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Keyword: board of education

Newly Inaugurated Council, Judges and Other Officials Begin their Terms

John Olszewski, Jr. was sworn in today as Baltimore County’s fourteenth County Executive, vowing to create a more modern, transparent and open government while enhancing Baltimore County’s quality of life, strengthening the delivery of public services, and leading with innovation. More than one thousand invited guests, elected officials, County employees and members of the public celebrated the inauguration of local government officials in the executive, legislative and judicial branches.

Inaugural Ceremonies

The inaugural ceremonies took place at Towson University’s SECU Arena at 10 a.m. today with Administrative Judge Kathleen Gallogly Cox administering the oath of office to Clerk of the Court Julie Ensor, who then administered oaths of office to the other elected officials including Judges of the Circuit Court Carey Deeley, Michael Finifter, Ruth Jakubowski and Dennis Robinson; Judges of the Orphans Court William Evans, Juliet Fisher and Arthur Frank; Sheriff R. Jay Fisher; Register of Wills Grace Connolly; members of the Board of Education Kathleen S. Causey, Roger B. Hayden, Julie C. Henn, Moalie S. Jose, Russell T. Kuehn, Lisa A. Mack, Rod McMillion, John H. Offerman Jr., Cheryl E. Pasteur, Lily P. Rowe and Makeda Scott; and the members of the County Council.

In the legislative branch, one new member of the Baltimore County Council, Izzy Patoka, took the oath of office along with six incumbents. The County Council members are 1st District Councilman Tom Quirk, 2nd District Councilman Izzy Patoka, 3rd District Councilman Wade Kach, 4th District Councilman Julian Jones, Jr., 5th District Councilman David Marks, 6th District Councilwoman Cathy Bevins, and 7th District Councilman Todd Crandell.

“I’m excited and looking forward to a very bright future for the County, and can’t wait to get started working with the Olszewski administration to maintain Baltimore County’s reputation of fiscal responsibility and excellent service to our constituents,” said County Council Chair Jones.

“I am humbled and honored to begin this journey, and I am ready to hit the ground running, work with my colleagues, and put communities first as we build a better Baltimore County together,” said County Executive Olszewski. 

The full text of County Executive Olszewski’s inaugural remarks, as prepared, are available on the County website.


Planning Money for Two High Schools Will be Included in Next Budget

Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz announced today that he will include county planning funds for two new high schools in his FY 19 budget request.  Based upon enrollment projections, the schools would serve the Towson area and the central-northeast area.

“After numerous meetings with education experts and community leaders, it is clear that Baltimore County needs to alleviate overcrowding in the Towson area, as well as the central-northeast corridor," said Kamenetz.  "We need to resolve overcrowding at Towson High, although there are complications due to the school's designation as a County historic structure. The location of a second new school to alleviate overcrowding in the central-northeast corridor will be influenced by the pending high school enrollment reassessment currently being conducted by the school system. Nevertheless, it is clear that we need to fund two new schools to resolve overcrowding."

Although the County School Board recently added a last-minute amendment on Tuesday to its capital budget, calling for two new high schools at specific locations, there is insufficient time for the school system to provide necessary data to state officials to be considered by the state during its fall review. However, the commitment by County Executive Kamenetz for county planning money will ensure that planning for two new high schools can continue at the county level.

By 2026, the school system projects that Towson High will be 456 students over state-rated capacity. The same study indicates that two schools in the central-northeast corridor also face overcrowding, with Dulaney High School at 188 students over state-rated capacity by 2026, and Perry Hall High at 234 students overcapacity. Kamenetz's high school plans would eliminate the projected overcrowding.

Schools for Our Future

When County Executive Kamenetz was elected in 2010, Baltimore County faced overcrowded schools and outdated school buildings.

In response, Kamenetz crafted a $1.3 billion dollar Schools for Our Future program, the largest single investment in school construction in the history of the County, building 16 new schools, and 15 renovations and additions.

During this initiative, Baltimore County has contributed $2 to every state dollar for school construction. “Baltimore County is not alone in its need for new schools,” said Kamenetz. “Governor Hogan must increase the state’s contribution for school construction if school districts all over the state are to remain competitive.”


 
 
Revised September 11, 2017