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Baltimore County News

Stay informed of what's happening in Baltimore County.
Date: Aug 2019

Expansion Creates Greater Opportunity for Students to Attend CCBC Tuition-free 

More Baltimore County residents now have access to a debt-free college education thanks to expanded eligibility for the Baltimore County College Promise Scholarship. Baltimore County Executive Johnny Olszewski, with support from the Baltimore County Council, increased the income level that qualify for the program from $85,000 to $150,000, allowing more middle-class residents the opportunity to attend Community College of Baltimore County free of tuition and fees.

Photo of Baltimore County Executive Johnny Olszewski speaking

“Education is my number one priority, and that doesn’t stop when students graduate from our public school system. Higher education can open countless doors of opportunities for our students, and that’s why we’re taking steps to expand access to the opportunities available at our community colleges,” Olszewski said.

Baltimore County College Promise Scholarship Growth

Photo of a group holding Got Promise signs

The Baltimore County College Promise Scholarship has experienced tremendous growth since it was introduced in the spring of 2018. Last year, 111 scholarships were awarded. Today, there are nearly 400 Baltimore County College Promise scholarship recipients and that number continues to grow. With the expanded income eligibility requirements, CCBC expects a boost in inquiries as well as qualified students.

“The increased income requirements is a real game-changer for Baltimore County residents,” said CCBC President Sandra Kurtinitis. “Too often middle-class Americans are left out of opportunities like this. Their income is too high to qualify for Pell grants; yet, too low to enable them to send their children to community college full-time. The Baltimore County College Promise Scholarship is allowing academically-prepared students the opportunity to earn a college education debt-free. We are fortunate to have legislators who believe in the importance of public higher education and are willing to invest dollars behind this life-changing program.”

Eligibility Requirements

Photo of Baltimore County Executive Johnny Olszewski standing next to three others

In addition to the income requirement, other eligibility requirements include: 

  • Be a Baltimore County resident
  • Have a GPA of 2.3 or higher
  • Be a 2015 to 2019 high school or external diploma degree graduate
  • Be enrolled full-time at CCBC (12 credits or more) 

Baltimore County College Promise scholarships cover all degree and certificate programs as well as select workforce training certification programs. The scholarship is calculated as a “last dollar in” award, meaning that it is applied after all other financial awards and state aid have been utilized.

CCBC student and scholarship recipient Christa Bryant says the Baltimore County College Promise Scholarship is making her pursuit of an associate degree stress-free.

“My mother, who is retired, no longer has to consider going back to work to help me cover my tuition,” says Bryant. “I can now take a full load of classes and not spend sleepless nights worrying about how to pay the bill.”


Students can apply for the Baltimore County College Promise Scholarship throughout the year. Watch the press event and, for complete application details, visit www.ccbcmd.edu/collegepromise.

About the Community College of Baltimore County 

Photo of Baltimore County Executive Johnny Olszewski speaking in the foreground with someone looking on in the background

Since 1957, CCBC has opened the doors to accessible, affordable, high-quality education empowering generations of area residents to transform their lives and the lives of others. Each year, nearly 60,000 students enroll at the college’s main campuses, extension centers and online to make their starts, earn degrees, launch and build careers. CCBC offers the region’s most expansive selection of degree, certificate and workplace certification programs that prepare students for transfer, job entry and career advancement in such industries as business, education, health care, information technology, cybersecurity, construction and transportation. CCBC is nationally recognized as a leader in innovative learning strategies, among the nation’s top associate degree producers, and designated as a Military Times Best College 2018.

CCBC is accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education, 3624 Market Street, 2nd Floor West, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (267-284-5000). The Middle States Commission on Higher Education is an institutional accrediting agency recognized by the U.S. Secretary of Education and the Council for Higher Education Accreditation.


No Trash, Recycling or Yard Waste Collection on Monday

Baltimore County government offices, and the District and Circuit Courts, will be closed on Monday, September 2, in recognition of the Labor Day holiday. Health Department clinics and senior centers will be closed, and CountyRide vans will not operate. All branches of the Baltimore County Public Library will be closed and parking meters will be free on the holiday.

View Your Collection Schedule

The impact of holidays varies among Baltimore County collection schedules. County residents should consult their particular collection schedule to see the impact of holidays on when they should set out trash, recycling and yard materials. Collection schedules are available for download on the Bureau of Solid Waste Management’s website, may be requested by calling 410-887-2000 or can be viewed on the County’s BaltCoGo app, available on mobile phones. The app is offered free of charge to Android and iPhone users and may be downloaded from their respective app stores. 

Drop-Off Centers Closed

Baltimore County offices, and trash and recycling drop-off facilities, including Eastern Sanitary Landfill in White Marsh, will be closed on Monday, September 2. 


Signs Around the County Aim to Raise Awareness and Reduce Stigma

Baltimore County Executive Johnny Olszewski announced the placement of overdose awareness signs around the County in an effort to shine light on the opioid epidemic and reduce the stigma often associated with addiction. Strategically placed in five, high-visibility locations around the County, the signs will display the total number of overdoses and fatal overdoses in the County so far this year.

Photo of Baltimore County Executive Johnny Olszewski speaking

“There’s not a community in our County that hasn’t been touched by the disease of opioid addiction and we have to do everything within our power to raise awareness, increase access to services and save lives. These signs will be a stark reminder that this crisis persists and that we have a responsibility to help our sons, daughters, mothers, fathers, neighbors and friends who are struggling,” Olszewski said.

About the Daniel Carl Torsch Foundation

Photo of the overdose awareness sign

The signs were created with support from the Daniel Carl Torsch Foundation and sponsors identified by foundation Executive Director Toni Torsch. Torsch created the foundation following the death of her son, Daniel, from a heroin overdose. The foundation works to raise awareness of opioid addiction and overdose, helps individuals find treatment resources and provides training for individuals to use the overdose-reversal drug naloxone.

“I applaud the Torsch Foundation for partnering with the County to provide awareness and education of overdose death statistics,” said Dr. Gregory Wm. Branch, Director of the Baltimore County Department of Health and Human Services. “Anyone who is facing an opioid addiction or knows someone who is, should reach out and prevent another untimely death by calling our REACH Helpline, 410-88-REACH (410-887-3224).”

Combating the Opioid Epidemic

A medium shot photo of Baltimore County Executive Johnny Olszewski speaking

Each month, the Baltimore County Police Department will update the numbers displayed on the signs, which will be located at the Public Safety Building in Towson, as well as the Dundalk, Pikesville, White Marsh and Woodlawn precinct buildings.

"In my very first meeting with newly-elected County Executive Olszewski, I asked for help breaking a bureaucratic logjam that prevented these signs from going up. He delivered. This is one part of a more robust strategy toward reducing and eliminating opioid abuse," said Councilman David Marks.

Olszewski has taken a number of critical steps in the effort to combat the opioid epidemic. As recommended by his transition team, he included funds in his first budget to create an Opioid Strategy Coordinator position to guide strategy across agencies and ensure a cohesive, comprehensive response.

In addition, he named an Opioid Response Working Group to engage County residents and stakeholders, examine data, assess the County’s current efforts and make recommendations for how the County can continue to ramp up its efforts to address addiction and overdose. The working group will release its draft report for public comment in the coming weeks.

Learn more about the County’s response to the opioid epidemic.


 
 
Revised September 11, 2017