Skip Navigation

Image of the Baltimore County Historic Courthouse

Baltimore County News

Stay informed of what's happening in Baltimore County.
Keyword: chief sheridan

Retains Many in Key Leadership Positions

County Executive John Olszewski, Jr. announced today that he plans to retain a significant number of current County officials as members of his government leadership team. He has nominated the following individuals to serve as County department and office heads, subject to confirmation by an affirmative vote of a majority of the members of the County Council:

  • Laura D. Riley, Director, Department of Aging (currently serves as Deputy Director)
  • Keith A. Dorsey, Director, Office of Budget and Finance
  • Gail M. Watts, Director, Department of Corrections
  • Michael E. Field, County Attorney
  • William G. Anderson, Director, Department of Economic and Workforce Development
  • Gregory Wm. Branch, M.D., Director, Department of Health and Human Services, Department of Social Services and Health Officer
  • Robert W. O'Connor, Director, Office of Information Technology
  • Terrence B. Sheridan, Chief, Police Department
  • Steven A. Walsh, PE, Director, Department of Public Works
  • Barry F. Williams, Director, Department of Recreation and Parks

In addition, Olszewski announced that he has nominated David Lykens to serve as Acting Director of the Department of Environmental Protection and Sustainability, where Lykens currently serves as Deputy Director.

 “These individuals have been on the front lines of serving county residents, and they are well-qualified to help us build a better Baltimore County,” Olszewski said. “As we work together to make Baltimore County more innovative, transparent and responsive to county residents, they will be empowered to lead change and modernize our government.”

Police Chief Transition

Chief Sheridan has announced that he plans to retire in six months. He will remain on the job while the County conducts a national search for his successor. Sheridan has served a total of 13 years as the County’s police chief from January 2017 to the present, and previously from 1996 to 2007. He served as Maryland State Police Superintendent from 2007 to 2011, and prior to his role as County Police Chief, he served in the Maryland State Police for 30 years.

“Chief Sheridan is a first-class public safety professional who is well-respected by his officers and the community,” said Olszewski. “We are very grateful for his service and that he has agreed to continue in his role as we take the time to select someone to replace him who will maintain the same high standards of service to our constituents and will achieve the consistently positive results we have come to expect in Baltimore County."

Dori Henry to Serve as Director of Communications

Olszewski also named Dori Henry to lead his Office of Communications, which will play an integral role in his efforts to expand government transparency and foster open communication and collaborative decision-making with residents and other stakeholders. She will begin on December 17.

Henry now serves as Communications Director for the Bloomberg American Health Initiative. Previous positions include Assistant Secretary for Public Affairs at the U.S. Department of Labor and Director of Communications at the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, now known as the Maryland Department of Health. She worked in the Civil Rights Division of the U.S. Department of Justice as a special assistant to the Assistant Attorney General, and has been a speechwriter and a reporter covering the Maryland General Assembly. She has a Master of Science degree in journalism from Boston University.


Kamenetz reports that 56% of new class is minority or female

Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz announced that the police recruit class that began this week continues to move the County forward toward his goal of ensuring that the police department reflects the communities it serves. Minorities or women comprise 56 percent of the class that began Monday, June 12; African Americans comprise 34 percent. Over the past six years, the County’s recruit classes have averaged more than 40% minority and nearly 30% female candidates, while continuing to attract an outstanding caliber of officers.

“In 2011, I made a commitment to the people of Baltimore County that we would increase the number of minorities and females in the Baltimore County Police Department,” said Kamenetz.  “As a result of these efforts, our communities are safer than ever because people have more confidence in the decisions that police officers make when the department reflects the diversity of the community.”

“Kevin Kamenetz is a man of his word,” said Bishop Dwayne C. Debnam, Pastor of the Morning Star Baptist Church. “From day one he said that he would diversify the Baltimore County Police Department, and he has done just that. This is what leadership looks like.”

“I am very proud of the concerted effort that the police department has put forth in an effort to diversify our ranks,” said Police Chief Terrence B. Sheridan. “These types of recruitment numbers don’t just happen, they are the result of a very strategic and focused effort by our recruit staff.”

The police department has used a number of traditional and non-traditional methods to attract minority and female candidates, including ads on radio, television and MTA busses; college recruitment, community information sessions and extensive outreach to community and faith-based organizations.

“There is no more important responsibility as County Executive than to make our communities safe and secure,” concluded County Executive Kamenetz. “We have outstanding men and women who protect us each and every day, and when the department reflects the County’s growing diversity, our officers and our citizens are safer.”


 
 
Revised September 11, 2017