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Fiscal Sustainability

With the goal of boosting community engagement and identifying budget deficiencies, the County Executive has created a new blue ribbon commission tasked with studying the County budget process.

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Johnny O and his family.

"I grew up in the shadow of a steel mill. I saw firsthand the detrimental effects the mill’s closure had on my friends and family. But like so many in Baltimore County, I didn’t give up, I went to work."

- John Olszewski, Jr.

Johnny O and his family.

"I spent 7 years teaching in the Baltimore County Public School System. I know what needs to happen to bring our children’s schools into the 21st century."

- John Olszewski, Jr.

Johnny O and his family.

"For nearly a decade I served in the state legislature working to improve education, bring jobs to Maryland, and improve the quality of life for all Marylanders."

- John Olszewski, Jr.

In The News

 

Baltimore County News

Stay informed of what's happening in Baltimore County.
  1. Baltimore County Seeks Age-Friendly Community Input

    Share Your Feedback Via Online Survey

    Baltimore County is seeking community input on making Baltimore County more age-friendly to empower residents of all ages and abilities to live, work, play and reside comfortably in their communities.

    “An age-friendly Baltimore County is one where all residents feel welcome and can take comfort in knowing that their concerns are being heard and their needs are being met,” said County Executive Johnny Olszewski.

    About the Age-Friendly Baltimore County Initiative

    County Executive Olszewski and the Baltimore County Department of Aging earlier this year launched the Age-Friendly Baltimore County initiative in partnership with the AARP network of Age-Friendly states and communities. The network is the United States affiliate of the World Health Organization’s (WHO) Age-Friendly Cities and Communities Program, an international effort launched in 2006 to help cities prepare for rapid population aging and the parallel trend of urbanization.

    The Age-Friendly Baltimore County initiative is examining issues such as affordable and accessible housing; creating open and accessible green spaces; accessible public transportation options and ways to create more opportunities for civic engagement and employment.

    To fill out the survey, visit the questionnaire on SurveyMonkey.

    Additional Information

    For more information or to get involved:

     The mission of the Baltimore County Department of Aging is to strengthen lives by providing services, programs and connections to resources. For more information on the various programs provided by BCDA, visit www.baltimorecountymd.gov/aging.

    Fri, 15 Nov 2019 15:25:00 GMThttps://www.baltimorecountymd.gov/News/BaltimoreCountyNow/baltimore-county-seeks-age-friendly-community-input
  2. Baltimore County Opioid Response Working Group Issues Final Report

    Recommendations to Prevent Opiod Addiction, Expand Treatment and Reduce Overdose Deaths Released

    The Opioid Response Working Group convened by Baltimore County Executive Johnny Olszewski today released its final report (PDF), which includes 11 recommendations to prevent addiction, expand access to treatment and reduce overdose deaths.

    The recommendations fall into seven categories, including stigma, prevention, treatment, recovery, family support, criminal justice, and harm reduction.

    “Every overdose death means the loss of a son, daughter, mother, father, brother, sister, neighbor and friend. We must act strategically and decisively to address this devastating epidemic,” County Executive Olszewski said. “While we are proud of the tangible steps we are taking to address this epidemic, every death is preventable and we must continue to do more. I commend our working group for listening to people across the county and producing a set of specific recommendations to help us take immediate action and save lives.”

    Statistics

    Baltimore County has the second highest number of overdose deaths in the state – in 2018, 348 people died from opioid-related overdoses, up from 323 in 2017. In the first six months of 2019, the county saw a small decline in the number of overdose deaths, but there were still 187 drug and alcohol overdose deaths in the county in that period.

    Olszewski named an Opioid Strategy Coordinator and in May, he created the Opioid Response Working Group. The Working Group gathered public input through an online survey and two public meetings, as well as information from experts and stakeholders. A draft report was released in September with an opportunity for public comment.

    “We appreciate the engagement of so many people across the county sharing their knowledge and experience on the opioid crisis,” said working group chair and President and CEO of GBMC HealthCare System Dr. John Chessare. “These recommendations reflect this input and will set the County on a path for further progress.”

    The Recommendations

    The working group recommendations released today are:

    1. The Department of Health should develop and launch an expanded campaign to reduce stigma against people who use drugs and medication-based treatment for opioid use disorder.
    2. Baltimore County Public Schools should implement programs that build resilience among and support for youth.
    3. The Department of Health should build partnerships with government and community organizations to prevent opioid misuse by addressing social determinants of substance use.
    4. The Department of Health should set standards for providing addiction treatment in hospitals, primary care clinics, mental health programs, and addiction treatment programs. These standards should include offering individuals with opioid use disorder treatment with FDA-approved medications.
    5. The County should revise zoning restrictions to permit more opioid treatment programs that meet standards for high quality to serve county residents.
    6. The Department of Health should consider hub and spoke or similar models that support patients with different levels of complexity and changing needs over the course of treatment.
    7. The Department of Planning should develop a proposal to address barriers to the opening of recovery housing in Baltimore County. The proposal should receive public comment and be considered for adoption by the Planning Board, County Council, and County Executive..  
    8. The Department of Health and Human Services should strengthen family support in two high-priority areas: for pregnant and parenting individuals and their families, and for family members of individuals affected by addiction.
    9. Baltimore County should make treatment with all three FDA-approved medications available to all individuals with opioid use disorder in the County correctional system.
    10. The Police Department should develop a plan to adopt a formal program that diverts individuals with a substance use disorder to treatment services instead of incarceration.
    11. The Department of Health should expand access to harm reduction programs based in evidence for populations at risk of overdose.

    The working group today also released responses (PDF) to the online survey and comments received about the draft report.

    The full Report of Findings and Recommendations (PDF) is available for downloading and on the County's webpage for the Opioid Response Working Group.

    Wed, 13 Nov 2019 16:47:00 GMThttps://www.baltimorecountymd.gov/News/BaltimoreCountyNow/baltimore-county-opioid-response-working-group-issues-final-report
  3. Olszewski Issues Statement Commending State Leaders on Commitment to School Construction Funding

    Olszewski Response to the Built to Learn Act

    Baltimore County Executive Johnny Olszewski today issued the following statement in response to the announcement of the Built to Learn Act:

    “I have proudly led the fight for additional state school construction funding to provide our children and educators with the school facilities they deserve.

    Thanks to leadership of Speaker Adrienne Jones and the Baltimore County delegation, we saw real progress last year as the House passed the Build to Learn Act.

    I applaud Speaker Jones, Senate President Miller, and Senator Ferguson for taking up our fight, and I am confident that they will get the job done this year for communities across Maryland.”

    Wed, 06 Nov 2019 16:29:00 GMThttps://www.baltimorecountymd.gov/News/BaltimoreCountyNow/olszewski-issues-statement-commending-state-leaders-on-commitment-to-school-construction-funding
  4. County Executive Olszewski Issues Statement Following Passage of the HOME Act

    On the Passage of the HOME Act

    Baltimore County Executive Johnny Olszewski today issued the following statement in response to the Baltimore County Council’s passage of the HOME Act:

    “Today is a major step forward for Baltimore County. I thank the County Council for recognizing that discrimination in any form is wrong, and for working with me in taking this critical step to fulfill our legal and moral obligations. Together we will continue to expand economic opportunity, improve equity and build a better Baltimore County.”

    Tue, 05 Nov 2019 14:11:00 GMThttps://www.baltimorecountymd.gov/News/BaltimoreCountyNow/county-executive-olszewski-issues-statement-following-passage-of-the-home-act
  5. County Seeks Bids to Develop Long-Term School Construction Plan

    Ten-Year Improvement Plan for All Schools

    Baltimore County and Baltimore County Public Schools (BCPS) today issued a Request for Proposals (RFP) (PDF) for an independent consultant to assist in the development of a long-range plan for identifying and prioritizing capital improvements to Baltimore County’s school buildings. The plan will prioritize needs based on enrollment projections and capacity, educational equity and adequacy, and the conditions of facilities.

    “Every student and educator deserves a safe, modern school where they can learn and grow. While Baltimore County has made significant progress, we still have a number of aging facilities and a growing student population which leads to unacceptable learning conditions for many of our students,” said County Executive Johnny Olszewski. “Providing a world-class education for our children is and will always be the number one priority of my administration. This long-term plan will outline a clear roadmap to ensure we can best serve all our children and communities.”

    “Building on the substantial progress made during the past decade to modernize our schools, this plan will allow us to comfortably accommodate our growing enrollment into the next decade,” said Superintendent Dr. Darryl L. Williams. “I deeply appreciate the support and partnership from state and County elected officials.”

    Equitable and Effective Allocation of School Construction Funds

    The RFP issued today anticipates identifying a consultant to develop a High School Master Plan by September 2020, followed by a plan for all remaining schools, centers and programs by May 2021. Baltimore County has significant school construction needs, including eight remaining projects under the Schools for Our Future program. In addition, the County is projected to have 1,700 more students than seats in its high schools over the next decade.

    In response to these challenges, Olszewski has made support for public education his administration’s top priority. Recognizing the need for a long-term plan to ensure the County has a roadmap for equitable and effective allocation of school construction dollars, County Executive Olszewski included funds for the development of a 10-year capital plan in his Fiscal Year 2020 budget.

    Olszewski also provided funds in the current budget for all remaining Schools for Our Future projects and has allocated $15 million for planning and design at Lansdowne High School. He also recently committed planning funds for both Towson and Dulaney High Schools.

    Support for Public Education a Top Priority

    All of these projects are unable to move forward without the State of Maryland’s remaining portion of funding. County Executive Olszewski has consistently called on the state to increase its commitment to help the County meet the needs of its growing student population. Earlier this year, Olszewski called on Governor Hogan to release $127 million in currently withheld school construction funding approved by the legislature in the 2019 legislative session.

    Maryland House of Delegates Speaker Adrienne Jones has indicated that she intends to make school construction a top priority for the state in the upcoming legislative session and Olszewski has committed to advocating on behalf of Baltimore County students in Annapolis.

    Mon, 04 Nov 2019 15:21:00 GMThttps://www.baltimorecountymd.gov/News/BaltimoreCountyNow/baltimore-county-seeks-bids-to-develop-long-term-school-construction-plan
 
Read more from Baltimore County News

County Executive Biography

County Executive John A. Olszewski, Jr.

A lifelong Baltimore County resident, Johnny believes in the power of public service and giving back to the community that has done so much for him. Learn More.