Skip Navigation

Image of the Baltimore County Historic Courthouse

Baltimore County News

Stay informed of what's happening in Baltimore County.
Date: Jan 10, 2019

By Director of Public Works Steve Walsh

We all know to watch out for ice on the roads when frozen precipitation falls from the sky. But, every winter, Public Works receives calls about water freezing on County roads even when the skies are clear and roads are otherwise bone dry. This can happen because of broken or leaking water mains, hydrants, or meters, or seeping ground water — which is especially prevalent this year due to the record-breaking wet weather.

To report any water issue – whatever the season, whatever the reason – constituents should call the Bureau of Utilities at 410 887-7415. This number is manned 24/7.

The Bureau of Utilities investigates, logs and monitors water problems. If a water main or meter is leaking or has failed, the Bureau of Utilities contacts Baltimore City’s water maintenance division which assigns crews to eventually fix the problem. The City schedules repairs based on a priority list and, because the water system is operated by Baltimore City, emergency repairs are in the City’s hands. The County does keep in touch with City utility engineers to ensure that County streets get the attention they deserve.

If the water is determined to be groundwater, solutions are investigated. Groundwater issues are more difficult to resolve however. 

In either case, Utilities coordinates with the Bureau of Highways, as needed, to spread salt on County public roads to ensure public safety.

This type of unexpected road hazard is yet another reason to be sure that you are always paying attention to the road – not your phone!


Cross-functional experts to recommend improvements, enhance transparency

County Executive Johnny Olszewski today announced the full membership of his new blue ribbon commission tasked with studying the County budget process.

The Baltimore County Commission on Fiscal Sustainability, which Olszewski created on his first day in office, is tasked with developing recommendations to improve fiscal sustainability and identify opportunities for enhanced transparency and increased public engagement in the budgeting process.

“This group of fiscal and policy experts are some of the best and brightest from across our state and are uniquely qualified to help us streamline and reform the County’s budgeting process,” said Olszewski. 

The seven-member Commission on Fiscal Sustainability consists of four voting members appointed by the County Executive:

  • Carolyn Colvin, Former Acting Commissioner of the  United States Social Security Administration
  • Lester Davis, Deputy Chief of Staff and Director of the Office of Policy & Communications, Office of Baltimore City Council President Bernard C. “Jack” Young
  • Warren Deschenaux, Former Executive Director, Maryland Department of Legislative Services 
  • Don Mohler, Former Baltimore County Executive

As well as three voting members selected by the County Council:

  • Edwin Crawford, Former Managing Partner, Lyons Investment Group
  • Elizabeth Irwin, Deputy County Auditor, Baltimore County
  • Edward Walters, Vice President, Head of Managed Accounts, T. Rowe Price

“Our annual budget is the blueprint that sets our priorities and charts the course for County government, and we can only benefit from inviting outside experts and the public to offer fresh perspectives and help us identify opportunities for improvement,” said County Council Chairman Tom Quirk.

The volunteer members will serve one-year terms at the pleasure of the County Executive. The commission will issue interim recommendations to the County Executive by February 15, 2019, in time to be considered as part of the FY 20 budget cycle. Final recommendations are due by May 15, 2019.

The Commission’s first meeting will be held Tuesday, January 15, at 10:00 a.m. in Room 118 of the Historic Courthouse, 400 Washington Avenue, Towson, MD 21204. 


 
 
Revised September 11, 2017