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Baltimore County News

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Outdoor Clinics Offer Vaccinations for $8

Keep your pet and your family safe this fall by taking advantage of Baltimore County Department of Health’s low-cost rabies vaccination clinics. The outdoor clinics are scheduled from May 7 through June 12 at nine sites. Vaccinations protect domestic animals and humans from rabies, which is a potentially fatal disease.

Vaccinations are $8 and available to cats, dogs and ferrets owned by County residents. The clinics will be held rain or shine. Animals receiving rabies shots must be at least 12 weeks old. All animals must be on leashes or in carriers. Due to time constraints, safety and escape risk, uncontrollable animals will not be vaccinated during the clinics. Aggressive dogs must be muzzled. All cats must be contained in a properly sized, escape-proof carrier. Exact change is appreciated, as cash and checks will be the only forms of payment accepted.

Baltimore County law requires pets to be licensed and for rabies vaccinations to be kept up-to-date. Other precautions against rabies include obeying leash laws and avoiding contact with wild animals or unknown domestic animals. If your pet has had contact with a wild animal, notify your veterinarian. Additionally, if you have been bitten or scratched by an animal, seek medical attention.

Bite and scratch exposures from any animal to a human or pet exposure to wildlife are also reportable to the local Health Department, Police Department or Animal Control authority. For additional information on how to protect your pet against rabies, contact Baltimore County Animal Services at 410-887-PAWS (7297).


 The Evergreene Companies, LLC has started construction of Towson Mews, a luxury townhome community at the gateway to downtown Towson near Historic East Towson. 

Towson Mews will include 34 luxury townhomes, centralized community green space and upscale streetscape and landscaping. The project will be built on two acres bounded by East Pennsylvania, Jefferson and Virginia Avenues.

“Downtown Towson is fast becoming the place to find upscale townhomes and luxury apartments within walking distance of world-class shopping, restaurants and entertainment,” said Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz. “These new homes are perfect for young professionals and anyone who wants all the amenities of Towson living without having to mow a lawn.”

More than 3,000 apartments and townhomes have recently been built or are under construction in downtown Towson.

“Towson Mews is our first neighborhood in the Baltimore area. We are thrilled about the opportunity to create Towson’s next great place to live on such a rare and desirable piece of land,” said Josh Mastrangelo of The Evergreene Companies. 

The Evergreene Companies, LLC is a developer and homebuilder based in Chantilly, Virginia, with operations in Virginia, Maryland and Delaware.

"Towson Mews will be a distinctive residential community that will bring more homeowners into one of Baltimore County's most exciting communities.  I am particularly happy how the design bridges the area from the commercial core to historic East Towson," said Councilman David Marks.

"Our three story townhomes offer a unique style for downtown Towson and an appropriate architectural transition between the single-family houses in historic East Towson and the high-rise residential towers,” said Evergreene’s Mastrangelo.

Towson Mews adds to the more than $1 billion in recent private investment in downtown Towson, including more than 3,000 apartments and townhomes that have been recently built or are under construction. New residential projects include The Palisades, Promenade, Towson Green, The Flats at 703, Towson Mews, The Winthrop and Southerly Square, plus residential towers in the mixed-use Towson Row development.

More than 55,000 people live in greater Towson, with over 48,000 people working at companies including GBMC, General Dynamics, Goucher College, MileOne, Sheppard Pratt, Stanley Black & Decker, Towson University, University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center and Whiting Turner.


- Celebrating Shared History of Only Remaining Covered Bridge in Either County

Following a year of careful restoration work, Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz and Harford County Executive Barry Glassman officially reopened to traffic the historic Jericho Road Covered Bridge in Kingsville.  

“This bridge is very picturesque, but even if it wasn’t, there is real value in honoring the past and exposing our young people to the experiences that built our great nation,” said Kamenetz.

About the Jericho Road Covered Bridge

photo of ribbon-cuttingThe Civil War era bridge, which borders Baltimore and Harford counties and is jointly owned by both, had been deteriorating, with parts of the wood arch and truss system weakened by parasites and the bridge deck needing replacement. The structure was closed a year ago and craftsmen from Barns and Bridges of News England, Inc. worked in coordination with Kingsley Construction to make historically sensitive repairs. The $1.7 million restoration project was funded primarily with a grant from the National Historic Bridge Preservation Program, with Baltimore and Harford Counties each funding 10% of the total cost.

The bridge, which spans the Little Gunpowder Falls, was built in 1865 and is significant as the only remaining covered bridge in the two counties. Though repaired many times, 60% of the wooden structure is original. The bridge was among the first properties designated as a historic landmarks by the Baltimore County Council in 1976 and was placed on the National Register of Historic Places that same year.

The structure is a timber Burr Arch Truss design, meaning that both the arch and the truss system work together to bear the load. It was originally built of eastern white pine. The current restoration, however, relies primarily on Douglas fir and locust – woods which are lighter and more resistant to decay. The covered bridge is 86 feet long and 14 feet wide. It is roofed with cedar shakes, has a timber plank deck and carries about 700 vehicles each day.

The bridge underwent two major rehabilitations in 1932 and 1982, but some of the alterations were not historically sensitive. This most recent restoration was carefully planned and performed so that the historic features and character of the bridge were retained and preserved. 

"The restoration of this iconic bridge was made possible thanks to partnerships on so many levels,” said Baltimore County 5th District Councilman David Marks. “The many years of work paid off, and the bridge looks fantastic."

Bridge is One of Many Attractions of Historic Jerusalem Mill Village

To mark the grand opening, Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz and Harford County Executive Barry Glassman shared a horse-drawn buggy ride across the bridge after a short ribbon-cutting ceremony. In addition, the Friends of Jerusalem Mill, Inc., a volunteer organization dedicated to preserving local heritage, hosted tours, demonstrations and refreshments in the historic Jerusalem Mill Village, which features a Visitor’s Center, a restored mill building, 1930s General Store and a blacksmith’s shop.

 


 
 

Revised April 6, 2016