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Baltimore County Now

Stay informed of what's happening in Baltimore County.
Keyword: utilities

graphic of storm clouds with lightningCaptain Leonard Ledford, Baltimore County Fire Department

A few weeks ago, inPart 1 of this blog, I covered thunderstorm watches, warnings and a few safety tips. Let’s pick up right where we left off, including some tips that apply just as well to the winter storms that are just around the corner.

Lightning rods attached to structures provide the safest pathway to ground for homes and businesses. If your home does not have one, the current from a lightning strike may travel via the home’s electrical or plumbing systems and could start a fire.  Also, remember to unplug sensitive electrical equipment such as computers and entertainment systems that are susceptible to electrical surges. You should seek shelter when the first rumble of thunder is heard, because if you can hear the thunder, you are close enough to the storm to be struck by lightning.  Also, remain inside for at least one-half hour after the thunder stops. 

Another electrical hazard that may be encountered in a storm is the possibility of downed electrical wires.  DO NOT try to approach or move these wires as there may be a ground current that could be deadly. If in a vehicle, do not try to drive over wires on the ground or under hanging wires near a roadway. Getting within several feet of a downed wire may cause it to arc.  If the 9/18/14wire is arcing or smoking, call 911 to report the hazard.

Downed power lines routinely lead to power outages in an area. Caution should be used when dealing with these situations as well.  Battery powered lights should be used instead of open flame candles and oil lamps due to their inherent fire dangers.  Portable generators produce deadly carbon monoxide gas that can build up and create a toxic atmosphere inside of a structure.  Several fatalities have been attributed to operating portable generators inside or too close to an occupied structure. Also, take care to utilize the proper gauge extension cords with the generator and do not overload them. 

Wind created by a severe thunderstorm can also be deadly.  Loose debris can be blown into the air and cause damage to structures and injure people.  If you do not have permanent mounted and operating shutters on your home, closing the blinds and drapes can provide a slight buffer against debris that may break and enter a window.  A heavy plastic trash bag or a tarp and duct tape should be available as a temporary repair in case of a window being broken during a storm.  Make a list of items that you want to bring inside in case of a severe thunderstorm.  Remember to include items such as plants, pool items, wind-chimes and flags.   Patio furniture, grills and items that are too large to be brought inside or cannot be placed in a garage or shed should be tied down and secured.  If there are large trees on your property they should be trimmed regularly to ensure that there are no dead branches that could be broken and fall in high winds.  Dead trees near a structure should be removed to prevent damage due to being blown over in a storm. 

Flash flooding commonly leads to flooded roadways. NEVER try to drive through standing or moving water. It only takes eighteen inches of water for a vehicle, including trucks and SUV’s, to become buoyant. Moving water can then push the vehicle sideways and it may rollover trapping occupants inside. When in doubt: Turn Around Don’t Drown!

Use easy to understand language to explain the sights and sounds that may be experienced by young children during a thunderstorm.  Once they understand what is making the “loud boom and bright light” outside, it may help reduce their apprehension and anxiety during a storm. 

Lastly, every home should have an emergency plan and an emergency kit that includes at a minimum:

·         enough food and water to last for 72 hours per person

·         a flashlight with spare batteries

·         a battery operated radio or weather radio

Severe weather planning resources can be found at:

·         The National Weather Service

·         Ready.gov

·         Baltimore County’s Emergency Management web site


photo of a construction siteEd Adams
Baltimore County Director of Public Works

Every once in a while you’ll hear in the national news about how our country is struggling to do basic maintenance and upgrade critical infrastructure like bridges, roads and water and sewer systems. Here in Baltimore County, thanks to strong fiscal management and a proactive approach to basic maintenance, we are working hard to keep our systems in good working order and ensure the safety of the public.

These maintenance and repair projects are great real-world examples of why it matters that the County is repeatedly awarded the highest possible bond rating. We are one of only 39 counties in the entire United States with a triple triple-A bond rating. Basically, it costs us less to finance important capital projects, so we are able to do more of them.

I am proud of the Administration, as well as the employees and contractors of the Department of Public Works, who have taken strides toward bringing the County's infrastructure into the 21st century - improving, rebuilding, modernizing and replacing bridges, roads, water mains, reservoirs, pumping stations, storm drains, sewer lines and man holes. At Public Works we strive to run our department based on common sense, accountability and compassion. 

Here’s a quick overview of the County’s investment over the past three years:

Water

$115.5 million for water projects, from FY 2011 to FY2013

            $8.7 million to clean and line pipes

            $35.9 million to lay new water pipes

            $7.7 million for new pumping stations and storage tanks

            $63.2 million to fund City/County facilities: reservoirs & treatment plants

Sewers

$228.1  million

            $11 million to reline sewer pipes

            $5.3 million for new sewer lines

            $47.8 million to rebuild 20 pumping stations

            $76.5 million to fund City/County facilities, including treatment plants

            $87.5 million for design, modeling, studies, and investigation

Bridges

$14 million

            $5.6 million to replace 7 bridges

            $7.8 million to repair 5 bridges

            $0.6 million for 2 wetland projects

Road Construction, Sidewalks & Alleys

$44.1 million  25 projects including:

            $17 million for Owings Mills Boulevard

            $7.5 million for Cherry Hill Road

            $2.2 million for alleys

Utilities

$24.2 million

            $19.6 million to inspect 676 miles of pipes & manholes with video/other methods

            $4.6 million to clean 1,575 miles of pipe

Solid Waste

$43 million

            $9 million for the Central Acceptance Facility Transfer Station

            $14 million for Central Acceptance Facility Single Stream Recycling System

            $6 million to cap the Hernwood landfill

            $.43 million for Parkton Landfill remediation

            $1.5 million for Hernwood Landfill remediation

            $12.1 million for Eastern Sanitary Landfill remediation

Highways

$50 million

            $41.8 million to pave 220 miles

            $8.2 million to install 67.5 miles of curb and gutter

Storm Drains

$5.6 million

            $3.1 million to replace pipes and inlets for 36 projects

            $1.2 million to design and install new drains and inlets for 25 projects

            $1.3 million to fund flood studies, to locate utilities and computer support

Traffic

$5.1 million

$.75 million for new and replacement traffic signals (includes new battery backups for 10 intersections)

            $.25 million to provide traffic calming in 93 communities

            $ 4.1 million to paint 3500 miles of road lines and install and maintain 22,700 signs


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