Skip Navigation

Image of the Baltimore County Historic Courthouse

Baltimore County News

Stay informed of what's happening in Baltimore County.
Keyword: harford county

Says “Enough is enough!”

Baltimore County Executive Don Mohler issued the following statement following this morning’s workplace shooting in Aberdeen, Maryland:

Once again, a tragic act of gun violence has hit close to home as mass shootings have become the norm. Our hearts and prayers go out to the victims of such senseless violence, and to their families. But these words have begun to ring hollow as we have had 25 mass shootings in September and more than 150 this year. Enough is enough.

If as leaders and communities, we don’t demand action, and demand it now, we should be embarrassed. This country is too great, its people too good, to remain in our bunkers stuck with talking points from the right or the left. There is not a “one size fits all” solution to the gun violence epidemic. It is about mental health. And although some may not like it, it is about easy access to guns. Complex issues rarely present binary choices. They are not “either/or.” They are difficult.

“Now is not the time …” is a weak excuse to do nothing. Doing nothing at a time when gun violence is terrorizing our communities is nonsense, plain and simple. Now, more than ever, is the time to act.

We’ve never backed down from challenges in our nation, and we can’t back down now. If we pass this cancer onto the next generation, the blood will be on our hands.


Kamenetz Visits Closest Neighbors as Part of MACo Statewide Tour 

Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz, President of the Maryland Association of Counties (MACo), spent yesterday afternoon and evening meeting with Harford and Carroll County legislators in Westminster and Bel Air. He attended meetings of the Carroll County Board of Commissioners and the Harford County Council to talk about MACo’s advocacy for Maryland counties in the General Assembly session and on state and federal issues.  

At their afternoon meeting, the Carroll County Commissioners touched on a number of topics including MACo’s positive influence in Annapolis during this year’s General Assembly session and how statewide MACo conferences offer local officials a valuable opportunity to learn from each other and share best practices. Kamenetz and the commissioners talked about the importance of county elected officials coordinating with their Statehouse delegations and discussed the need for long-term treatment for opioid addiction.

Carroll County Board of Commissioners President Richard Weaver said, “It’s refreshing to have the president and senior staff of MACo come to each of the counties and give us session highlights and brief us on what MACo is doing for the counties. We need that connection between the statewide and county levels of government and the work that MACo does doesn’t go unnoticed.”

In the evening session of the Harford County Council, discussion centered around concerns about the state funding gap in Highway User Funds provided to counties, with revenues at only 10% of previous levels and tending to favor municipalities within counties. Kamenetz and the Harford Council members agreed to work together through MACo to try to find solutions to this vexing problem of cost-shifting to the localities.

“As I travel around the state I continue to find that our county governments have more in common than differences and that elected officials appreciate the opportunity to compare notes and work collaboratively to solve problems and create opportunities,” Kamenetz said.

MACo, first organized in 1939, is a non-partisan collaborative organization that advocates for the needs of local government to the Maryland General Assembly, representing all of Maryland’s 23 counties and Baltimore City. Kamenetz is the fifth Baltimore County Executive to serve as President in the history of MACo, succeeding Christian Kahl, Dale Anderson, Dutch Ruppersberger and Jim Smith. With this new term, Kamenetz also becomes the longest serving current member of MACo, first joining in 1994 as a member of the Baltimore County Council. 


 
 
Revised September 11, 2017