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Baltimore County Police and Fire News

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The Baltimore County Police Department today begins a program to equip 1,435 officers with body-worn cameras. The first five years of the program will cost $7.1 million.

The first 150 body-worn cameras (BWCs) are scheduled for deployment in July 2016; they will be deployed equally throughout the 10 precincts to officers in a variety of assignments. The remainder is scheduled for deployment in July 2017.

"Body cameras", said County Executive Kevin Kamenetz, “have the potential to improve public safety. We expect both officer and citizen behavior to improve.” Reductions in complaints against officers and more efficient, effective prosecutions are other expected benefits, he said.

Kamenetz noted that this issue is “complex operationally and legally, and it requires a great deal of fiscal commitment and a commitment to officer training.”

“Enhancing Accountability, Trust”

Kamenetz and police Chief Jim Johnson jointly decided to implement the BWC program. After months of study, Chief Johnson concluded that the times call for police agencies to use tools with the potential to enhance accountability and strengthen a relationship of trust and understanding with communities.

“While cameras are not a panacea and while they pose significant challenges for police agencies, I believe that this technology is here to stay. We decided to work now to ensure an effective program,” Johnson said.

The most important elements of a healthy police-community relationship, Johnson said, will always be outreach and understanding, the free flow of information and commitment to a skilled and diverse workforce. But he said he believes cameras have a place. “I support cameras as a way to provide clarity and transparency in some controversial situations. The public’s trust is invaluable to us, and cameras are one tool that can help us maintain it.”

Last December, Kamenetz called for a comprehensive study of body-worn cameras for police. Johnson assigned an internal workgroup including BCoPD sworn and professional personnel, State’s Attorney Scott Shellenberger, the Office of Information Technology, Sheriff Jay Fisher, and the Fraternal Order of Police Lodge #4.

After months of study -- including input from the NAACP, ACLU, National Alliance on Mental Illness, a representative from the Latino community and other stakeholder groups --  the panel issued a 128-page report to Chief Johnson. The workgroup’s report – which Chief Johnson called “the best body of work I have read on this complicated topic” – recommended additional study rather than implementation of a body camera program at this time.

(The recommendations of the Body-worn Camera Workgroup are available online (PDF) in their entirety.)

Program Costs

The cost of establishing the program is $7.1 million.

That includes $1.25 million for the cameras and related equipment and $5.9 million for maintenance and storage. It also includes the cost of hiring at least 21 additional full-time personnel in several departments to manage the program.

The annual cost of running the BWC program is estimated at $1.6 million.

Program Details

BCoPD standard operating procedures for use of the cameras will not be finalized until after the General Assembly session and any subsequent action by the legislature pursuant to the recommendations of  a state commission on body cameras. These state standards likely will apply to all Maryland police agencies that decide to use body cameras.

BCoPD employs about 1,900 officers and is the 21st largest local police department in the U.S.

Officer training will be essential. One of the concerns about body cameras, Kamenetz and Johnson agree, is their potential to produce robotic officers, wary and unwilling to exercise professional judgment or to interact freely.

Based on the study and the experiences of other agencies that have begun using body-worn cameras, storage and maintenance of massive amounts of video and handling public information requests are challenges requiring additional human resources. Baltimore County’s three-phase implementation program calls for the hiring of additional IT support, evidence specialists, criminal records processors, forensic specialists, attorneys, training personnel and public information specialists.

Noting that body-worn camera programs remain a work in progress, Johnson said BCoPD will continue to monitor programs in other agencies and to participate in the national conversation on body cameras. BCoPD will adapt its program as best practices and problems evolve.

Public Information Laws

Body camera video will be treated the same as any other public record, subject to release under the Maryland Public Information Act and other relevant laws.

The implementation plan will include public outreach to ensure that citizens are aware that these videos are public records, and that citizens as well as police will be portrayed.

UPDATE (August 27  5:17 p.m.):

Muhammad Hasnet Shakeelabassi has been returned to Maryland and is being held without bail at the Baltimore County Detention Center.

UPDATE (August 19  11:41 a.m.):

Baltimore County Police have identified the suspect who is responsible for the homicide in Catonsville yesterday as 18-year-old Muhammad Hasnet Shakeelabassi. He is the victim’s son and lived in the home.

Just before noon yesterday, police responded to a home in the 1000 block of Southridge Road 21228 for a call coded as a cardiac arrest. When they arrived at the scene, they found the victim, 50-year-old Shakeel Ahmed Abbasi suffering from traumatic injuries. He was declared deceased at the scene.

Detectives were able to find evidence of stab wounds and bludgeoning. An autopsy will be conducted today to determine an official cause and manner of death.

The initial investigation into the incident has indicated that the victim’s wife received a call from a relative in New Jersey asking her to check on the victim. The relative in New Jersey has received a text message from Muhammad Hasnet Shakeelabbasi asking them to check on the victim. When the victim’s wife went to check on him, she found him not moving and covered with blood so she called 911. The call was dispatched as a cardiac arrest because of how dispatch software coded the call.

Shakeelabassi had been home earlier in the day but was now missing along with the victim’s vehicle, a Honda van. Shakeelabassi was located at approximately 5:30 p.m. along with the victim’s van at a rest stop on the Pennsylvania Turnpike in Bowmansville, Pennsylvania.

Detectives obtained an arrest warrant for Muhammad Hasnet Shakeelabassi charging him with first-degree murder.

Shakeelabassi remains in Pennsylvania awaiting extradition back to Maryland.

UPDATE (August 18  9:47 p.m.):

Baltimore County Police have identified the homicide victim from the 1000 block of Southridge Road as 50-year-old Shakeel Ahmed Abbasi.

Police have taken one suspect, who was known to the victim, into custody in connection with this incident. Formal charges have not yet been filed.

Further information will be released as it becomes available.

Original release (August 18  1:37 p.m.):

Baltimore County Police are investigating a homicide in the 1000 block of Southridge Road, 21228.

Officers were dispatched at 11:48 a.m. for a report of cardiac arrest. When they arrived at the residence, they found an adult male with traumatic injuries. The victim was declared deceased at the scene.

The Homicide unit is on scene investigating. Detectives believe that this is a targeted crime.

Anyone with information on this incident is asked to call police at 410-307-2020.

The Baltimore County Police Department celebrates National Volunteer Appreciation Week with a dinner for volunteers on April 16. The event will take place at the Baltimore Yacht Club, 800 Baltimore Yacht Club Road, Essex, 21221. The evening will begin with dinner and awards at 6 p.m.

Volunteers answer phones, handle clerical work and assist with statistical data, among other duties. Their participation allows officers to focus on patrol and investigation.

Expected to attend the dinner are more than 80 volunteers and members of the Police Auxiliary Team, as well as Chief James Johnson.

National Volunteer Appreciation Week is April 12-18.

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