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Keyword: sheriff r. jay fisher

Newly Inaugurated Council, Judges and Other Officials Begin their Terms

John Olszewski, Jr. was sworn in today as Baltimore County’s fourteenth County Executive, vowing to create a more modern, transparent and open government while enhancing Baltimore County’s quality of life, strengthening the delivery of public services, and leading with innovation. More than one thousand invited guests, elected officials, County employees and members of the public celebrated the inauguration of local government officials in the executive, legislative and judicial branches.

Inaugural Ceremonies

The inaugural ceremonies took place at Towson University’s SECU Arena at 10 a.m. today with Administrative Judge Kathleen Gallogly Cox administering the oath of office to Clerk of the Court Julie Ensor, who then administered oaths of office to the other elected officials including Judges of the Circuit Court Carey Deeley, Michael Finifter, Ruth Jakubowski and Dennis Robinson; Judges of the Orphans Court William Evans, Juliet Fisher and Arthur Frank; Sheriff R. Jay Fisher; Register of Wills Grace Connolly; members of the Board of Education Kathleen S. Causey, Roger B. Hayden, Julie C. Henn, Moalie S. Jose, Russell T. Kuehn, Lisa A. Mack, Rod McMillion, John H. Offerman Jr., Cheryl E. Pasteur, Lily P. Rowe and Makeda Scott; and the members of the County Council.

In the legislative branch, one new member of the Baltimore County Council, Izzy Patoka, took the oath of office along with six incumbents. The County Council members are 1st District Councilman Tom Quirk, 2nd District Councilman Izzy Patoka, 3rd District Councilman Wade Kach, 4th District Councilman Julian Jones, Jr., 5th District Councilman David Marks, 6th District Councilwoman Cathy Bevins, and 7th District Councilman Todd Crandell.

“I’m excited and looking forward to a very bright future for the County, and can’t wait to get started working with the Olszewski administration to maintain Baltimore County’s reputation of fiscal responsibility and excellent service to our constituents,” said County Council Chair Jones.

“I am humbled and honored to begin this journey, and I am ready to hit the ground running, work with my colleagues, and put communities first as we build a better Baltimore County together,” said County Executive Olszewski. 

The full text of County Executive Olszewski’s inaugural remarks, as prepared, are available on the County website.


Event to be Streamed Live on County Website

This Monday morning at 10 a.m., the County will host the official inaugural ceremonies of the elected officials of Baltimore County government. The event, which is taking place at SECU Arena at Towson University, will be streamed live on the Baltimore County website, beginning at 10 a.m. on Monday.

County Executive Don Mohler will serve as Master of Ceremonies for the inaugural ceremonies, which will feature Administrative Judge Kathleen Gallogly Cox administering the oath of office to Clerk of the Court Julie Ensor, who then will administer oaths of office to the other County elected officials, including the following:

County Executive: 
John A. Olszewski, Jr.

County Council:
Tom Quirk, Izzy Patoka, A. Wade Kach, Julian E. Jones, Jr., David Marks, Cathy Bevins and Todd Crandell 

Judges of the Circuit Court:
Carey Deeley, Michael Finifter, Ruth Jakubowski and Dennis Robinson

Clerk of the Circuit Court:
Julie Ensor

Register of Wills:
Grace G. Connolly

Judges of the Orphans Court:
William R. Evans, Juliet G. Fisher and Arthur M. Frank

Sheriff:
R. Jay Fisher

Baltimore County Board of Education:

Kathleen S. Causey, Roger B. Hayden, Julie C. Henn, Moalie S. Jose, Russell T. Kuehn, Lisa A. Mack, Rod McMillion, John H. Offerman Jr., Cheryl E. Pasteur, Lily P. Rowe and Makeda Scott


Full Deployment is On Time and Within Budget

Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz announced today that the County has successfully completed its aggressive schedule of equipping all uniformed police officers with body-worn cameras.

“Our police and information technology professionals implemented this important transparency initiative in a thorough and expedited manner,” said Kamenetz. “I appreciate the concerted efforts of our many partners including the Fraternal Order of Police Lodge Number 4, State’s Attorney Scott Shellenberger and Sheriff R. Jay Fisher. We received valuable input from many stakeholders including the NAACP, ACLU, National Alliance on Mental Illness, and representatives from the Latino community and other community groups.”

In the fall of 2015, Kamenetz and Police Department leaders decided to move forward with deploying the cameras, despite recommendations of a workgroup to wait and continue studying the complex legal and operational issues related to the cameras, data storage and privacy. “Waiting wasn’t a good option because these cameras are such a valuable tool in strengthening the relationship of trust and understanding with the community. By objectively capturing the actions of officers in the field, they improve transparency and help reduce complaints against officers and facilitate more efficient, effective prosecutions,” Kamenetz said.

In October of 2016, County Executive Kamenetz acted to accelerate the full implementation of the body camera program by fourteen months by increasing overtime funds to triple the rate of officer training. 

“The body-worn camera program has already proven helpful in a number of arrests and prosecutions, and as we move forward we are committed to adapting our program as best practices and new issues may evolve,” said Police Chief Terrence B. Sheridan.

“Body cameras are a valuable law enforcement tool that helps to protect officers and the public alike, and I think that County Executive Kamenetz was wise to move forward quickly with equipping our officers,” said County Council Chairman Tom Quirk.  

Program Costs

The first five years of the program will cost $7.1 million. That includes $1.25 million for the cameras and related equipment and $5.9 million for maintenance and storage. The annual cost of running the BWC program is estimated at $1.6 million, including ongoing officer training and the cost of hiring at least 21 additional full-time personnel in several departments to manage the program.

Video Storage and Access

Since the Body Worn Camera program was initiated in 2015, the County has processed more than 250,000 recordings including 45,000 hours of video and has transferred more than 79,000 files to the States Attorney’s Office (67,000 videos and 11,800 photographs).   

Storage and maintenance of massive amounts of video, and responding to public information requests are challenges requiring dedicated human resources support. Baltimore County’s implementation program included the hiring of additional IT support staff, evidence specialists, criminal records processors, forensic specialists, attorneys, training personnel and public information specialists.

Public Information Laws

Body camera video is treated the same as any other public record, subject to release under the Maryland Public Information Act and other relevant laws. Video footage of incidents also assists in resolving investigations by insurance companies, attorneys, the Motor Vehicle Administration and others through the Maryland Public Information Act.

The program includes public outreach to ensure that citizens are aware that these videos are public records, and that citizens as well as police will be portrayed.


 
 
Revised September 11, 2017