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Keyword: carbon monoxide

This weekend marks the 50th week of theFirefighters have visited more than 22,000 homes through the Smoke & CO Alarm Education Program. Fire Department's Smoke & Carbon Monoxide  Education Program -- a program that has helped us reach more than 22,000 homes with life-saving fire safety information.

BCoFD station personnel will visit neighborhoods again this weekend, talking to residents about fire safety and specifically about how to install smoke and carbon monoxide (CO) alarms.  Equipping your home or apartment with these alarms is the single most important fire safety step you can take.

About 3,000 smoke/CO alarms have been distributed through the program to qualifying households. Details about the program are available on our Fire Department web site.

About the Program

This educational initiative—which targets neighborhoods at higher risk from fire and CO-related incidents—is supported by a major grant from the Federal Emergency Management Agency's Fire Prevention and Safety program. 

About 60 children and adults have been evacuated from a school in Owings Mills due to a carbon monoxide leak.

Baltimore County Fire and EMS crews responded at 11:17 a.m. to The Shafer Center, 11500 block of Cronridge Rd., 21117, a school for special needs children. Staff members noticed an unusual smell (probably the result of improper fuel combustion, since CO is odorless) and called BGE, which in turn called 911 after the school's carbon monoxide alarms activated.

BCoFD crews found high levels of CO, a dangerous gas produced by incomplete fuel combustion, and evacuated the building. Children and staff are housed next door at the Maryland Vehicle Emissions Inspection Program station. Shafer Center students and staff will not be allowed back into the building today; the Center is in the process of contacting parents.

One adult has been transported to local hospitals for evaluation of non life-threatening symptoms.

CO levels have dropped following ventilation and other mitigation by firefighters. Observations from Fire personnel indicate a problem with the heating system.

Fire crews began clearing the scene around 1:40 p.m.

A $589,000 federal grant will help Baltimore County fire officials provide education about preventing fires and carbon monoxide-related incidents, especially in neighborhoods at higher risk from these tragedies.

Fire officials, along with County Executive Kevin Kamenetz and Rep. C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger, are scheduled to kick off the program tomorrow at an 11 a.m. press briefing in Randallstown. The briefing will be held at the home of Theodore and Geraldine Barham, 3900 block of Zurich Rd., 21133; the Barhams are the first family to participate in the program.

A key component of the program is demonstration of smoke/CO alarm installation in homes without properly located alarms. Crews from the Randallstown Fire Station will assist the Barhams with smoke/CO alarm installation as part of tomorrow’s event.

“This grant is going to help us save lives,” Kamenetz said. “Working smoke/CO alarms prevent tragedies, and yet so many families in our communities don’t have them or don’t know how to use them.”

About the Program

Several months ago, BCoFD received the most significant federal fire safety grant in years, a $589,000 award issued under the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s Fire Prevention and Safety program. Under the terms of the grant, the County contributes 5 percent, or $29,452.

“We know that detectors save lives, but telling people to use them isn’t enough – and we know from experience that installing detectors doesn’t necessarily mean they are working,” Congressman Ruppersberger said. “This federal grant will enable local firefighters to make house calls to ensure residents not only have detectors, but that they will work when needed. This is exactly the type of common sense investment in public safety that our constituents expect us to prioritize.”

The grant includes the purchase of smoke/CO alarms for distribution to residents who participate in the educational program and meet the program criteria. The grant also includes smoke and CO alarms for the deaf and hard of hearing and printed educational materials in multiple languages.

“Our goal is to help people take charge of their own home fire and CO safety,” said Fire Chief Kyrle W. Preis III.

Fire crews from every career station have been identifying areas in their districts at risk of fire and CO-related incidents. Beginning April 14, Fire personnel will begin canvassing targeted neighborhoods, providing educational information, evaluating properties for safety recommendations and performing walk-through evaluations for residents who request them. Volunteer stations will be invited to assist with these events.

Specific locations will be announced via our social media platforms prior to the firefighters’ visits.

County Council Chair Julian E. Jones Jr., a veteran fire professional, praised this initiative. “After 32 years in the fire service, I know that prevention and early warning are critical in preventing injury and loss of life, and I enthusiastically support this proactive effort by the County to get modern smoke and CO detectors into homes,” he said.

Requesting a Visit

Residents may request a visit from Fire personnel to review home fire and CO safety prevention. A request form is available at www.baltimorecountymd.gov/preventhomefires

 

 

 
 
Revised June 27, 2017