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Keyword: zika virus

Show airs on Cable Channel 25 and online

The latest edition of Baltimore County’s half-hour cable television public affairs show, “Hello Baltimore County,” highlights recreation programs, streamlined process for MBE-WBE procurement and Zika and tick borne illness prevention.

ICYMI—In case you missed it, we review some recent headlines from your County government.

Great Recreation Programs for Everyone—Learn about fall recreation programs and get a glimpse of the offerings at the Benjamin Banneker Historical Park and Museum.

County Streamlines Procurement Process to Aid MBE/WBE Firms—Learn about big changes to the County’s procurement process that make it easier for smaller firms to compete.

Don’t Get Bitten!—Zika and tick-borne illnesses are a serious matter. Find out how to protect your family.

You can also view the show on Hello Baltimore County's page. Click on the menu icon in the upper left of the video screen to select an individual segment.

In addition to online access, the program runs several times per week on Cable Channel 25, in Baltimore County, at the following times:

  • Mondays: 1:30 p.m., 6 p.m., 10 p.m.
  • Tuesdays: 12 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 9 p.m.
  • Wednesdays: 11 a.m., 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 10 p.m.
  • Thursdays: 1 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 8 p.m.
  • Fridays: 11 a.m., 6 p.m. 

Lucia Donatelli, MD,
 Chief, Bureau of Prevention, Protection, and Preparedness
 Baltimore County Department of Heal
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With the Olympic Games upon us this summer, people all over the world prepare to celebrate athletic excellence. This year, Rio de Janeiro will carry the torch, but unfortunately the spread of Zika virus in many parts of Central America, South America and the Caribbean may dim the light.

Zap Zika graphicAedes mosquitos can be infected with the Zika virus if they bite a person with it. These infected mosquitos can then spread the virus to other people through bites. Many people who become infected with Zika never know it, while others may experience fever, rash, joint pain, and/or conjunctivitis (red eyes). These symptoms usually last for several days to a week. Even though they are mild and will go away with rest and fluids, pregnant women are at risk of passing it on to their unborn babies.  Zika has been linked to a number of birth defects, including microcephaly (small head due to small brain).

When travelling this season, it’s important to be aware of the areas with active transmission of Zika virus. Even in the continental US, where there is currently no active local Zika transmission by mosquitoes, mosquito control and protection are still extremely important to preventing mosquito bites and breeding opportunities. Mosquitoes can easily reproduce in small amounts of water, especially in containers found in your yard.

In order to prevent the spread of Zika virus, always remember to WRAP UP!

W: Wear long sleeved shirts, pants and hats.

R: Repair damaged doors and windows.

A: Always empty containers that hold water to avoid creating mosquito breeding sites.

P: Protect yourself with an EPA-registered insect repellent.

U: Use condoms or abstain from sexual activity if you are pregnant, or if your partner has been in a Zika infested area.

P: Pregnant women should avoid traveling to areas affected by Zika.

By following these simple steps, we can all do our part to Zap Zika!

To learn more about Zika, attend an upcoming Community Chat at 6 p.m. on June 28 at the Baltimore County Department of Health or get the most up-to-date news on the Center for Disease Control and Prevention website.


 
 
Revised September 26, 2016