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Baltimore County News

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Keyword: sewer

Caused by Pipe Damaged Due to Storms and Stream Erosion

Baltimore County’s Department of Public Works has reported a sanitary sewer overflow in the Sudbrook Park neighborhood of western Baltimore County. The overflow occurred in the Gwynns Falls (west of Silver Creek Road and north of Milford Mill Road) where a 33-inch diameter pipe was damaged due to storms and stream erosion.

The damaged pipe was reported at approximately noon on Tuesday, May 28 by a resident. County utility crews responded and set up a pump around. The pump around was completed at 4:30 a.m. on Wednesday, May 29 and the overflow was halted in the off-road area. Overflow volume is estimated at approximately 500,000 gallons. The damaged pipe, a gravity sewer line crossing the stream, is about 60 feet long. The line was inspected in 2016 and at that time considered to have a low risk of failure.

The Baltimore County Department of Health will post health warnings in the area and will issue water contact advisories when necessary on the Department’s website.


By Gerald Chambers, Baltimore County Department of Public Works

This holiday season, grease is definitely not the word in the kitchen.

Fats, oils and grease (F.O.G.) poured into kitchen sinks can back up the County’s sewage system. Whether you’re the holiday cook or preparing meals in a restaurant, you can help prevent health and safety problems. 

The primary F.O.G. sources are everyday foods such as cooking oil, sauces, butter, and shortening. These ingredients make their way into the sewage collection system through kitchen drains. Once inside the system, fats, oils and grease will cool, harden and begin to coat the inside of the sewer pipes. Over time, F.O.G. buildup will clog pipes, restrict the flow of wastewater and result in sewage overflows and/or basement backups. These overflows result in raw sewage overflowing into our streets, parks and homes, exposing the public to harmful disease-causing micro-organisms. In cases of backups on private property, the property owner is often responsible for the cleanup costs.

Here’s how to “Cease the Grease.”

  • Never pour F.O.G. into your sink. Instead, put F.O.G. into a small can and store in the freezer until full. When it’s full, throw the can into the trash.
  • When there is F.O.G. residue in a pan or on a dish, wipe it with a paper towel before washing and throw the towel in the trash.
  • Place a strainer in the kitchen sink drain to catch food scraps and other solids, then empty the strainer into the trash.

These few simple changes every day can help keep our systems flowing all year long.

Baltimore County’s “Cease the Grease” program was created to help prevent sewage overflows and basement backups resulting from fats, oils and grease. For residential customers, Baltimore County is implementing a public education program consisting of educational outreach, informational F.O.G. flyers and a page on the County’s website. For commercial food service establishments, the County enforces F.O.G. requirements under the Food Service Facility Regulations.

For more information, call 410-887-1836 or e-mail utilities@baltimorecountymd.gov.


Approximately 17,500 Gallons Released into Tributary of Herring Run

Baltimore County’s Department of Public Works has reported a sanitary sewer overflow in the 6600 block of Collinsdale Road in the Parkville-Hillendale area (east of Loch Raven Boulevard and south of Taylor Avenue). A discharge from a sewer line of 17,500 gallons began yesterday (Thursday, September 6) at 2:55 p.m. Utility crews responded immediately and stopped the overflow at 11:55 p.m.

The sanitary sewerage discharge was caused by a broken sewer main. Crews located the break and set up a pump-around, which halted the flow shortly before midnight. Some of the discharge flowed to a tributary of Herring Run. 

Baltimore County Department of Health inspectors investigated the area and observed no signs of sewage in any publicly accessible areas. The overflow site is in a wooded area, which is difficult to reach and mostly surrounded by fencing. Therefore, no alert/advisory signs were posted and no water sampling will be conducted at this time.

When water contact advisories are necessary, they are posted on the Department of Health website at http://www.baltimorecountymd.gov/Agencies/health/environmentalhealth/watersampling/alertadvisory.html


 
 
Revised September 11, 2017