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  1. Unidentified homicide victim found in Maryland may have ties to Massachusetts

    It was a gruesome discovery on an access road near a Maryland cemetery: A young female had been beaten, sexually assaulted and strangled. Her body was wrapped in a white sheet, her hands tied behind h
    2014-12-18T15:04:26+00:00http://www.facebook.com/BaltimoreCountyPoliceandFire/posts/904326492910816
  2. Have you seen this man? Baltimore County detectives are seeking the public’s as...

    Have you seen this man?

    Baltimore County detectives are seeking the public’s assistance in identifying the suspect responsible for a December 1 robbery at a Royal Farms store on Edmonson Avenue.

    The full release is available on our news blog:
    http://www.baltimorecountymd.gov/News/PoliceNews/iWatch/PoliceLookingForSuspectinDecember1RobberyofRoyalFarmsStore


    2014-12-18T14:36:36+00:00http://www.facebook.com/BaltimoreCountyPoliceandFire/posts/904316182911847
  3. * Wanted Person * Have you seen Solomon Nicholas Williams? On December 28, 201...

    * Wanted Person *

    Have you seen Solomon Nicholas Williams?

    On December 28, 2013 at 11:46 p.m., police were called to a home in the 1200 block of 63rd Street 21237 for a report of a stabbing. When officers arrived on the scene, they found an adult male and an adult female suffering from cut wounds.

    More information is available on our news blog:
    http://www.baltimorecountymd.gov/News/PoliceNews/iWatch/PoliceinWhiteMarshPrecinctLookingForManWantedForAssault


    2014-12-18T13:52:28+00:00http://www.facebook.com/BaltimoreCountyPoliceandFire/photos/a.597717780238357.1073741828.583947594948709/904297292913736/?type=1
  4. The Pikesville Precinct Officer of the Month for November 2014 is Officer Wright...

    The Pikesville Precinct Officer of the Month for November 2014 is Officer Wright. #BCoPD #Precinct4 http://ow.ly/G4sDs ^JW


    November 2014 Officer of The Month
    www.baltimorecountymd.gov
    The Pikesville Precinct Officer of the Month for November 2014 is Officer Wright.
    2014-12-17T21:10:37+00:00http://www.facebook.com/BaltimoreCountyPoliceandFire/posts/903997502943715

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Police and Fire News

Baltimore County Police and Fire News

Official News Blog of Baltimore County police, fire, homeland security and emergency management. Call 911 to report crimes in progress and emergencies.
Keyword: kevin kamenetz

Over the past four years, Baltimore County has recorded fewer total homicides than during any four-year period since the Carter Administration, as well as a homicide rate that is historically low.

Nineteen homicides occurred in Baltimore County in 2013 – fewer than in 2012 (23 homicides) and 2011 (30 homicides).

Most significantly, the homicide rate – the number of homicides in proportion to the population – is far lower than since the 1970s because the population has grown by 163,000 people since then: 818,287 in 2013 compared to the mid-600,000s in the 1970s and early 1980s.

Under the current administration and Police Chief James Johnson, the homicide rate has been cut by nearly 43 percent from what it was the year Lennon was shot and Mount St. Helens erupted. In 1980, the rate was four homicides per 100,000 residents; in 2013, the rate is 2.3 homicides per 100,000 residents.

“One homicide is one crime too many,” said County Executive Kevin Kamenetz.  “Still, we are pleased that by all standards our county is safer than it has ever been.”

The total number of homicides over the past four years, during the watch of the Kamenetz administration, is lower than at any continuous four-year period since 1976 to 1979.

Case Clearance Rates

Case clearance rates are a measure of how well a police agency solves crime and holds criminals accountable. BCoPD has some of the highest Part I violent crime case clearance rates in the nation – well above the national average for all Part I violent crimes (homicide, rape, robbery, aggravated assault).

BCoPD’s homicide clearance rates are so good that in September 2013 the U.S. Department of Justice featured BCoPD in a 54-page publication on best practices for homicide clearance. Researchers from the Bureau of Justice Assistance visited our Homicide Unit to examine our staffing, management, resources and investigative strategies.

The study focused on 2011, a year in which BCoPD’s 83.3 percent homicide clearance rate exceeded the national average (62 percent) by more than 21 percent.

In 2012, our homicide clearance rate was an incredible 95.7 percent, compared to the national average of 62.5 percent.

“The DOJ study found what we have known all along to be true,” said Police Chief James Johnson. “We do an exceptional job of clearing cases because we use state-of-the art technology and forensics, because our communities trust us and work with us and – most of all – because we hire, train and retain quality investigators who understand that solving crime is an academic exercise.”

Baltimore County State’s Attorney Scott Shellenberger credited BCoPD’s quality investigative work to his success in prosecuting criminals and thus reducing crime.

 “Prosecutors can only win cases that are solved,” he said. “Quality cases mean lengthy sentences.  Lengthy sentences mean criminals are not on the street to commit additional offenses.  It really is a simple equation.  The police build good cases, the prosecutors seek lengthy sentences and the criminals end up in jail.”

About Crime Statistics

BCoPD compiles crime statistics in accordance with the FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting Program.

In 2011, Baltimore County began presenting annual crime statistics in the context of a multi-year average, rather than simply comparing the numbers to those for the previous year. In any given year, a host of factors – weather is one of the most significant – may cause crime to spike up or down. Such short-term comparisons often do not provide a true picture of local crime.

The number of homicides in 2013 was well below the previous five-year average.

Photo of new police cruisers - the Ford Interceptor.The Baltimore County Police Department (BCoPD) has begun converting its fleet of cruisers to a new model – the Ford Interceptor.

County Executive Kevin Kamenetz and Police Chief James Johnson introduced the new vehicle this morning at a press event at Precinct 7/Cockeysville. The first 50 of the new cars – a $1.3 million investment in public safety – have been purchased and are ready for deployment next month.

The Interceptor – a version of the Taurus designed for law enforcement – will replace the existing Ford Crown Victoria, a model that has been discontinued. BCoPD has used the Crown Victoria since the 1990s. It will take about six years to replace the BCoPD inventory of about 450 Crown Victoria sedans.

All-Wheel Drive and Other Features

A BCoPD panel reviewed a variety of models and settled on the Ford Interceptor because of its features, including:

  • All-wheel drive. The first new Interceptors will be assigned to posts in the more rural precincts – Precinct 3/Franklin, Precinct 7/Cockeysville and Precinct 8/Parkville – where officers often deal with more severe winter weather.
  • A driver’s seat designed with a space to accommodate the officer’s gun and other tools.
  • A 20 percent improvement in fuel economy over the Crown Victoria.
  • Side curtain airbags.

Kamenetz Committed to Needs of Responders

Photo of County Executive Kevin Kamenetz during press conference.“We remain committed to giving our first responders the equipment they need,” said County Executive Kevin Kamenetz. “Our investment in the Police Department is paying dividends, making Baltimore County one of the safest communities in the nation.”

“As a police officer, one of the features I like best about the Interceptor is the way it handles. It’s maneuverable and feels almost like a sports car,” said Chief Johnson. “I think our officers are going to find it a functional and enjoyable car to drive.”

The exterior striping on the cruisers will not change.

The old Crown Victorias will be sold at auction as they are removed from the fleet.

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