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Baltimore County News

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Job readiness training available this summer in County libraries

Job Connector is bringing job readiness training into Baltimore County communities. Beginning this summer, the Baltimore County Department of Economic and Workforce Development will offer new job readiness workshops at County libraries. The workshops, designed with employer input, address essential workplace skills such as effective communication skills, maximizing time in the workplace, displaying the image of your workplace, and managing your mindset.

Each of the new Workplace Excellence sessions will meet twice a week for three weeks and be facilitated by a certified trainer from the County’s Workforce Development American Job Centers.

“This program is about customer service, bringing new Baltimore County job programs directly to people in their communities. We’re ‘going local’ to help job seekers sharpen their skills and get hired faster,” said Baltimore County Executive Don Mohler.

The free, three week sessions are geared for adult job seekers. The summer 2018 sessions will take place at the Lansdowne and Essex libraries in July and Loch Raven and Sollers Point libraries in August. Enrollment is limited. Interested County residents must apply via e-mail to jobconnector@baltimorecountymd.gov or call 410-887-8096.

“This program is an excellent example of government working smarter by bringing agencies together to help people looking for a job. Library staff and career consultants bring different skills sets, helping us provide the best service to job seekers throughout the year,” said Will Anderson, Director of the Baltimore County Department of Economic and Workforce Development.

“With 19 locations, each open 69 hours a week, our branches are gathering spaces that are accessible and trusted within the communities we serve. Our knowledgeable and friendly staff, along with public computers, loanable laptops and other essential resources, provide key tools job seekers need,” said Paula Miller, Director of the Baltimore County Public Library.

Job Connector

The Job Connector in Communities initiative is part of an innovative $2.5 million workforce program designed to assure employers have a workforce ready to fill high-demand jobs in high-demand fields. With over $5 billion in new economic development projects in the County, companies are hiring, but chronic shortages of qualified workers remain in many fields.


Job Connector starts by looking at the specific jobs and skills that are needed in the Baltimore region. This results in a better match between employer and job seeker, and more certain career paths for employees who want to know that their hard work and skills can lead to promotions and higher wage jobs.

“With low unemployment and a tight job market, companies are ready to hire today. Job Connector is helping to reduce the gap between the skills job seekers have and the skills employers need,” said Mohler.

High Demand Jobs

Research prepared for the Baltimore County Workforce Development Board identified nine key industries that will drive 75% of the job growth in Baltimore County over the next decade: Healthcare, Corporate Operations/Customer Service, Construction, Financial Services, Manufacturing, Federal Agencies, Port/Logistics/Distribution, Education, and Information Technology.

Baltimore County’s American Job Centers at Liberty Center, Hunt Valley and Eastpoint have deployed customized tool kits to help career consultants guide job seekers to training and job openings in these high-demand fields.

For more information go to baltimorecountymd.gov/jobconnector.


Approximately 37,500 Gallons Released into Beaverdam Run

Baltimore County Department of Public Works has reported a sanitary sewer overflow of 37,500 gallons at the Texas Sewage Pumping Station, located at 10320 York Road in Cockeysville. The release began at 8:50 a.m. Tuesday and was stopped within eighteen minutes, at 9:08 a.m.

The overflow occurred while crews were in the process of repairing a force main leading from the pumping station. The main was shut down Tuesday morning and the effluent routed through a pump-around so that repairs could be made. While testing the system, a joint split and the pump-around pipe discharged. The pipe material and the joints are being investigated.    

The release went into a branch of Beaverdam Run, a tributary to the Loch Raven Reservoir. As a precaution, contact with the waters of the stream should be avoided. The Baltimore County Department of Health will issue water contact advisories when necessary on the Department's website:

http://www.baltimorecountymd.gov/Agencies/health/environmentalhealth/watersampling/alertadvisory.html


By Gregory Wm. Branch, M.D., MBA, CPE, FACP, Director, Baltimore County Department of Health and Human, Services          

The opioid epidemic has a tight grip on communities across the country. In Baltimore County, we are employing an array of strategies to help save lives. While the Baltimore County Department of Health is leading these strategies, it is increasingly clear that we all have a role to play in the County’s R.E.A.C.H. effort.

Recovery

Meet people where they are

The Department of Health provides specialists to help people navigate the steps to recovery. Our Certified Peer Recovery Specialists meet with clients, provide one-on-one training and assist with securing resources and services. They use caring, compassionate communication to connect with clients seeking help.

Education

Know what to do

Overdose deaths involving fentanyl are rising at an alarming rate. We all need to become familiar with the dangers of fentanyl and learn what to do if we suspect acquaintances, family members or loved ones of being at risk. Baltimore County provides free overdose response training in locations across the County each month. These trainings teach what an opioid is, how to recognize, respond to and prevent an opioid overdose and how to administer naloxone, the non-addictive medication that reverses the effects of opioids. Click here for training dates.

Assessment

Connect to services

We work diligently to help people battling addiction get the help they need to recover. The County has walk-in assessment clinics at the Eastern Family Resource Center and the Liberty Family Resource Center. Screening assessments also are conducted at all substance abuse sites and Strategic Brief Intervention and Referral Treatment is implemented at school-based wellness centers across the County.

Collaboration

Know what is in your medicine cabinet

Unused prescription drugs in the wrong hands can be lethal. Parents, grandparents and guardians must take inventory of what is in their medicine cabinets, secure all unexpired medications that are genuinely needed, and use drug drop boxes to safely dispose of those that are not. Drug drop boxes are located outside every Baltimore County police precinct and are always available. This is just one example of the County partnerships at work in our battle against substance misuse.

HELP

410-88-REACH

If you or someone you know is fighting substance misuse issues, know that there is help. Baltimore County’s 410-88-REACH (410-887-3224) is our help line and the place to call to get information about available resources, referrals and to have your questions and concerns addressed. This help line is completely confidential and is answered by specialists Monday through Saturday from 8:30 a.m. – midnight. Online information for substance use and recovery services can also be found at www.baltimorecountymd.gov/41088REACH.


 
 
Revised September 11, 2017