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Baltimore County Now

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Keyword: workforce development

photo of job interview

Julia Lynton-Brown, Talent Management Coordinator, Baltimore County Department of Economic and Workforce Development

Let’s face it. Looking for a job can be a challenging, frustrating and sometimes lonely effort. Baltimore County’s Workforce Development Centers can help. Clients who visit the County’s Eastpoint, Hunt Valley or Liberty Center in Randallstown will experience a warm and friendly team of career professionals to assist with services such as professional development seminars, career counseling, resume review and job interview assistance. By registering in the Maryland Workforce Exchange (MWE), jobseekers can also have access to employment opportunities, onsite recruitment events and timely labor market information.

Companies with jobs to fill work with Baltimore County’s Business Services team to connect with talented workers through free, customized onsite recruitments. Recent opportunities ranged from corporate call centers to manufacturing, with informational and interviewing sessions for companies such as McCormick, Toyota Financial, BD (Becton Dickinson) and Access Receivables.

“Strategic partnerships among the County’s Business Services team, Workforce Development Centers and our business partners have resulted in full-time opportunities offering competitive wages and benefits for many of our customers” said Leo Martinelli, Hunt Valley Workforce Development Center Manager.

Outreach and pre-screening by center staff is key to ensuring businesses meet well qualified candidates. BD and Toyota Financial have returned twice and hired qualified candidates as a direct result of workforce recruitment sessions. Access Receivables, one of the most recent businesses to partner with Economic and Workforce Development, hired additional workforce candidates.

“All service related businesses revolve around the ability to find, hire and train excellent people. In our experience with the Baltimore County Department of Economic and Workforce Development, we’ve achieved our hiring goals. We believe this success was entirely due to our partnership with the County and a mutual understanding of this business challenge, said Kevin Gillespie, Vice President of Access Receivables in Hunt Valley. “It is our hope to continue this partnership, as their dedicated team of professionals have built an excellent model for local employers, the local workforce and the entire community.”

“This has been one of the most successful methods for us to find and hire the talent needed to fill our Corporate Call Center opportunities,” states Scott Brooke, Talent Acquisition Consultant for Toyota Financial Services in Owings Mills.

“The talent is always professional and well prepared for the interview,” added Cindy Denholm, HR Partner for BD in Sparks.

Whether you are looking for a job or a company looking for qualified candidates, Baltimore County Economic and Workforce Development can provide free, professional help. Details and resources for job seekers and businesses are available online or by calling 410-887-8000.


Sara Trenery, Baltimore County Department of Economic & Workforce Development

On July 10, 1964, Alan and Lois Elkin opened a small business selling copying supplies, ribbons, carbons and duplicators in 1,200 square feet of space. Little did they know at the time that one day this small business would become Maryland’s largest independent document management company, Advance –The Document Specialists, employing over 180 people at four locations.

It took just three years before Advance outgrew its space and moved its eight employees to Timonium.  In an effort to demonstrate their copier products to the customer, Advance created the “Curbside Copier Showroom,” a modified Winnebago equipped with copy machines for mobile demonstrations.

With business booming, Advance moved to its current headquarters in Cockeysville.  In 1990 Jeff Elkin joined his parents in the business and in 2000 was named CEO of the company.

With annual revenues approaching $40 million, Advance continues to receive national recognition and awards for their commitment to providing outstanding service-not just during “normal business hours” but during evenings, weekends and holidays. Advance is also a manufacturer’s certified service training center, one of the few in the entire U.S.

In 2006, 2008 and 2009, Advance’s employees rated the company one of the best places to work, making Advance a finalist for Baltimore Business Journal’s Best Places to Work award.

Alan Elkin describes his philosophy this way: “Advance is not just a job. Advance is our life. We love what we do. It is what defines us. “We Live and Breathe This Stuff” is not just the tagline for our commercials; it is our culture.”

 As Advance celebrates 50 years in business, Baltimore County salutes the Elkin family for their commitment to their customers and their community.


photo of Acadia Windows manufacturing plantRick Johnson,
Baltimore County Department of Economic and Workforce Development

Since the days of aluminum storm windows in 1947, Acadia Windows & Doors has manufactured commercial and residential windows and doors in Rosedale. Skilled workers turn large sheets of glass, saws, and presses into energy efficient vinyl products engineered for maximum durability. Acadia’s products benefit from proprietary engineering, high tech equipment, and lean (and green) manufacturing processes. Today, Acadia is recognized as one of the East Coast’s major manufacturers of new and replacement windows and doors.

Since 2005, Acadia has worked closely with the Arc Northern Chesapeake Region (The Arc NCR) to provide employment opportunities to individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Acadia has hired nine employees from The Arc NCR with great success.  "We didn’t partner with The Arc NCR to be altruistic; we partnered with them because it makes sense as a business decision,” said Acadia’s Vice President of Manufacturing Neill Christopher. “This is a great pool of workers.”

Arc NCR workers have made a difference on the manufacturing floor, performing tasks that resulted in production line improvements for the company.  Arc NCR workers earn the same wages as people without disabilities doing the same job, and interact with their peers at the company in an integrated work environment.

“We had a great deal of trepidation when The Arc NCR first approached us,” continued Christopher. “This is a manufacturing environment, with large sheets of glass, saws and presses, all capable of inflicting serious injury.  What we learned is that everything that we did to make things safer for our team members from The Arc NCR made it safer for everyone else as well.  We’re an OSHA SHARP site; proud of our safety record while striving to always make our facility safer for all who work or visit here."

Acadia's success story with Arc was so impressive, the company was asked to join a panel at a National Governors Association meeting to discuss their experience in the field of disability employment.

When disabilities are not barriers, everyone wins.


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