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Baltimore County Now

Stay informed of what's happening in Baltimore County.

photo fo potholeJim Lathe
Chief, Bureau of Highways

From a road-maintenance perspective – and as Chief of the Bureau of Highways that’s my default perspective – March is not the month of endless TV basketball. Nor is it an opportunity for everyone to be an ersatz Irishman. It is (and rightfully should be) Pothole Month. It’s the time of the year when frozen roads begin to thaw and come apart. Axel-breaking cavities materialize out of nowhere. Fissures form. And an already irritable driving public, fed up with snow and cold, faces an obstacle course of holes and black-water chasms every morning behind the wheel. March is the month to fill those holes and bring order to the world.

The figures are not in yet, but Baltimore County road crews have probably filled twenty thousand potholes this month. Pothole professionals (and let’s give them their due) from eleven Baltimore County shops have been working every weekday – each shop filling about one hundred holes.

Their job is often dubbed a throw-and-go operation. They shovel a cold patch mix into the hole, filling it just above surface level (to allow for compaction) and then vanish. At the end of winter (early March) they begin the operation with cold patch and then move on to more durable hot mix as it becomes available with the onset of spring.

Pothole patching is a very big job. It varies from year to year. Almost seventy thousand holes were filled in 2001 and less than forty thousand in 2012, a relatively mild winter. I suspect that this winter will be closer to the top than the bottom. That, at least, is what March portends.


photo of woman helping older man walkMichelle Bruns, Caregiver Program Manager, Department of Aging

Are you taking care of an older relative or friend?  Feeling tired, frustrated or overwhelmed by the demands of caregiving? 

After attending last year’s BCDA Caregivers Mini-Conference, a family caregiver commented, “I attended the Annual Caregivers Mini-Conference with my mother because she is the primary caregiver for my father, her husband of almost 60 years. She and I had been overwhelmed and exhausted by his care needs. At the Mini-Conference we learned about new resources and tips to make our caregiving easier. We went in the door that day feeling “burned out” and came out with new suggestions and a brighter attitude about our situation!”

Become a more resilient caregiver by attending this year’s Baltimore County Department of Aging Caregivers Mini-Conference, Saturday, April 11 at the BYKOTA Senior Center, 611 Central Avenue, Towson 21204. Doors open at 8:30 a.m. and the event concludes at 12:30 p.m. Guest speakers will inform the audience about stress reducing resources for themselves, as well as programs and services for older adults. Participants will receive tips for healthy living and a quick cooking demonstration. Resource tables will be available throughout the event, staffed by specialists in the field of aging and disabilities. There is no admission charge and parking is free. Continental breakfast and beverages available, sponsored by AARP.

If you are a family member caring for an older adult in the Baltimore area, you owe it to yourself to come out for half a day to refresh yourself in your role as caregiver. All are welcome. No pre-registration; just come that day!

To discover more information about the Caregivers Program or the conference, contact 410-887-4724.


montage of imagesTeri Rising, Historic Preservation Planner
Department of Planning

While it is hard to believe today, educational opportunities for young women were not readily available during the mid-19th century in the United States.  In Baltimore County, we are fortunate to have several historic schools that were founded for the primary purpose of educating young women.  These institutions were made possible by the shared vision of women and religious organizations who provided the resources necessary for their establishment.  While their historic campuses feature a variety of 19th century architectural styles, together they tell a story of those who dedicated their lives to the mission of educating young women.  In honor of Women’s History Month, let’s learn about some of these historically significant schools. 

Just outside of historic Reisterstown is the former Hannah More Academy campus which was established in 1832.  Built on land donated by Mrs. Ann Neilson, the former girls’ Episcopal boarding and day school provided education to young women until it merged with Saint Timothy’s School in Greenspring Valley in 1974.  While the original school buildings were lost to fire in 1857, the school was rebuilt and today houses various nonprofit offices and recreational space.  Located on the campus is the Gothic Revival board and batten Saint Michael’s Chapel, a National Register property and Baltimore County Landmark. 

photo of Mount de SalesThe Mount de Sales Academy has been educating young women within the walls of its historic campus in Catonsville since 1852.  Organized by the Sisters of the Visitation, this was the first Catholic institution in Baltimore County to provide educational opportunities to young women of all religions and backgrounds.  The school is also significant as the oldest educational facility in the County still actively in use for its original purpose.  The 19th century collection of campus buildings are on the National Register of Historic Places and the Baltimore County Landmarks List.

photo of Oldfields SchoolOldfields School is situated in the former village of Glencoe that grew with the arrival of the railroad in 1838.  Located near the Gunpowder River, Oldfields School was founded by Mrs. Anna Austen McCulloch in 1867.  The school began in her mid-19th century double tenant house, now a Baltimore County Landmark, and referred to on campus as the “Old House”. Unlike many early schools for young women, Oldfields was not affiliated with any particular denomination and was known for its progressive curriculum which featured subjects and activities not easily found in other institutions of the time. 

Further Reading-

To learn more about the history of women’s education along with these historic schools:

National Women’s History Museum – The History of Women and Education

Baltimore County’s National Register properties

Baltimore County’s Final Landmarks

Mount De Sales Academy

Oldfields School


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