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Baltimore County Now

Stay informed of what's happening in Baltimore County.
Keyword: www.baltimorecountymd.gov

photo of Adopt-A-Road signKristi Pilarski, Adopt-A-Road Coordinator, Bureau of Highways

Cigarette butts, soda cans and other trash you may see along the road is not just unsightly, but it can get washed down into storm drains during a heavy rain, wash into our waterways and pollute recreational water areas, drinking water supplies, and eventually, the Chesapeake Bay. This is why Adopt-A-Road is one of our solutions for the environment and your community.

You can see our green and white Adopt-A-Road signs all around Baltimore County, showing community support for a Clean, Green Baltimore County. It is easy to join the Adopt-A-Road program. A group makes a commitment to pick up roadside litter just four times per year for at least two years.

We receive support from the community from all types of adopters. Adopters include civic and non-profit organizations, school groups, commercial and private enterprises, families and individuals. We have adopters of all ages, the youngest being 12 years old. I am always looking for new adopters, individuals or groups, to help grow the Adopt-A-Road program.

This program is a great service project for all sorts of groups, and especially helpful for high school students who need community service hours to graduate. It’s a nice way for families to come together to show support for their neighborhood. One of our newest groups, a motorcycle club, even made participation in Adopt-A-Road a prerequisite to joining their club.

Our Adopt-A-Road program started twenty years ago and had much success in the past. I am hoping to continue to make it successful and grow the program, so we can help keep Baltimore County’s roads clean.

I try to keep everything simple for the adopter. Once the application is approved, I give the safety training to the coordinator or to the entire group. At that time, I supply the group with all the supplies needed for the cleanups. We supply the trash bags, pickers, gloves, signs and the safety vests. Each group receives an Adopt-A-Road sign at their adopted road location and we will collect the trash bags after each clean up.

If you would be interested in the Adopt-A-Road program, I would love to hear from you! Contact me directly at kepilarski@baltimorecountymd.gov or 410-887-3560.


photo of a Victorian home in Sudbrook ParkFronda Cohen, Baltimore County Office of Communications

When we moved to Sudbrook Park in 1988, we had never heard the word “curvilinear.” After many walks through this historic community in Pikesville, we soon learned about the pleasures of curving, winding roads and the history of a neighborhood that in 1889 became an experiment in suburban community design.

Frederick Law Olmsted, Sr., the father of landscape architecture in America, is perhaps best known as co-designer of New York City’s Central Park. His “experiment” in Baltimore County was based on the idea that a suburban village would be an attractive alternative to the densely populated city. 

Olmsted designed Sudbrook with a distinct entranceway, a narrow bridge that led to open green spaces for community gatherings, spacious lots for Victorian cottages, and smaller lots for more affordable homes. The setting was green, with mature trees lining winding roads that encouraged walking, enjoying nature, and meeting neighbors along the way.

Olmsted’s gateway bridge at the entrance to Sudbrook Park still spans the rail line, although 125 years later it is the Metro that shares the tracks with the railroad that once took residents downtown to work. On any given day, you’ll find walkers, runners, and bicyclists exploring the curvilinear roads.  Victorian homes still grace streets lined with centuries-old oaks. Neat brick colonials built during World War II anchor the smaller lots. Neighbors, kids and dogs in tow, enjoy the annual July 4 and Halloween parades that end with celebrations at the Sudbrook community park.

Sudbrook Park remains a community where design, nature and good neighbors still enjoy what Frederick Law Olmsted called a “respite for the spirit.”   

Happy 125th birthday, Sudbrook.


photo of soldier with gunsmokeJordan Fish
Baltimore County Tourism & Promotion

Celebrate the 200th anniversary of the defense of Baltimore and the writing of our national anthem. Whether you’re a huge history buff, or you’re not entirely sure what year the War of 1812 started, there are great events occurring over the next two weeks in Baltimore County. Make sure you get out to some or all of these unique happenings, and celebrate your patriotism and Maryland pride!

Defenders Day – Battle of North Point

Baltimore County’s Battle of North Point is a prominent part of American history. Marking the battle, the Defenders Day event on September 6 and 7 takes place at Fort Howard Park in Baltimore County on the shores of the Chesapeake Bay. This commemorative event and reenactment “kicks off” Maryland’s Star-Spangled Spectacular week.

The Dundalk Patapsco Neck Historical Society and Baltimore County Tourism and Promotion are pleased to offer free parking and free admission to the event. On Monday, September 8, a fireworks display will be held on the grounds of Sparrows Point High School.

The 200th March of the Defenders

This year is not only the 200th anniversary of the Star-Spangled Banner and the Battles of North Point and Baltimore; it is also the 200th anniversary of the 1-175th Infantry Regiment of the Maryland National Guard (MDNG).

Commemorating the occasion, 500 uniformed MDNG men and women will march the 6-mile route that the Maryland Militia marched 200 years ago to defend Baltimore and the nation from the British invasion. On Thursday, September 11, Governor Martin O’Malley and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake will send off the troops from Patterson Park and Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz will greet them at Battle Acre. More details about this event can be found on the Star-Spangled 200 website  {Web page may take a minute to load.}

The Star-Spangled Festival at Martin State Airport

Martin State Airport is opening its doors for two full days of festivities from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. The Festival offers local Maryland foods and crafts, Blue Angels souvenirs, music, the Glenn L. Martin Aviation Museum, and static aircraft displays. History booths and demos tell the story of the U.S. Navy, aviation, and the War of 1812. Parking is free with shuttles running from parking areas to the festival all day.

Please Note: The Blue Angels’ air show will NOT be seen at the Martin State Airport Festival – the show will be performed over Fort McHenry in Baltimore City. Visitors to the Festival at Martin State can see the Blue Angels take-off (approximately 1:30 p.m.) and land (approximately 4 p.m.) only. Please also review the bag and security policies before arriving at the Festival. {Web page may take a minute to load.}


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