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Official News Blog of Baltimore County police, fire, homeland security and emergency management. Call 911 to report crimes in progress and emergencies.
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UPDATE (March 2, 2020 4:01 p.m.):

booking photo of Calvin Krasheen FoggDetectives from the Baltimore County Police Homicide Unit have charged a man in the shooting death of David Leroy King on January 24.

Calvin Krasheen Fogg (27) with no fixed address is charged with first degree murder in the death of David King and first degree attempted murder in the shooting of a second man during the incident. Fogg is held on no bail status at the Baltimore County Detention Center following a bail review hearing. 

Original Release (January 24, 2020 9:04 a.m.):

Police Investigating Homicide in Essex

A double shooting in Essex left one man dead this morning.

At 5:11 a.m. officers responded to the 900 block of Holgate Drive for a shooting. Arriving officers found two adult men outside a home who were both suffering gunshot wounds. Medics responded and transported one man to a local hospital with non-life-threatening injuries. The second man was pronounced deceased at the scene.

The deceased man has been identified as David Leroy King, 29, of the 2100 block of Westfield Road.

Baltimore County Homicide Detectives are currently investigating the circumstances surrounding this incident. Anyone with information should contact the Baltimore County Police Homicide Unit by calling 410-307-2020. Callers may remain anonymous and may be eligible for a reward when submitting tips through Metro Crime Stoppers by calling 1-866-7LOCKUP.

Reward Offered

Metro Crime Stoppers, an organization that is separate from the Baltimore County Police Department and Baltimore County Government, offers rewards for information in connection with felony offenses.

Anonymous tips can be sent to Metro Crime Stoppers by phone, online or via mobile app.

Phone: 1-866-7LOCKUP

Web tip: www.metrocrimestoppers.org

NEW Mobile App: P3TIPS

BCoFD has heard from many residents with questions about Maryland's new smoke alarm law, which was signed in 2013 but includes some requirements that just took effect on January 1, 2018. This fact sheet is designed to clarify this regulation and what it means for you.

What the law requires now

  • Replacement of battery-only smoke alarms with new, 10-year smoke alarms with sealed batteries and a "hush" feature (to silence the alarm temporarily during cooking).
  • Replacement of hardwired devices more than 10 years old. Hardwired devices newer than 10 years still are acceptable.
  • Hard-wired devices must be replaced with hard-wired devices. You cannot replace a hard-wired alarm with a battery-only alarm.

What the law requires in the future

  • The law requires replacement of ALL smoke alarms -- hard-wired and battery-only -- when they are 10 years old. That means 10 years from the date of manufacture printed on on the back of the alarm. If you can't find a date, your smoke alarm needs to be replaced.
  • Smoke alarms lose their operational sensitivity after 10 years.
  • Hard-wired devices must be replaced with hard-wired devices.

What brand of alarm should I buy?

  • BCoFD does not endorse one manufacturer over another.
  • Smoke alarms are available at most home supply and "big box" retail stores and at many online retailers.
  • Alarms should comply with Underwriters Laboratory (UL) 217, "Standard for Safety for Single and Multiple Station Smoke Alarm."

What about rental properties?

  • The new law applies to rental properties.
  • However, the new requirements do not impact individuals in the County’s rental registration program because the County’s rental registration provisions do not permit battery-operated smoke detector units and require hard-wired smoke detectors.

Enforcement

  • The local fire code does not grant right of entry into privately-owned single- and multi-family dwellings.

Purpose of the law

  • The law was designed to achieve the most reliable smoke alarm coverage possible in older dwellings without requiring homeowners to run new wiring.
  • The law's overall purpose is reduction of fire deaths and injuries.
  • Studies of residential fire fatalities show that more than half of smoke alarms in these incidents failed to sound because the 9-volt battery had been removed. The sealed battery requirement eliminates that problem.

Placement of smoke alarms   Smoke alarm location

Baltimore County Police Detective Michael Aiosa received the 2017 Exceptional Police Performance Award (from agencies with over 125 officers) from the Maryland Chiefs of Police Association. Detective Aiosa is currently assigned to the Department’s Criminal Investigations Bureau as a part of the Maryland Financial Crimes Task Force under the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Criminal Investigations Division. His tireless work netted the arrest of several individuals involved in a complex fraud scheme and a restitution order from the U.S. District Court, District of Maryland.

Detective Aiosa led an investigation, along with assistance from the IRS, into a six-year scheme in which the suspects created false business, tax, and financial documents. These documents were used to obtain loans from financing companies to purchase automobiles from area car dealerships. After purchasing the car under the guise of being qualified for the loan, the suspects created a false title for the car, concealing the existence of the loan. Using the false title, the suspects would sell the cars and pocket the money from the sale. Detective Aiosa was able to determine that the scheme incurred at least a $1.2 million cost upon several car dealerships and lending institutions.

Detective Aiosa’s investigation led to the identification and indictment of three individuals for conspiracy to commit wire fraud, wire fraud, money laundering, and aiding and abetting. All three individuals were found guilty after being prosecuted by the U.S. Attorney’s Office, District of Maryland. The leader of the three was sentenced to eight years in federal prison and ordered to pay restitution in the amount of $692,587.63.

Great work Detective Aiosa and congratulations!

 
 
Revised June 27, 2017