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Baltimore County News

Stay informed of what's happening in Baltimore County.

By Ingrid Beardsley, RD, LDN, Nutrition Program Manager, Baltimore County Department of Aging

How can a meal program do more than just serve a meal? The Baltimore County Eating Together Program is on the frontlines to improve older adults’ overall well-being and reduce isolation and malnutrition.

After leaving our meal program, appetites are not the only thing satisfied. Participants walk away with full hearts from socializing, full minds from health/nutrition education, and full bodies from nutrient-packed meals.

Increased socialization is one of the additional benefits of meal programs like Eating Together, according to a 2017 survey conducted by the National Association of Nutrition and Aging Services Programs. Eighty-three percent of individuals reported they have more friends now than before they started visiting the meal program. Participants like attending so they can speak with their friends, meet new friends, and leave their homes for a little while each day.

Each meal provides one third of the daily nutrition requirements and is approved by a Registered Dietitian.

The survey found that 70% of participants said their knowledge of good nutrition has increased and more than half said their health improved since they started attending the program.

More Reasons to Join

  • Eat more fruits and vegetables.
  • Learn about healthy eating.
  • Obtain a break from cooking and doing dishes.
  • Save on grocery bills.
  • Delight in the meals.
  • Discover what is happening in the senior center/community.
  • It’s easier than cooking for one person.

How to Join Eating Together

Residents ages 60 and over and their spouses of any age are eligible to participate, and are asked to make a voluntary, confidential donation. The suggested donation is $2.50 per meal.

Seniors looking for healthy food, nutrition education and social interaction can learn more about Baltimore County’s Eating Together Program at or call 410-887-3052.

Eating Together -- a one-stop way to meet nutritional needs and make some new friends along the way.

County Executive Establishes Dedicated Investigative Unit

Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz announced today that the County is creating a dedicated animal abuse unit in the Baltimore County Police Department to take the lead in investigation and enforcement efforts.

“In response to community input, I asked Police Chief Sheridan and Animal Services Director Dr. Melissa Jones to review County procedures regarding the referral and priority handling of animal cruelty cases,” stated County Executive Kamenetz. “That review recommended that Baltimore County establish a specialized unit in the Baltimore County Police Department dedicated to animal abuse cases, and this unit  will be up and running by the end of the month.”

The new Animal Abuse Investigative Team will comprise a police sergeant, a police officer and three civilian investigators. Animal Services has seen an increase in the number of suspected animal abuse cases since a new state law went into effect last October, compelling veterinary practitioners to report suspicions of animal cruelty or fighting to local animal control or law enforcement agencies.

The County’s review indicated that at the present time individuals may call a variety of numbers to report animal abuse cases.  Calls are made to the local police precinct, 911, Animal Services or even the State’s Attorney’s office. Under the new procedure, all callers will be directed to call 410-887-5901 to reach the Animal Abuse Investigative Team. If the Animal Abuse Investigative Team is unable to respond for whatever reason, callers will be instructed to call 911 immediately, and 911 operators will then refer the caller to the local police precinct.  The precinct will investigate and refer the case to the Animal Abuse Investigative Team for follow-up.

“Establishing a dedicated police unit to handle suspected cases of animal abuse will be a more effective way to handle what are often very challenging cases,” said Police Chief Terrence B. Sheridan.

“The creation of this unit creates a much clearer line of communication for the public and for our employees at Animal Services,” said Melissa Jones, V.M.D., Director of Baltimore County Animal Services. “I’m very pleased to have the resources of the Police Department to investigate and fight animal cruelty in our communities.”

“I encouraged the County Executive to review all of the procedures in animal cruelty cases, and I am very pleased that he followed up,” said 1st District Councilman Tom Quirk. “This should be a much improved process.”

“The creation of a specialized unit in the Police Department to handle animal abuse will significantly improve communications between my office and the county,” said State’s Attorney Scott Shellenberger.

Also Presents Citation Thanking Dick’s Sporting Goods for Changing Gun and Ammunition Sales Policies

One month after 17 people perished at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz stood with hundreds of students at Towson’s George Washington Carver Center for Arts and Technology this morning. Students walked out of class to honor victims of that tragic mass shooting and to call for gun safety measures as part of the #NationalStudentWalkout.

Carver students walk out of class in memory of victimsChants of “kids – not victims,” “never again,” and “we want change” reverberated across the school campus as students rallied around the flagpole, joining their peers around the nation in calling for legislators to take action to protect students from gun violence.

“I am very proud to support these bright and engaged students as they exercise their first amendment right to raise their voices to call for common sense gun reform and school safety," said Kamenetz.

“Today, we’re walking out to express our voice and our opinions on the gun laws in the country of the United States,” said Carver Senior Class President Reginald “Reggie” Morton. “This is not just for Maryland and Baltimore County to hear our voice, but it is also for the country as a whole to hear our voice today to express that we need different laws.”

“Gun safety is one of the most important issues of our times and I am proud of students for standing up and saying, no more,” said Baltimore County Council Chair Julian E. Jones, Jr.

Kamenetz Recognizes Dick’s Sporting Goods for Being Part of the Solution

Later this morning, Kamenetz visited the Dick’s Sporting Goods store in Hunt Valley to thank managers for Dick’s decisive action in recently changing their firearms and ammunition sales policies. He presented an Executive Citation to the Hunt Valley store manager and regional representatives in grateful recognition of their recent policy change ending the sale of assault-style rifles and high-capacity magazines in all stores, and eliminating sales to anyone under 21 years of age of all firearms and ammunition.

“As one of the largest retailers of guns, Dick’s Sporting Goods’ actions will have a significant real-world effect in addressing the gun violence epidemic in our country and helping to protect the safety of our children and residents,” Kamenetz said. “It also sets an excellent example for other retailers and for the legislators whose job it is to protect innocent people form gun violence.”

Revised September 11, 2017