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Baltimore County News

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Keyword: health department

Show Airs on Cable Channel 25 and Online

The latest edition of Baltimore County’s half-hour cable television public affairs show, “Hello Baltimore County,” spotlights Baltimore County’s golf courses, a conversation with Baltimore County Executive Don Mohler, and the importance of vaccines for everyone.

Meet Baltimore County Executive Don Mohler – Don Mohler, elected by the County Council to complete the term of the late Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz, discusses his priorities and goals for the County.

What’s Up Doc? – Baltimore County’s top doc, Dr. Gregory Wm. Branch and his staff highlight the importance and safety of vaccines for kids and adults.

Golf Baltimore County! – Find out how you can “play more and pay less” at Baltimore County’s five beautiful golf courses.

You can also view the show on the County website’s Hello Baltimore County page. In addition to online access, the program runs several times per week on Cable Channel 25, in Baltimore County, at the following times:

Mondays: 1:30 p.m., 6 p.m., 10 p.m.

Tuesdays: 12 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 9 p.m.

Wednesdays: 11 a.m., 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 10 p.m.

Thursdays: 1 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 8 p.m.

Fridays: 11 a.m., 6 p.m.

Saturdays: 10 a.m., 12 p.m., 3 p.m., 7 p.m., 10:30 p.m.

Sundays: 10 a.m., 12 p.m., 3 p.m., 7 p.m., 10:30 p.m.

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By Gregory Wm. Branch, M.D., MBA, CPE, FACP, Director, Baltimore County Department of Health and Human, Services          

The opioid epidemic has a tight grip on communities across the country. In Baltimore County, we are employing an array of strategies to help save lives. While the Baltimore County Department of Health is leading these strategies, it is increasingly clear that we all have a role to play in the County’s R.E.A.C.H. effort.

Recovery

Meet people where they are

The Department of Health provides specialists to help people navigate the steps to recovery. Our Certified Peer Recovery Specialists meet with clients, provide one-on-one training and assist with securing resources and services. They use caring, compassionate communication to connect with clients seeking help.

Education

Know what to do

Overdose deaths involving fentanyl are rising at an alarming rate. We all need to become familiar with the dangers of fentanyl and learn what to do if we suspect acquaintances, family members or loved ones of being at risk. Baltimore County provides free overdose response training in locations across the County each month. These trainings teach what an opioid is, how to recognize, respond to and prevent an opioid overdose and how to administer naloxone, the non-addictive medication that reverses the effects of opioids. Click here for training dates.

Assessment

Connect to services

We work diligently to help people battling addiction get the help they need to recover. The County has walk-in assessment clinics at the Eastern Family Resource Center and the Liberty Family Resource Center. Screening assessments also are conducted at all substance abuse sites and Strategic Brief Intervention and Referral Treatment is implemented at school-based wellness centers across the County.

Collaboration

Know what is in your medicine cabinet

Unused prescription drugs in the wrong hands can be lethal. Parents, grandparents and guardians must take inventory of what is in their medicine cabinets, secure all unexpired medications that are genuinely needed, and use drug drop boxes to safely dispose of those that are not. Drug drop boxes are located outside every Baltimore County police precinct and are always available. This is just one example of the County partnerships at work in our battle against substance misuse.

HELP

410-88-REACH

If you or someone you know is fighting substance misuse issues, know that there is help. Baltimore County’s 410-88-REACH (410-887-3224) is our help line and the place to call to get information about available resources, referrals and to have your questions and concerns addressed. This help line is completely confidential and is answered by specialists Monday through Saturday from 8:30 a.m. – midnight. Online information for substance use and recovery services can also be found at www.baltimorecountymd.gov/41088REACH.


County Executive Establishes Dedicated Investigative Unit

Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz announced today that the County is creating a dedicated animal abuse unit in the Baltimore County Police Department to take the lead in investigation and enforcement efforts.

“In response to community input, I asked Police Chief Sheridan and Animal Services Director Dr. Melissa Jones to review County procedures regarding the referral and priority handling of animal cruelty cases,” stated County Executive Kamenetz. “That review recommended that Baltimore County establish a specialized unit in the Baltimore County Police Department dedicated to animal abuse cases, and this unit  will be up and running by the end of the month.”

The new Animal Abuse Investigative Team will comprise a police sergeant, a police officer and three civilian investigators. Animal Services has seen an increase in the number of suspected animal abuse cases since a new state law went into effect last October, compelling veterinary practitioners to report suspicions of animal cruelty or fighting to local animal control or law enforcement agencies.

The County’s review indicated that at the present time individuals may call a variety of numbers to report animal abuse cases.  Calls are made to the local police precinct, 911, Animal Services or even the State’s Attorney’s office. Under the new procedure, all callers will be directed to call 410-887-5901 to reach the Animal Abuse Investigative Team. If the Animal Abuse Investigative Team is unable to respond for whatever reason, callers will be instructed to call 911 immediately, and 911 operators will then refer the caller to the local police precinct.  The precinct will investigate and refer the case to the Animal Abuse Investigative Team for follow-up.

“Establishing a dedicated police unit to handle suspected cases of animal abuse will be a more effective way to handle what are often very challenging cases,” said Police Chief Terrence B. Sheridan.

“The creation of this unit creates a much clearer line of communication for the public and for our employees at Animal Services,” said Melissa Jones, V.M.D., Director of Baltimore County Animal Services. “I’m very pleased to have the resources of the Police Department to investigate and fight animal cruelty in our communities.”

“I encouraged the County Executive to review all of the procedures in animal cruelty cases, and I am very pleased that he followed up,” said 1st District Councilman Tom Quirk. “This should be a much improved process.”

“The creation of a specialized unit in the Police Department to handle animal abuse will significantly improve communications between my office and the county,” said State’s Attorney Scott Shellenberger.


 
 
Revised September 11, 2017