baltimore County is offering free seminars to help those with prediabetes and at risk for developing type 2 diabetes.

One in three adults have prediabetes and most are unaware of their condition. Prediabetes means a person has a blood glucose (blood sugar) level higher than normal, but not high enough to be considered diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes, and it is preventable. People with prediabetes may delay the onset of type 2 diabetes and possibly return their blood glucose levels to normal by participating in this free program.

The NDPP in Baltimore County meets in a small group for just one hour every week for 16 weeks. A trained lifestyle coach leads the weekly sessions to help participants improve food choices, increase physical activity, and learn coping skills to maintain weight loss and healthy lifestyle changes. The goal of the NDPP is to have participants eat healthy, be more active, and lose body weight and keep it off.

You may be eligible for the Diabetes Prevention Program if you have a Body Mass Index (BMI) of at least 24, and have been told by a doctor you have prediabetes, or score 9 or higher on the diabetes risk test. Take the prediabetes risk test online at www.cdc.gov/diabetes/prevention. Free seminars to learn about the NDPP in Baltimore County will be offered at the following locations:

Drumcastle Government Center

6401 York Road, 21212 Third Floor Conference Room

Thursday, January 26, noon to 1 PM

Tuesday, February 21, noon to 1 PM

 

Eastern Family Resource Center

9100 Franklin Square Drive, 21237 Room 101A

Tuesday, February 7, noon to 1 PM

 

Owings Mills Campus

10225 Jensen Lane, 21117 Room 118

Thursday, February 9, noon to 1 PM

 

Liberty Family Resource Center

3525 Resource Drive, 21133 Room C51

Tuesday, February 14, noon to 1 PM 

For more information about the National Diabetes Prevention Program in Baltimore County, call the Department of Health at 410-887-0413.

 

 


 
 
Revised September 26, 2016