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Baltimore County News

Baltimore County News

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  1. Kamenetz Renews Vision for Sparrows Point

    Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz renewed his call for a comprehensive vision for the Sparrows Point Peninsula, calling a County report issued last year a "road map to the future," and urging adoption of the plan by the property owners.
    Fri, 22 Aug 2014 19:48:45 GMThttp://www.baltimorecountymd.gov/News/releases/0822sparrowspoint.html
  2. Merritt Pavilion Announces Progress for Dundalk Project

    The developer of the proposed Merritt Pavilion is close to securing commitments from three well-known national restaurant chains to bring their restaurants to Dundalk.
    Wed, 20 Aug 2014 14:55:38 GMThttp://www.baltimorecountymd.gov/News/releases/0820dundalk.html
  3. County Continues to Diversify Police and Fire Departments

    Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz announced today that the County's latest police and fire recruit classes demonstrate ongoing progress in the County's effort to diversify its public safety workforce.
    Tue, 19 Aug 2014 19:05:22 GMThttp://www.baltimorecountymd.gov/News/releases/0819diversity.html

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Baltimore County Now - Blog

Baltimore County Now

Stay informed of what's happening in Baltimore County.
  1. Add Some Green Time to their Screen Time!

    Justin Tucker
    Intern, Baltimore County Communications Office

    As I continue to make the transition into adulthood, I often find myself taking trips down memory lane. I recall racing home from school and flying through my homework so that I could get outside to a game of touch football or pick-up basketball with the other neighborhood kids.  Before we knew it the sun would vanish and we’d all be heading in, ready to do it all over again the next day.  Those were the good days, as many older adults might say.

    But it seems as though today’s youth has a different idea of what makes a day good. Hours upon hours of fast-moving images on a screen with accompanying sound effects have replaced carefree outdoor play. It’s hard to believe that the average American child today spends only four to seven minutes per day in unstructured outdoor play, according to the National Wildlife Federation and their “Be Out There” initiative. While it may appear to be cool to spend hundreds of dollars on and obsess over the latest gadgets, the real expense is our nation’s declining health.

    According to the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, more than a third of children and adolescents were overweight or obese in 2012. The fact is, the lack of outdoor physical activity decreases physical fitness levels, increases the frequency of ADHD, and increases stress levels in children. The National Wildlife Federation notes some surprising benefits to outdoor play which include:

    ·         Healthier bodies with increased levels of Vitamin D, which helps to fight off serious health issues such as heart disease and diabetes.

    ·         Improved distance vision and reduced chance of nearsightedness.

    ·         Improved performance on standardized tests and critical thinking skills.

    ·         Stress levels have been shown to drop within minutes of “green time,” and free play with others helps with emotional development and lessens the chances of children developing symptoms of anxiety and depression.

    If you ask me, it sounds like a pretty simple solution to such a growing problem. Encouraging kids to go out and play in the fresh air creates fun childhood memories while helping to build the body, spirit and mind.

    It’s easy. You can start your kids on the right path by finding a park or playground or walking trail near you.

    Thu, 21 Aug 2014 22:14:00 GMThttp://www.baltimorecountymd.gov/News/BaltimoreCountyNow/Add_Some_Green_Time_to_their_Screen_Time
  2. How to Help First Responders Help You

    Captain Bruce Schultz
    Baltimore County Office of the Fire Marshal

    When police, fire or medical emergencies occur, the single most critical link in the chain of survival is the citizen who calls 911 to report the situation and provide details.

    Once a call comes into the 911 Center, a call taker answers the phone and begins to collect pertinent information about the location of the incident, type of emergency and phone numbers. They also can provide essential instructions to the caller about how to assist until the arrival of the police and/or fire department responders.

    Once call takers determine which agency --  or both --  is needed, the call is routed to the police and/or fire dispatchers who assign the closest appropriate units and get them started towards the address of the emergency. While emergency responders are en-route, the 911 Center call taker will continue to gather additional information which provides responders with a better idea of the location and exactly what is happening.

     Citizens can help responding units in a number of ways:

    ·        In areas where long or common driveways exist, or in an apartment or office building, have someone meet the emergency units at the entrance and direct them into the exact location where help is needed.

    ·        In recreational areas or shopping centers, take note of the building or store name and helpful landmarks. This can save precious minutes.

    ·        Try your best to keep calm and provide as much specific information as you can about the location and the type of emergency you are reporting.

    ·        If possible, have someone ready to meet and update the responders. The quicker responders can gauge the situation, the sooner the proper interventions can begin.

    ·        Before an emergency occurs, make sure that your house or building has visible street numbers that are easy to read, even at night. The Baltimore County Fire Prevention Code requires residential numbers to be at least three inches in size. Commercial buildings must be marked with six- inch numbers.

    These are some of the most important ways you can help us help you!

    Thu, 21 Aug 2014 20:58:00 GMThttp://www.baltimorecountymd.gov/News/BaltimoreCountyNow/How_to_Help_First_Responders_Help_You

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