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Keyword: crime

County Experienced Reductions in Crime Through First Six Months of 2020

Baltimore County Executive Johnny Olszewski today released a new interactive data dashboard, where residents can view detailed information about crime. The dashboard is the latest tool available to increase government transparency and accountability in Baltimore County.

“Residents deserve to know exactly what’s happening in their communities, and this dashboard shines a light on crime statistics in Baltimore County,” Olszewski said. “We’re pleased that the dashboard shows that crime is decreasing in Baltimore County, and that Baltimore County remains a safe place to live, work, and raise a family.”

The data dashboard includes County Part 1 Crime data from 2017 to present. The dashboard will be updated each month.

“We will continue to work relentlessly on building public trust in the communities that we serve. The creation of this information center increases our transparency for citizens to see and understand what is happening in their communities and within our agency,” said Baltimore County Police Chief Melissa Hyatt. “We remain committed to promoting equitable policing across Baltimore County and will continue to evolve and enhance our level of service.”

According to data through the first six months of 2020, Baltimore County reported reductions in homicides and all other major crime categories. From January 1, 2020, through June 30, 2020, Baltimore County saw the following major reductions compared to the same period in 2019:

  • Homicides: 15 percent decrease
  • Burglary: 35 percent decrease
  • Robberies: 30 percent decrease
  • Assault: 24 percent decrease
  • Theft: 23 percent decrease
  • Motor Vehicle Theft: 15 percent decrease

No Part 1 crime categories saw year-over-year increases.

“Ensuring the safety of our communities is one of our most important responsibilities and I want to applaud Chief Hyatt and the Baltimore County Police Department for their bravery, service, and progress,” Olszewski added. “Early in the new year, I introduced a series of interventions to enhance the safety of our communities, changes which are already showing significant progress. Moving ahead, we will continue to innovate to make sure Baltimore County’s neighborhoods remain safe.”

The interactive crime data dashboard released today joins Baltimore County’s growing set of resources for residents that provide greater transparency, reflecting Olszewski’s unprecedented commitment to a more transparent and accountable government.

Earlier this year, Olszewski launched BCSTAT, a data-driven performance management program that aims to improve performance, ensure data quality, enhance transparency and increase accountability across government.

Baltimore County has also released a number of downloadable raw data-sets related to numerous government functions and services. Open Data also includes access to the “My Neighborhood” interactive mapping application, which allows residents to select, view and print predefined maps and reports about Baltimore County, such as police precincts, enterprise zones or census information.

In 2019, the Olszewski Administration released the Baltimore County Open Budget platform to empower residents to explore the County’s budget in an online, easily understood format. The platform currently features information on current and prior year’s budgets, including revenue and expenditures for both operating and capital expenses.

As part of a recent package of reforms to improve transparency and accountability in the Baltimore County Police Department, the Olszewski Administration announced plans to build public dashboards displaying data on the number and disposition of complaints against police officers, instances of uses of force and traffic stop data broken down by race. These dashboards will be released in the coming weeks.


Kamenetz lauds police department for quick results

Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz announced that the Baltimore County Police Department captured three out-of-state males overnight who are suspects in the recent rash of burglaries in the Falls Road corridor.  The County Executive issued the following statement:

“Once again the men and women of the Baltimore County Police Department sent a very strong message to criminals:  if you break the law in our county, you will be arrested and you will be prosecuted.  I am very proud of Chief Sheridan and the men and women of the Baltimore County Police Department.  They are simply the best.”


Commission for Women Sub-Group to Coordinate Education and Criminal Justice Approaches 

Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz announced today that the Baltimore County Commission for Women will establish a cross-functional work group to address the complex issue of human trafficking in coordination with the County’s Criminal Justice Coordinating Council. The work group will take a victim-centered approach as they work to reduce trafficking and protect victims by providing them with the resources they need in partnership with a variety of organizations, including non-profits and regional counterparts across the state.

"Human trafficking is a horrific practice that has absolutely no place in Baltimore County or anywhere,” said Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz. “The vulnerable women, children and men who are victimized need our help and protection and we plan to work together to quickly identify actions we can take to address this challenging problem.”

The work group will select a member to be a permanent member of the County’s Criminal Justice Coordinating Council (CJCC) and the Chair of the CJCC will approve the membership of the work group, which will be comprised of a team of professionals and individuals from the Commission for Women and representatives from law enforcement, education, social services and the health and legal fields. Individual members must be County residents with a proven history and involvement in public advocacy. 

The Criminal Justice Coordinating Council’s Leadership Role

The CJCC membership includes the Baltimore County Chief of Police, Sheriff, State’s Attorney, Chief Administrative Judges of the Circuit and District Courts, Public Defender, Department of Corrections Director, Director of Health and Human Services, School Superintendent and the Criminal Justice Coordinator; as well as the Regional Director of the Maryland Department of Juvenile Services and the Community Supervision Director of the Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services and others.  

The CJCC provides coordinated leadership to establish cohesive criminal justice strategies, policies and programs; identifies deficiencies, and formulates policy, plans and programs for improvement. They also collaborate to maximize resources and raise funds to support criminal justice programs.  

A Focus on Victims

The Human Trafficking Work Group will be committed to a victim-centered approach and is charged with recommending a more comprehensive, specialized and coordinated response to victims’ long-term needs, including a review of coordination related to State policies and protocols.

Commission for Women President, Bella Santos Owens, said, “Six years ago, when only a few were talking in our community about human trafficking, we were already raising awareness on this issue. The Commission for Women knew that behind the silence are the struggles of real human beings. We persisted. We are very proud that an official work group has been formed by the County – upon the Commission’s proposal – dedicated to finding the gaps that exist between human trafficking victim services and policies. This confirms our view that human trafficking is a crime that is in our backyard and needs to be addressed.”

About Human Trafficking

Baltimore County ranks third in Maryland in occurrences of human trafficking, behind Baltimore City and Prince George’s County, according to the Maryland Department of Human Services. The National Human Trafficking Hotline received 30,918 reports in 2016. The International Labor Organization estimates that human trafficking is a $150 billion industry worldwide.

More information about human trafficking is available through the National Human Trafficking Hotline, at 1-888-373-7888, where you can learn about the types and signs of human trafficking.

If someone suspects human trafficking activity in Baltimore County, they are advised to call 9-1-1 to report their concerns. 


 
 
Revised September 11, 2017