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Baltimore County Police and Fire News

Official News Blog of Baltimore County police, fire, homeland security and emergency management. Call 911 to report crimes in progress and emergencies.
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The Baltimore County Police Department today begins a program to equip 1,435 officers with body-worn cameras. The first five years of the program will cost $7.1 million.

The first 150 body-worn cameras (BWCs) are scheduled for deployment in July 2016; they will be deployed equally throughout the 10 precincts to officers in a variety of assignments. The remainder is scheduled for deployment in July 2017.

"Body cameras", said County Executive Kevin Kamenetz, “have the potential to improve public safety. We expect both officer and citizen behavior to improve.” Reductions in complaints against officers and more efficient, effective prosecutions are other expected benefits, he said.

Kamenetz noted that this issue is “complex operationally and legally, and it requires a great deal of fiscal commitment and a commitment to officer training.”

“Enhancing Accountability, Trust”

Kamenetz and police Chief Jim Johnson jointly decided to implement the BWC program. After months of study, Chief Johnson concluded that the times call for police agencies to use tools with the potential to enhance accountability and strengthen a relationship of trust and understanding with communities.

“While cameras are not a panacea and while they pose significant challenges for police agencies, I believe that this technology is here to stay. We decided to work now to ensure an effective program,” Johnson said.

The most important elements of a healthy police-community relationship, Johnson said, will always be outreach and understanding, the free flow of information and commitment to a skilled and diverse workforce. But he said he believes cameras have a place. “I support cameras as a way to provide clarity and transparency in some controversial situations. The public’s trust is invaluable to us, and cameras are one tool that can help us maintain it.”

Last December, Kamenetz called for a comprehensive study of body-worn cameras for police. Johnson assigned an internal workgroup including BCoPD sworn and professional personnel, State’s Attorney Scott Shellenberger, the Office of Information Technology, Sheriff Jay Fisher, and the Fraternal Order of Police Lodge #4.

After months of study -- including input from the NAACP, ACLU, National Alliance on Mental Illness, a representative from the Latino community and other stakeholder groups --  the panel issued a 128-page report to Chief Johnson. The workgroup’s report – which Chief Johnson called “the best body of work I have read on this complicated topic” – recommended additional study rather than implementation of a body camera program at this time.

(The recommendations of the Body-worn Camera Workgroup are available online (PDF) in their entirety.)

Program Costs

The cost of establishing the program is $7.1 million.

That includes $1.25 million for the cameras and related equipment and $5.9 million for maintenance and storage. It also includes the cost of hiring at least 21 additional full-time personnel in several departments to manage the program.

The annual cost of running the BWC program is estimated at $1.6 million.

Program Details

BCoPD standard operating procedures for use of the cameras will not be finalized until after the General Assembly session and any subsequent action by the legislature pursuant to the recommendations of  a state commission on body cameras. These state standards likely will apply to all Maryland police agencies that decide to use body cameras.

BCoPD employs about 1,900 officers and is the 21st largest local police department in the U.S.

Officer training will be essential. One of the concerns about body cameras, Kamenetz and Johnson agree, is their potential to produce robotic officers, wary and unwilling to exercise professional judgment or to interact freely.

Based on the study and the experiences of other agencies that have begun using body-worn cameras, storage and maintenance of massive amounts of video and handling public information requests are challenges requiring additional human resources. Baltimore County’s three-phase implementation program calls for the hiring of additional IT support, evidence specialists, criminal records processors, forensic specialists, attorneys, training personnel and public information specialists.

Noting that body-worn camera programs remain a work in progress, Johnson said BCoPD will continue to monitor programs in other agencies and to participate in the national conversation on body cameras. BCoPD will adapt its program as best practices and problems evolve.

Public Information Laws

Body camera video will be treated the same as any other public record, subject to release under the Maryland Public Information Act and other relevant laws.

The implementation plan will include public outreach to ensure that citizens are aware that these videos are public records, and that citizens as well as police will be portrayed.

The threat of carbon monoxide buildup in homes and businesses escalates during periods of severe cold.

Produced by the incomplete burning of solid, liquid or gaseous fuels such as oil, kerosene, natural gas and wood, carbon monoxide (CO) is a deadly gas that robs the body of oxygen. It is especially dangerous because it is invisible and odorless. CO can make you sick – or even kill you -- without your knowing it is there.

During the winter months, first responders often see CO buildup related to improperly maintained fireplaces, furnaces and wood stoves; ranges and stoves used as supplemental heating devices; and especially to the improper use of portable generators.

"This information is extremely important and can be a matter of life and death," said Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz.  "I hope that everyone will read this carefully and share it with family and friends."

Use of CO Alarms

The easiest and most effective tool to prevent CO poisoning is use of CO alarms, which sound an alert based on exposure to the gas over time. (CO, measured in parts per million, is a cumulative gas; at high levels, it can kill quickly, and at low levels it can gradually sicken.) The device will go off before the average adult would experience symptoms of CO exposure, allowing people to get out of the house and take steps to correct the source of the problem.

In two separate incidents one day last month, 10 county residents were taken to local hospitals after carbon monoxide leaks related to faulty home furnaces. Significantly, neither household had a single carbon monoxide detector.

“CO alarms save lives,” said Fire Chief John Hohman. “Every home that includes a fuel-burning appliance has the potential to generate carbon monoxide, and every home should have alarms to detect carbon monoxide.”

Emergencies involving CO have resulted in important state and local regulations regarding CO and CO detectors, including a Baltimore County law requiring carbon monoxide alarms in all rental housing. There has been one fatal incident in Baltimore County since this law was enacted several years ago, and none since 2010. 

Mike Mohler, Chief Administrator of Permits, Inspections and Approvals, said the current cold snap is a good time to remind all tenants and landlords in Baltimore County that, under county law, all units with a fuel-burning appliance or heating system, including a fire place, must have installed a fully functioning CO detector."

If your alarm sounds, dial 911 and get out of the house. First responders will try to identify the source of the problem and will mitigate the emergency by ventilating the home and, if possible, shutting off the source of the CO. If the problem involves a plumbing or appliance repair, the homeowner or landlord must contact a licensed contractor.

Additional information about carbon monoxide is available on our fact sheet.

About Portable Generators

Portable generators have become popular tools for dealing with power outages. Data from the National Fire Protection Association shows that, nationwide, CO illnesses and deaths related to the use of generators have risen along with generator sales.

 Generators emit far higher levels of CO than an automobile. Opening doors and window or using fans will not prevent CO build-up in the home.

Never operate a generator indoors - including in a basement or garage or in areas with ventilation. Operate generators at least 15 feet from windows, doors and vents that could allow CO to enter your home.

For additional information, see our fact sheet on portable generator use.

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