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Keyword: cpr

Show Airs on Cable Channel 25 and Online

The latest edition of Baltimore County’s half-hour cable television public affairs show, “Hello Baltimore County,” offers an overview of the County’s winter storm response, resources for people who need help paying energy bills and a quick life-saving CPR demonstration.

Winter Storm Response – Learn all about the County’s winter storm operations and how you can help.

CPR is Easier than Ever! – No more complicated counting or breaths… find out how hands-only CPR and automatic defibrillators make saving a life simpler than ever.

Need Help Paying Your Energy Bills? – Find out about assistance available through the Baltimore County Office of Home Energy Programs.

You can also view the show on the County website’s Hello Baltimore County page. In addition to online access, the program runs several times per week on Cable Channel 25 in Baltimore County, at the following times:

Mondays: 1:30 p.m., 6 p.m., 10 p.m.

Tuesdays: 12 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 9 p.m.

Wednesdays: 11 a.m., 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 10 p.m.

Thursdays: 1 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 8 p.m.

Fridays: 11 a.m., 6 p.m.

Saturdays: 10 a.m., 12 p.m., 3 p.m., 7 p.m., 10:30 p.m.

Sundays: 10 a.m., 12 p.m., 3 p.m., 7 p.m., 10:30 p.m.


Show Airs on Cable Channel 25 and Online

The latest edition of Baltimore County’s half-hour cable television public affairs show, “Hello Baltimore County,” offers a quick life-saving CPR demonstration, an overview of the resources available to help address opioid addiction and a visit to the County’s animal shelter.

CPR is Easier than Ever! – No more complicated counting or breaths… find out how hands-only CPR and automatic defibrillators make saving a life simpler than ever before.

What’s Up Doc?  - Baltimore County’s top doc, Dr. Gregory Wm. Branch explains why opioid overdose rates are worse than ever and describes the help that is available.

Animal Services - A National Model of CareLearn about Baltimore County Animal Services’ record adoption rates, low-cost spay/neuter procedures, state-of-the-art shelter and much more.  

You can also view the show on the County website’s Hello Baltimore County page. In addition to online access, the program runs several times per week on Cable Channel 25 in Baltimore County, at the following times:

Mondays: 1:30 p.m., 6 p.m., 10 p.m.

Tuesdays: 12 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 9 p.m.

Wednesdays: 11 a.m., 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 10 p.m.

Thursdays: 1 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 8 p.m.

Fridays: 11 a.m., 6 p.m.

Saturdays: 10 a.m., 12 p.m., 3 p.m., 7 p.m., 10:30 p.m.

Sundays: 10 a.m., 12 p.m., 3 p.m., 7 p.m., 10:30 p.m.


Event promotes hands-only CPR

Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz hosted a packed house this morning when he presented a Baltimore County Hero Pin to County housing inspector Phil Walker, who is credited with saving the life of an employee of a Pikesville condominium.

Last November, Walker had completed a routine HUD inspection at 130 Slade Avenue Condominium in Pikesville when he spotted a man lying outside the building. Finding him to be non-responsive he immediately called 911 and began administering chest compressions until he was relieved by Baltimore County paramedics.

The victim, Patrick O’Hara, has made a full recovery and continues in his position as a maintenance person working for 130 Slade Avenue Condominium. Phil Walker, a Navy veteran, lives in Baltimore City and works for the Baltimore County Department of Permits, Approvals and Inspections as a Code Inspection and Enforcement Officer.

“We couldn’t be prouder of our County employee Phil Walker, whose quick thinking and decisive actions saved another man’s life,” said Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz. “CPR is simpler than it’s ever been, and you never know when you might find yourself in a similar situation, so it’s important for everyone to learn the simple technique of hands-only CPR,” he said.

EMS Lt. Gentry Fitzpatrick, who responded to the incident, conducted a demonstration of hands-only CPR and promoted this easy, life-saving technique. The County Fire Department’s “Lend a Hand. Save a Life.” campaign encourages average citizens to learn the three simple steps of responding to a victim of sudden cardiac arrest:

  1. Call 911.  
  2. Push hard on the center of the chest.
  3. If possible, use a portable defibrillator, also known as an AED, which are located in many public places.

The pin presentation ceremony was attended by friends, family and co-workers of Mr. Walker and Mr. O’Hara, as well as a number of first responders and 911 Center staff members who participated in the emergency call.  


 
 
Revised September 11, 2017