Skip Navigation

Baltimore County iWatch Logo

Public Safety News

 

Baltimore County Police and Fire News

Official News Blog of Baltimore County police, fire, homeland security and emergency management. Call 911 to report crimes in progress and emergencies.
Keyword: youth

The Baltimore County Police Department, this week, is hosting its 11th annual Youth Leadership Academy (YLA).

The YLA offers the 28 teens, 14 to 18, the opportunity to develop leadership skills while having fun and meeting with peers who are like-minded.

Each day the teenagers meet at the Police Training Academy at 8 a.m. and begin a week of new insight into the police department and the people who serve.

The teens learn leadership and teamwork when they spend the day at the Parke School.

At the police academy, they role play crime scenes. Teens are pushed to think, investigate and interview crime victims and suspects. They soon discover this isn’t CSI.

The week is exciting and educational. Young people who are thinking about working in the criminal justice field will find this time well spent.

This week marks the tenth year for the Youth Leadership Academy (YLA) program.

The YLA program fosters and encourages teens, ages 14 to 18, to be future leaders in and out of the community. The 25 teens will develop and foster leadership skills while meeting and having fun with like-minded peers.

Each day the YLA members will meet at the Police Training Academy, located on the campus grounds of the Community College of Baltimore County - Dundalk, at 8 a.m. to gain insight into the police department and the people who serve. During those hours they will be busy learning the many aspects of police work and the mental strength needed to be an officer and leader.

They will visit various locations. The teens will build leadership and teamwork skills when they spend the day at The Park School, located at Falls and Old Court roads. At the Police Academy, they will be pushed to think, investigate and interview crime victims and suspects when they role play crime scenes. 

The week is exciting and educational. Young people who are thinking about working in the criminal justice field will find this time well spent.

Crime prevention, police partnerships, outreach and public safety education to schools, communities and all segments of our society are the responsibility of every single Baltimore County police officer, said Chief Jim Johnson in announcing a departmental reorganization. The reorganization will further enhance and build upon the agency’s long-standing and a very successful community policing program.

In the past, Johnson said the department’s Community Resources Bureau was separate from the Operations Bureau, leading some officers to feel that building community relationships and working with young people was the primary responsibility of the Community Resources Bureau, or the work of outreach teams in individual precincts.

“Especially in today’s environment, this mind set must change in public safety”, Johnson said. “Our effectiveness rests on the confidence of people we serve. It is critical that we enhance programming and build confidence and relationships with our younger citizens, organizations and all communities in our great County. This is every officer’s business. This is every officer’s role and responsibility – from the Chief all the way to the officers and professional staff members of what I believe is the finest police department in America.”

Effective immediately, the Safe Schools Section, which manages the School Resource Officer program and is liaison to Baltimore County Public Schools, will report to the Operations Bureau, Patrol Division. This will provide better clarity of communication, and coordination of investigations, tactics and procedures to further enhance the safety of our students, faculty and staff that work in our exceptional school system.

A new Youth & Community Resources Section will comprise a Counseling Team, Youth Initiatives and a new Community Partnership Team. This Section will become part of the Operations Bureau reporting to the Operations Commander.

Ten officers assigned to the Juvenile Offenders in Need of Supervision (J.O.I.N.S.) will be reassigned from Police Headquarters to the ten precincts county -wide, allowing families and children in the J.O.I.N.S. Program more convenient, closer to home, police visits and interaction, as well as counseling.

Baltimore County’s very successful and valued Auxiliary Police Program, in which volunteers provide traffic control and other basic operational support to sworn officers, will become part of the Operations Bureau, Support Operations Division.

With this reorganization, the agency will operate under two Bureaus, which will no doubt enhance communications, expedite police response and coordination of crime prevention, community policing and outreach, investigation and patrol services, as well as provide the most robust youth, crime prevention, counseling, and education resources available.

 
 
Revised June 27, 2017