Baltimore County Now
Print this page.
Baltimore County Now - News You Can Use

Baltimore County Now

Stay informed of what's happening in Baltimore County.
Keyword: workforce development

photo of interns who were interviewedOur Labor Market of the Future

What is bringing these talented young people home to Baltimore County?  These bright and driven students may have spread out to NYC, Philly, DC and New England for college, but they were back working, living, playing in Baltimore County this summer. 

Summer Interns Interviewed

What was it that led them to pass up summer career experience opportunities from Wall Street to the Capital? 

Will Anderson, Director of Baltimore County Economic and Workforce Development, sat down and asked them about their summer internships in Baltimore County and their futures.

Their answers give us reasons to believe our region will be in very good hands as these young people build their own careers and drive our next generation economy.

What’s going on that excites you here?

Bella: “Connectivity. The county wraps around the city so you get the best of both worlds. I love being able to hike along Patapsco River and then be in the city in as little as 5 miles. And, there’s lots that can be done to strengthen that connection through transit, workforce and education. We are in a hub of non-profits, stellar colleges and major government entities where so much can and will be happening in the next 15 years. It’s an exciting frontier for any career in public policy or behavioral economics.”

Nicole: “Although I’m studying Chemical Engineering while in school, when I’m home I love to get back to my roots in the theatre. This region has amazing community theaters like STAR Theater in Catonsville, the Dundalk Community Theater, UMBC theater group, not to mention access to the city’s Hippodrome, Everyman Theater, Center Stage and the new Chesapeake Shakespeare Theater.”

Saché: “When you look around, Baltimore is growing. You see new businesses arising all the time with tons of opportunity in the field of business and information technology. Also, living in Towson has been great. So much is going on. There are more restaurants, a really nice movie theater just opened, and tons of places to shop around the Towson Campus. It’s also not far from home.”

Sam: “Hands down it’s Ultimate Frisbee. I’ve been involved with the Central Maryland Ultimate Association over the years and both Baltimore County and City have amazing parks to play. One of my favorite spots is Benjamin Banneker Park.”

Khala: “I like that it’s the best of both worlds. I like the County because it has great places to go like the mall, the movies, bowling. Then I like having the city to go to the Inner Harbor, the Gallery and some of the unique smaller stores. It’s great having both. Beyond that, when I’m away at college, I miss all of our great food!”

How did your internship change you?

Sam: “The lab for Physical Sciences at bwtech@UMBC put me in a working environment that could be intimidating at times, but well worth it. It really made me rethink my major in GIS. I’m going to put a greater focus on Economics and Math as I continue on to do research in grad school. If the opportunity presented itself, I’d like to work in the Baltimore region. I feel like it’s a good place to be as it continues growing.”

Bella: “Now I’m sure. This summer made me realize I want to come back. I realize now that I’m much more interested in economics rather than straight-laced finance, like what you see on Wall Street. Community development and housing issues are something I can really be passionate about and there’s so much opportunity to make a difference here around Baltimore.”

What do you want to contribute?

Khala: “Ultimately I want to work with prisoners. I think I could make a real difference. Lots of people just want to forget about them, but in many cases it’s a good person just in a bad situation. Everyone has a soft spot you can bring out.”

Sache: “Other than being successful for myself and my family, I want to give back to the community. Growing up in a really rural area, we lacked some of the technology and connectivity that’s so prevalent in contemporary education. I might not move back to my home town, but I can see myself going back and getting involved in bringing more technology to the schools – like iPads and laptops. We need to promote these things early on in our children’s education so they don’t leave and fall into a culture shock.”

Dionna: “I too would like to get involved with the schools. A great example is the Bring Your Code to School Program. This is a program designed to introduce kids to coding throughout the region. My cousin was on a local robotics team and he’s doing amazing things volunteering with that program.”

About the Interns

Nicole Dantoni
College: Widener University, Philadelphia Pennsylvania

Major: Chemical Engineering
Home: Catonsville, Baltimore County
Internship: STAR Theater in Catonsville

Sam Besse
College: University of Maryland, College Park

Major: Economics and Geographic Information
Home: Relay, Baltimore County
Internship: The lab for Physical Sciences at bwtech@UMBC

Saché Bond       
College: Towson University, Baltimore County

Major: Information Systems with a minor in Business
Home: St. Mary’s County
Internship: Baltimore County Office of Budget and Finance

Khala Evans-Addison
College: Johnson & Wales, Providence Rhode Island

Major: Counseling Psychology 
Home: Owings Mills, Baltimore County
Internship: Baltimore County Office of Budget and Finance

Dionna Fair-Latta
College: UMBC, Baltimore County

Major: Business Technology
Home: Baltimore City
Internship: Baltimore County Office of Budget and Finance

Bella Willeboordse
College: New York University, NY

Major: Economics and Public Policy
Home: Catonsville, Baltimore County
Internship: Baltimore County Department of Workforce and Economic Development

Interview by Will Anderson,
Baltimore County Director of Economic and Workforce Development

interior photo of McCormick HQBaltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz and Will Anderson, Director, Baltimore County Department of Economic and Workforce Development

The economic development race was on when McCormick & Company, the global spice and flavorings powerhouse, announced it was looking for a new headquarters campus location. We suspect there was a gleam of hope in the eyes of every governor, county executive and mayor in the mid-Atlantic as they revved up their economic development operations and opened Power Point to prepare their pitches.

Baltimore County rolled up its sleeves. One of the first business meetings of this administration was with the CEO of McCormick, one of our largest employers. Maintaining that sound relationship set the groundwork for open dialogue as the company started its site selection process. Baltimore County worked for more than13 months to identify sites and appropriate incentives to meet the company’s requirements.  

After rounds of due diligence and a lot of public speculation, McCormick chose to stay home, in Baltimore County Maryland.   

Here’s why we believe McCormick decided to stay and invest here.

·        Baltimore County’s business climate is right for a global company. Our property and income tax rates have not gone up for decades. This stability is critical for business planning.

·        For more than 40 years, McCormick’s C-level headquarters and key operations have been spread out in northern Baltimore County. An R&D innovation center and two active manufacturing plants already are in Hunt Valley, so it made good business sense to have these operations and talent closer together in a 21st century business environment.

·        McCormick employs more than 10,000 people around the world.  One fifth of McCormick’s workforce – 2,100 employees – work in Baltimore County. About 900 of these employees will be moving to the new Hunt Valley campus.

·        McCormick is a global publicly traded company with $4.2 billion in annual sales of spices, seasoning mixes, condiments and flavorings.  Baltimore County has ready access to international airports, Wall Street decision makers and services that support manufacturing and trade.     

·        McCormick told us they need a location that helps them recruit and retain top-tier talent. Hunt Valley is a perfect fit. We have some of the region’s most exclusive executive housing and great schools. Hunt Valley Towne Centre and Wegmans are right across the street from the new headquarters site. Plus employees can take light rail right from work to an Os or Ravens game.

So we say ‘thank you McCormick’ and raise a jumbo crab doused with OLD BAY in your honor. We’re glad you chose to stay here in Baltimore County, home of McCormick innovation for generations to come. 

## ##

Job seeker connecting with LabCorp representative at recent Healthcare Hiring Event at the Liberty Center on March 26, 2015Bryan Dunn, Marketing Specialist, Department of Economic & Workforce Development

If you live in the Randallstown area, you often drive down Liberty Road to go to Home Depot or Walmart, take the kids to the Randallstown Community Center or perhaps have dinner at the new Ruby Tuesday or Colin’s restaurant. One thing you may have missed is the life-changing work happening at Baltimore County’s Liberty Center, a formerly vacant grocery store on Offutt and Liberty Roads.

The Liberty Center is where over 11,000 people went to change their lives last year, with resources for anyone looking to hone a personal brand and compete in today’s job market.

Free to the public, Liberty Center focuses on career paths, not merely placing jobs. Liberty Center is where Candy Kriegar learned how to leverage her experience as a small business owner to land an administrative position with Utility Line Corporation.  It’s where Toyota Financial Services found Desitini Daniels, who went to Liberty Center to reboot her career after an employment contract ended.  RG Steel worker Robert Goode got the career counseling he needed to get hired as a welder.

 “We love what’s happening at Liberty.  Connecting job seekers with these amazing employers, that’s what it’s all about,” said Will Anderson, Director of the Baltimore County Department of Economic and Workforce Development.

Since opening in 2011, there has been no shortage of success, just as there is no shortage of opportunity – all it takes is a visit, and a commitment to the future.

Baltimore County Economic and Workforce Development, the Community College of Baltimore County and Social Services collaborate to deliver services and customized programs that get results. Utilizing the facility’s 2,500 student capacity, CCBC offers courses that train people for marketable jobs, while Workforce Development organizes onsite recruitments to help connect people with businesses that are hiring.

Liberty Center is one of three free career centers in Baltimore County, conveniently located in Randallstown, Hunt Valley and Eastpoint.   A convenient Mobile Career Center brings job search resources to communities throughout Baltimore County.  Stop in anytime and see how our career centers can change your life. You might just find your next job. And your next career.

Get directions to a Career Center and access the Mobile Career Center’s schedule of stops.

Don’t miss out on CCBC Randallstown’s Community Open House at the Liberty Center.

Find out more about Career Training and Community Education programs at CCBC Randallstown April 18, 12:00-3:00 pm, 3637 Offutt Road, Randallstown, MD 2113.  For more Open House information call 443-840-4700.

Was This Page Helpful?
Fields marked with * are required.
Page Rating*