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Bill bans chokeholds, limits use of force, expands de-escalation, and increases transparency to modernize policing in Baltimore County

Baltimore County Executive Johnny Olszewski, County Councilman Julian Jones, and other members of the Baltimore County Council today announced the Strengthening Modernization, Accountability, Reform, and Transparency (SMART) Policing Act, a comprehensive package of initiatives to improve and modernize policing in Baltimore County while strengthening community relations.

“We’ve heard from the public and the time to act is now. With the SMART Policing Act, Baltimore County will ban chokeholds, strengthen training in de-escalation, ensure there are limits on use of force, and increase transparency,” said Councilman Julian Jones, who will formally introduce the SMART Policing Act at the Baltimore County Council Meeting scheduled for tonight, September 8. “I value and respect the great men and women of the Baltimore County Police Department, and this commonsense bill will help ensure they receive the right training and policies to serve and protect every member of every community.”

“We are living in a moment that demands action, and I am proud to join Councilman Jones and his colleagues in support of the SMART Policing Act to strengthen accountability and promote more equitable policing for all,” said Baltimore County Executive Johnny Olszewski. “We announced unprecedented reforms in June, which began the process of improving transparency and strengthening relationships between law enforcement and the communities they serve. Today, we’re coming together united in Baltimore County’s next step forward in the ongoing fight for equal justice.”

The SMART Policing Act:

  • Modernizes Policing Tactics by:

    • Banning the use of all neck restraints, including chokeholds, unless a person’s life is in immediate jeopardy.

    • Requiring a policy specifying that officers render aid or call for medical care for any individual in police custody who has an obvious injury or complaint of injury.

    • Requiring the Baltimore County Police Department to introduce policy affirming the sanctity of life and the dignity and value of all persons.

  • Enhances and Enshrines Reforms on Use of Force by:

    • Requiring the Department to introduce policies to limit the use of force.

    • Requiring the Department to introduce policy obligating officers to intervene to stop fellow officers from using excessive force and report uses of force.

    • Providing protections to prohibit retaliation against those who report misconduct.

    • Requiring the Department to implement an early intervention system to provide officers at-risk of engaging in the use of excessive force with additional training or other behavioral interventions.

  • Improves Training and Accountability by:

    • Barring individuals with prior disciplinary records in other jurisdictions or agencies from serving as a Baltimore County Police Officer.

    • Requiring annual training in de-escalation, implicit bias, and the use of force.

  • Expands Transparency by:

    • Authorizing the Chief of Police to select up to two members of the public to serve on a police hearing board. Due to state law, final approval of the membership is subject to collective bargaining.

    • Requiring collection and public access to use of force data and police involved shootings.

“This is a critical time and we have a responsibility to do whatever we can to expand community based policing, promote crime reduction, and build public trust across Baltimore County. The SMART Policing Act will make an already strong police department even stronger,” said County Council Chair Cathy Bevins.

"I would like to thank all those who came together to support this legislation that continues robust law enforcement, in a smart manner that is sensitive to all our communities," said Councilman David Marks.

“Like so many, I’ve been inspired by the advocacy of our young people in calling for change. This important piece of legislation reaffirms our commitment to them by strengthening community relations for this generation — and for future generations,” said Councilman Izzy Patoka.

“The Baltimore County Police Department is already taking important steps designed to strengthen and assist our Department and our officers. This legislation will help ensure these actions are codified in law and protected for years to come. It is so important that our Police and communities continue to work together for the benefit of all,” said Councilman Wade Kach.

“I’m grateful for the work the brave men and women of the Baltimore County Police Department do each and every day to protect our residents and am proud of the Department’s ongoing work to improve transparency and accountability. I appreciate all those who have added their voices this legislation which will build on those efforts as we continue to work with our state legislators on additional next steps to improve policing in every neighborhood,” said Councilman Tom Quirk.

The SMART Policing Act is the latest effort from Baltimore County to improve accountability and strengthen relations between law enforcement officers and the communities they serve.

In June, County Executive Olszewski announced an unprecedented series of executive actions to address systemic challenges in the police department and promote more equitable policing, by:

  • Updating Use of Force policy. The Department has introduced policies that would be codified in law by the SMART Policing Act, including:

    • Affirming the sanctity of life.

    • Providing training in de-escalation, implicit bias, and the use of force.

    • Requiring officers in to intervene to stop fellow officers from using excessive force and report uses of force.

  • Implementing Fair and Impartial Police Training Curriculum for all Department members.

  • Increasing transparency of complaint, use of force and traffic stop data. In the coming weeks, Baltimore County will release public dashboards displaying data on the complaints, instances of uses of force, and traffic stop data.

  • Supporting state legislation to amend the MPIA to increase transparency related to discipline cases.

  • Conducting independent analysis and review of Department hiring and recruitment practices.

  • Expanding the scope and duration of Equitable Policing Workgroup.

The SMART Policing Act will be officially introduced during the County Council session held on Tuesday, September 8, 2020.


Cross-functional experts to recommend improvements, enhance transparency

County Executive Johnny Olszewski today announced the full membership of his new blue ribbon commission tasked with studying the County budget process.

The Baltimore County Commission on Fiscal Sustainability, which Olszewski created on his first day in office, is tasked with developing recommendations to improve fiscal sustainability and identify opportunities for enhanced transparency and increased public engagement in the budgeting process.

“This group of fiscal and policy experts are some of the best and brightest from across our state and are uniquely qualified to help us streamline and reform the County’s budgeting process,” said Olszewski. 

The seven-member Commission on Fiscal Sustainability consists of four voting members appointed by the County Executive:

  • Carolyn Colvin, Former Acting Commissioner of the  United States Social Security Administration
  • Lester Davis, Deputy Chief of Staff and Director of the Office of Policy & Communications, Office of Baltimore City Council President Bernard C. “Jack” Young
  • Warren Deschenaux, Former Executive Director, Maryland Department of Legislative Services 
  • Don Mohler, Former Baltimore County Executive

As well as three voting members selected by the County Council:

  • Edwin Crawford, Former Managing Partner, Lyons Investment Group
  • Elizabeth Irwin, Deputy County Auditor, Baltimore County
  • Edward Walters, Vice President, Head of Managed Accounts, T. Rowe Price

“Our annual budget is the blueprint that sets our priorities and charts the course for County government, and we can only benefit from inviting outside experts and the public to offer fresh perspectives and help us identify opportunities for improvement,” said County Council Chairman Tom Quirk.

The volunteer members will serve one-year terms at the pleasure of the County Executive. The commission will issue interim recommendations to the County Executive by February 15, 2019, in time to be considered as part of the FY 20 budget cycle. Final recommendations are due by May 15, 2019.

The Commission’s first meeting will be held Tuesday, January 15, at 10:00 a.m. in Room 118 of the Historic Courthouse, 400 Washington Avenue, Towson, MD 21204. 


Event to be Streamed Live on County Website

This Monday morning at 10 a.m., the County will host the official inaugural ceremonies of the elected officials of Baltimore County government. The event, which is taking place at SECU Arena at Towson University, will be streamed live on the Baltimore County website, beginning at 10 a.m. on Monday.

County Executive Don Mohler will serve as Master of Ceremonies for the inaugural ceremonies, which will feature Administrative Judge Kathleen Gallogly Cox administering the oath of office to Clerk of the Court Julie Ensor, who then will administer oaths of office to the other County elected officials, including the following:

County Executive: 
John A. Olszewski, Jr.

County Council:
Tom Quirk, Izzy Patoka, A. Wade Kach, Julian E. Jones, Jr., David Marks, Cathy Bevins and Todd Crandell 

Judges of the Circuit Court:
Carey Deeley, Michael Finifter, Ruth Jakubowski and Dennis Robinson

Clerk of the Circuit Court:
Julie Ensor

Register of Wills:
Grace G. Connolly

Judges of the Orphans Court:
William R. Evans, Juliet G. Fisher and Arthur M. Frank

Sheriff:
R. Jay Fisher

Baltimore County Board of Education:

Kathleen S. Causey, Roger B. Hayden, Julie C. Henn, Moalie S. Jose, Russell T. Kuehn, Lisa A. Mack, Rod McMillion, John H. Offerman Jr., Cheryl E. Pasteur, Lily P. Rowe and Makeda Scott


 
 
Revised September 11, 2017