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Keyword: johnny olszewski

Digital speed signs are in response to concerns raised at town hall meeting

County Executive Johnny Olszewski and 5th District Councilman David Marks announced jointly that the County Department of Public Works will initiate a traffic calming pilot program that will position digital speed signs around the County to help mitigate high-speed drivers in residential neighborhoods as part of a comprehensive traffic calming strategy.

“Councilman Marks and I heard loud and clear at last week’s town hall meeting that our residents are very concerned about drivers speeding through their neighborhoods,” Olszewski said. “Councilman Marks has advocated for using digital speed monitoring systems to slow down drivers and I am pleased that we are moving ahead with a pilot program,” Olszewski said. 

“Traffic safety was a major concern raised at the fifth district town hall meeting,” Marks said. I commend County Executive Olszewski for working so quickly to create this pilot program on speed sign technology.”

The pilot program will deploy one digital speed monitoring system in each of the County’s seven councilmatic districts with the results to be reviewed by traffic experts in the Department of Public Works. The timeline and logistical details of the pilot program are currently in development. 

Currently the Police Department has five portable digital speed monitoring signs that are placed as needed at locations around the County. This new pilot program will enhance these efforts. 


Olszewski encourages people to follow updates on Twitter

County Executive Johnny Olszewski has been briefed by DPW officials on the County’s readiness to respond to winter storms, including the snow event forecast for this weekend.

“Protecting public safety is the top priority when winter weather hits,” Olszewski said. “Our crews are well-trained and our equipment is in good shape so we are ready at the first flake to get the roads salted and plowed as quickly as possible, and we ask for people’s patience as our crews work the storm.”

Real-time Storm Updates Available on Social Media and County Website

Residents and the travelling public can get updated information about Baltimore County’s snow removal operations and road conditions online:

24 hours after the precipitation has stopped, residents may report storm-related issues like unplowed streets using the:

  • BaltCoGo mobile app
  • Baltimorecountymd.gov/stormfighter “Report Now” feature
  • Bureau of Highways phone number 410-887-3560

The County Stormfighter web page provides a link to live traffic camera feeds from the Maryland Department of Transportation’s Coordinated Highways Action Response Team (CHART). It also offers a link to the County’s list of road closures, which provides details on roads that are currently closed due to repairs, accidents, weather or other hazards. This list is updated frequently, so people are advised to check back often for the latest status. State roads and interstates are not included. Information on those roads can be found on the Maryland Department of Transportation’s travel advisories and road closures web page at http://www.chart.md.gov/TravInfo/Default.aspx.

Salting and Plowing Operations

The County stores 91,600 tons of salt in 17 salt barns around the County and replenishes those supplies throughout the winter as needed. The Department of Public Works stands ready to respond with 529 trucks and 554 personnel working from 11 highways shops, plus contractors as needed. The County has budgeted $9 million for storm response for the 2018-2019 season.

In an average snowfall of two to four inches, it takes four to six hours for crews to spread the first application of salt on all County roads. That first application of salt is critical to prevent the snow from bonding to the pavement. With accumulations of less than six inches, crews can generally plow every street within 24 hours after the storm has ended. With a storm of six inches or more, it takes 48 hours or more after the storm has ended to get through every street.

Snowplows start with main County arteries like Joppa Road, Rolling Road, Dundalk Avenue and Owings Mills Boulevard. They then plow feeder roads like Goucher Boulevard and Lyons Mill Road, and move into neighborhood streets including courts and cul de sacs as conditions permit. During a very heavy snowfall, plows may need to be diverted from neighborhood roads to concentrate on keeping main roads open.

Snow Equipment is Inspected, Serviced and Ready to Go

The County’s snow-fighting equipment is in storm-ready condition thanks to the Department of Public Works’ systematic fleet inspection and maintenance program. When snow is forecast, snow plow repairs are given priority over routine equipment maintenance to ensure that they operational.


Cross-functional experts to recommend improvements, enhance transparency

County Executive Johnny Olszewski today announced the full membership of his new blue ribbon commission tasked with studying the County budget process.

The Baltimore County Commission on Fiscal Sustainability, which Olszewski created on his first day in office, is tasked with developing recommendations to improve fiscal sustainability and identify opportunities for enhanced transparency and increased public engagement in the budgeting process.

“This group of fiscal and policy experts are some of the best and brightest from across our state and are uniquely qualified to help us streamline and reform the County’s budgeting process,” said Olszewski. 

The seven-member Commission on Fiscal Sustainability consists of four voting members appointed by the County Executive:

  • Carolyn Colvin, Former Acting Commissioner of the  United States Social Security Administration
  • Lester Davis, Deputy Chief of Staff and Director of the Office of Policy & Communications, Office of Baltimore City Council President Bernard C. “Jack” Young
  • Warren Deschenaux, Former Executive Director, Maryland Department of Legislative Services 
  • Don Mohler, Former Baltimore County Executive

As well as three voting members selected by the County Council:

  • Edwin Crawford, Former Managing Partner, Lyons Investment Group
  • Elizabeth Irwin, Deputy County Auditor, Baltimore County
  • Edward Walters, Vice President, Head of Managed Accounts, T. Rowe Price

“Our annual budget is the blueprint that sets our priorities and charts the course for County government, and we can only benefit from inviting outside experts and the public to offer fresh perspectives and help us identify opportunities for improvement,” said County Council Chairman Tom Quirk.

The volunteer members will serve one-year terms at the pleasure of the County Executive. The commission will issue interim recommendations to the County Executive by February 15, 2019, in time to be considered as part of the FY 20 budget cycle. Final recommendations are due by May 15, 2019.

The Commission’s first meeting will be held Tuesday, January 15, at 10:00 a.m. in Room 118 of the Historic Courthouse, 400 Washington Avenue, Towson, MD 21204. 


 
 
Revised September 11, 2017