Skip Navigation

Image of the Baltimore County Historic Courthouse

Baltimore County News

Stay informed of what's happening in Baltimore County.
Keyword: week

By Steve Walsh
Director of Public Works

Next time you take a drink of nice cool, clean water; flush away something nasty or take a pleasant drive, think of the engineers over time who have made our modern comforts and sanitation possible. Engineers are the original environmentalists who have toiled for centuries to protect us and our surroundings by coming up with ingenious ways to keep raw sewage, rotting garbage, pollution and disease under control and from affecting our daily lives.

The History of Engineering

Photo of an aqueduct

Ancient engineers developed the aqueducts and water treatment, starting with the ancient Egyptians who collected rainfall and designed copper pipelines to dispose of sewage. Around 2000 B.C., Hindus figured out that water should be stored in copper vessels, exposed to sunlight and filtered through charcoal. The early Romans created drains and sewers and fostered hygienic processes. The “filth, pestilence and plague” of the Dark Ages helped inspire further innovations in engineering.

In the 1600s, English philosopher Sir Francis Bacon conducted thousands of experiments on the treatment of water, including boiling, distillation and percolating it through filters. In the 1800s, hydraulic engineers worked out methods to deliver abundant clean water to the developing cities and reduce the choking pollution from industrial smokestacks. In the 20th century, American engineers sent Neil Armstrong to the moon to take his “giant leap for mankind.” For more of these historical nuggets, check out the interesting article "History of Environmental Engineering," by Washington University in St. Louis Professor Charles A. Buescher Jr., PE, DEE.

The County's World-Renowned Engineering

Photo of the shore of Loch Raven

If you hike or bike around Loch Raven, Prettyboy or Liberty Reservoirs, you may be interested to know that our world-renowned reservoir and dam system for drinking water in the Baltimore region is thanks to engineer extraordinaire Abel Wolman. He was in the very first graduating class of the Johns Hopkins School of Engineering in 1915, and went on to become the architect of Baltimore City’s expansive water and sewage treatment plants built in the 1930s, which still serve some 1.8 million people in Baltimore City and County.

Modern-day engineers come in all stripes, including civil, environmental, transportation, aeronautical, electrical, mechanical and chemical. They keep our bridges and roadways in working order, reduce stormwater run-off from roads and buildings, dredge waterways to keep them open, protect and restore our streams and shorelines, and much more.

National Engineers Week

Did you know that the word “engineer” derives from the Latin words, "ingenium," meaning "cleverness," and "ingeniare," meaning “to contrive or devise.” So if you know a clever engineer who is helping to keep our environment healthy and the gadgets, gizmos and systems of our society running smoothly, please take a moment to thank him or her during National Engineers Week, from February 17 through 23. (Sponsored by the National Society of Professional Engineers.)


Sixty-two participating restaurants will offer specials from January 18 through February 2, ranging from $15 to $35.

At the new Michael’s Café in Middle River, Baltimore County Executive Johnny Olszewski announced that the 17th Baltimore County Restaurant Week will begin on Friday, January 18. At the kick-off, Olszewski was joined by promotion partners Brent Howard, from the Baltimore County Chamber and Todd Collins of RestaurantReputations. Sixty-two Baltimore County restaurants have joined the winter promotion.

The participating restaurants from across the County will feature special menus at discounted, fixed prices, offering one to three course brunch, lunch and dinner specials ranging from $15 to $35. 

“Foodies and patrons alike look forward to Restaurant Week—it’s a great time for them to experience places they’ve been meaning to try—or return to an old favorite—at a big savings,” stated Olszewski. “We hope people across Baltimore County will experience the diverse cuisines our communities have to offer and support our local restaurant industry.”

“Baltimore County’s restaurants provide not only enjoyment for its patrons, but employment to 27,556 workers in its 1,613 establishments,” said Howard. “The restaurant industry is big business in Baltimore County, bringing in $1.6 billion in sales yearly.”

View a list of all participating restaurants and their menus, and place your reservations.

Other partners for the promotion include the Baltimore County Office of Tourism and Promotion, Lanterna Wine Distributors, Bond Distributing Company, Downtown Diane, The Restaurant Association of Maryland and CITYpeek.


Participating Restaurants to Offer Specials January 19 to February 3 

Organizers of Baltimore County Winter Restaurant Week are pleased to announce that the 15th, bi-annual promotion begins on Friday, January 19.

Participating restaurants from across the area will feature special menus at discounted, fixed prices, offering one to three course brunch, lunch or dinner specials ranging from $15 to $35. 

“Foodies and patrons alike look forward to Restaurant Week—it’s a great time for them to experience places they’ve been meaning to try at a big savings,” stated Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz. “I encourage everyone to experience the many diverse cuisines in the County and support the local restaurant industry.”

View the menus of the restaurants that have registered so far and remember to keep checking back as more register every day!


 
 
Revised September 11, 2017