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Keyword: department of public works

Evening Hearing to be Held on March 21 in Downtown Towson

The Baltimore County Department of Public Works (DPW) is developing a new Ten Year Solid Waste Management Plan (Plan) to cover the 2019–2028 period. As part of the Plan development process, the DPW is holding a public hearing on Wednesday, March 21, 2018 from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. to review the full draft Plan and solicit community feedback.

The hearing will take place in the Council Chambers of the Baltimore County Historic Courthouse, located at 400 Washington Avenue in Towson. Attendees must use the Chesapeake Avenue entrance on the south side of the Historic Courthouse building.

In the event of inclement weather, residents should check the status of the Baltimore County Public Library’s Towson branch – if that branch is closed the evening of March 21, the public hearing will be postponed until Wednesday, March 28 at the Council Chambers of the Baltimore County Historic Courthouse.

A public information session, presented by representatives of Baltimore County’s DPW, will precede the formal hearing. Copies of the draft Plan are available on the County’s website at, in the office of the Bureau of Solid Waste Management at 111 West Chesapeake Avenue, Towson, Maryland 21204 (County Office Building), and at every branch of the Baltimore County Public Library system.

In addition to the public hearing, people may submit written comments on the draft Plan to Steven A. Walsh, P.E., Director, Department of Public Works, 111 West Chesapeake Avenue, Towson, MD 21204. Comments must be received within 35 days of the public hearing.

For more information regarding the public hearing or the Solid Waste Management Plan, email or call 410-887-2000.

Closed in 2014, a New Span will be Completed by Mid-Year

Baltimore County will rebuild a popular pedestrian bridge along a walking path that leads from Dogwood Road to Woodlawn High School and the Woodlawn branch of the Baltimore County Public Library. Construction is scheduled to begin on or about February 23. The original span, which crossed Dead Run, was closed in August, 2014 because of serious deterioration and then taken down in September of that year. A new structure is expected to be completed in June.

“This pedestrian bridge has been greatly missed by the community and we are pleased to respond by rebuilding an improved bridge and path that is safe and accessible to people in wheelchairs,” said Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz. “By continuing to invest in our infrastructure and older communities, we ensure that people can continue to enjoy a good quality of life in Baltimore County.” 

The original footbridge, constructed in 1973, was a fifty-foot long, single-span, steel-frame bridge. The replacement structure is of similar length and will be fabricated primarily of aluminum, and, therefore more resistant to winter salting, which shortened the service life of the 1973 span.

“People in the neighborhoods near the school and library have used this bridge for decades, and I very much appreciate Baltimore County Executive Kamenetz’s efforts to secure funding for this important local project,” said County Council Chair Julian E. Jones, Jr.

Woodlawn High’s new pedestrian bridge, estimated to cost $400,000, has been designed to include a concrete deck and approach embankments which are compliant with Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) standards.

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Replacement Bridge was Completed in Six Months, Despite Weather Delays 

The replacement Gwynnbrook Avenue bridge in Owings Mills is opening today prior to afternoon rush hour traffic. Department of Public Works engineers closed the previous bridge, spanning a tributary of the Gwynns Falls between Owings Mills Boulevard and Garrison Forrest Road, in December 2016, when inspectors identified safety concerns related to diminished structural integrity. The reopening is important to the community because this bridge carries some 7,000 vehicles per day.  

Construction of the replacement bridge had been underway since last July and included the relocation of utilities and a stream diversion to maintain the tributary’s flow as the project proceeded. A water line, which runs through Gwynnbrook Avenue, was then relocated to permit construction, and the old, 23-foot long bridge was demolished.

The new Gwynnbrook Avenue bridge is a two-lane, single-span, pre-stressed concrete, slab bridge. It is roughly square in outline: fifty feet long and fifty-three feet wide with sidewalks on both sides. Construction costs were about $2.6 million, with 80 percent of the expense covered by the federal government’s bridge program. 

Revised September 11, 2017