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Baltimore County News

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Keyword: seniors

By Donna Bilz, Baltimore County Department of Aging

The benefits of exercise go beyond just physical wellbeing. Exercise helps support emotional and mental health, according to the National Institute on Aging. So next time you’re feeling down, anxious, or stressed,  get up and start moving!

Physical activity can help:

  • Reduce feelings of depression and stress, while improving your mood and overall emotional well-being.
  • Increase your energy level.
  • Improve sleep.
  • Empower you to feel more in control.

Exercise and physical activity could also improve or maintain some aspects of cognitive function, such as your ability to shift quickly between tasks, plan an activity, and ignore irrelevant information.

Exercise ideas to help you lift your mood

  • Dancing, walking, bicycling, or dancing. Endurance activities increase your breathing, get your heart pumping, and also boost chemicals in your body that may improve mood.
  • Yoga. A mind and body practice that typically combines physical postures, breathing exercises, and relaxation.
  • Tai Chi. A “moving meditation” that involves shifting the body slowly, gently and precisely, while breathing deeply.
  • Activities you enjoy. Whether it’s gardening, dancing, playing tennis, or kicking around a soccer ball with your grandchildren, choose an activity you want to do, not have to do.

70s Dance Party at Oregon Ridge May 22

Feel great -- get up and dance! The Baltimore County Department of Aging is celebrating its 40th Anniversary this year, so we’re throwing it back to the 70s.

Come celebrate with BCDA at the Concert in the Park at the Oregon Ridge Park Concert Pavilion on May 22, 2018, 11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m., rain or shine.

Come dressed in your best 70’s gear. Bring a plain white t-shirt to take part in our free tie-dye station. Rock out to the headlining band the Grand Jury, back by popular demand with a tribute to the 70s. Enjoy a fun-filled afternoon with door prizes, trivia, raffles, classic cars from the 70s, and more.

Bring picnic food, lawn chairs, blankets, and your beverages of choice. Cruiser’s Pit Beef food truck will be on-site vending fresh pit beef, pit ham, burgers and beverages.

Tickets on Sale Now

Tickets are available at all Baltimore County Department of Aging Senior Centers for $4.00 prior to the event, $5.00 at the gate. Call your local senior center or Maryland Access Point of Baltimore County for details.

We can’t wait to see you there!

May is Older Americans’ Month. The Baltimore County Department of Aging (BCDA) offers everyone a chance to “Engage At Every Age,” this month and every month.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Show Airs on Cable Channel 25 and Online

The latest edition of Baltimore County’s half-hour cable television public affairs show, “Hello Baltimore County,” features the County’s new College Promise program, an initiative to connect job-seekers with good jobs in growing fields, plus the Department of Aging’s array of programs and services for seniors and their families.

Baltimore County’s College Promise Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz and CCBC President Sandra Kurtinitis explain how the County is making CCBC tuition-free for eligible students.

Connect to a Better Job – Let Baltimore County’s new Job Connector initiative help you get job-ready to work in a growth industry.

40 Years Serving Seniors – Baltimore County’s Department of Aging is 40 and serving today’s seniors with more programs and services than ever.

You can also view the show on the County website’s Hello Baltimore County page. In addition to online access, the program runs several times per week on Cable Channel 25, in Baltimore County, at the following times:

Mondays: 1:30 p.m., 6 p.m., 10 p.m.

Tuesdays: 12 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 9 p.m.

Wednesdays: 11 a.m., 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 10 p.m.

Thursdays: 1 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 8 p.m.

Fridays: 11 a.m., 6 p.m.

Saturdays: 10 a.m., 12 p.m., 3 p.m., 7 p.m., 10:30 p.m.

Sundays: 10 a.m., 12 p.m., 3 p.m., 7 p.m., 10:30 p.m.


by Michael Schneider, Baltimore County Recreation and Parks

When Evelyn Schroedl was growing up, her favorite tennis pro was Helen Wills Moody. Don’t know the name? Helen Wills Moody was the number one rated women’s tennis player in the world in 1927. Her fan Evelyn was 10 years old.  

We caught up with Evelyn Schroedl shortly after one of her many 100th birthday celebrations.  A vivacious and animated tennis advocate and player, Evelyn doesn’t just enjoy watching the sport and attending the U.S. Open, she plays in a weekly game at the Baltimore County Recreation and Parks Northeast Regional Recreation Center (NERRC) in Parkville. 

Long a spectator, Evelyn is a relative newcomer to playing the sport. When she retired from her career as a Goucher College registrar in 1981, she started tennis lessons at what is now the Community College of Baltimore County Essex campus. “I’ve had such marvelous experiences playing tennis,” she shared. “Tennis has been a wonderful social opportunity to meet and play with lots of people over the years. I even played a Goucher College professor,” she reveals with a smile.

Tennis at NERRC is now a weekly event for Evelyn. Watching the competition take place with friends Nancy Tilotta, Clara Hall and Carol Koh, Evelyn’s serve and rallies were on, she displayed a fine forehand and a smooth return. With a touch of macular degeneration, Evelyn confided that it isn’t always as easy to see the ball. She encourages all to “give it a shot…you don’t have to be a star!”

On keeping fit to be 100

“I was 78 when my husband died and I thought life was over. But my first time ever in a senior center, Seven Oaks Senior Center, saved my life.” Being with others and active in programs gave her focus and meaning during that life transition and beyond.

While tennis is important in the life of this 100 year old, Evelyn also plays bridge three nights a week, paints one night a week, shoots pool, reads, watches television and is active in charities. Watch Evelyn rappel down a 27-story building to help raise funds for kidney research. Of course, this was much earlier in her life – at age 96. 

“I’ve never thought of taking good care of myself, it just happened” said Evelyn. A resident of Oak Crest Village, she recalls taking a weight training course with ten men. “It was a great time,” she states with a huge smile on her face. “The gym, on the other hand, is boring.” 

What’s Evelyn Schroedl’s secret to living and thriving at 100?  “Because I was born in 1917,” she replied with a contagious giggle.  


 
 
Revised September 11, 2017