Skip Navigation

Image of the Baltimore County Historic Courthouse

Baltimore County News

Stay informed of what's happening in Baltimore County.
Keyword: umbc

Free public event offers information and resources

The Baltimore County Department of Health will hold its 17th Annual Behavioral Health Town Hall Meeting and Health Fair from 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., Wednesday, October 19 at Oregon Ridge Park’s Lodge (13401 Beaver Dam Road) in Cockeysville, Maryland.

The purpose of this event is to provide participants with information about tobacco cessation and peer recovery support while:

  • Learning about behavioral health resources in Baltimore County.
  • Receiving information and resources on wellness and health-related topics from panelists.
  • Participating in a question and answer open forum.
  • Hearing from keynote speaker Carlos DiClemente, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology, from the University of Maryland Baltimore County.

Behavioral Health disorders are common health conditions that impact many County residents. Baltimore County has a comprehensive network of mental health and substance abuse services including outpatient, residential, rehabilitation, case management, and crisis services, as well as specialized programs for both children and adults. Over 19,000 clients a year receive services in the Baltimore County behavioral health system.

The event is free and open to the public. For additional information about this event, contact Venus Rankin-Waters, LCSW-C with the Department of Health at 410-887-3828 or To reserve a vendor table, contact Susan Parks with the Mental Health Association of Maryland at 410-235-1178 ext. 205 or

For information on behavioral health services in Baltimore County, call 410-887-3828 or visit

patriotic star imageAmerican Job Centers Offer Opportunity

Veterans Day gives us an opportunity to reflect on how grateful we are for the sacrifices so many give serving in our armed forces. That reflection isn’t limited to November 11. 

Baltimore County’s three American Job Centers are working to help veterans put their military skills and experience to work back at home. More often than not, veterans have a robust skill set, but are struggling to translate their military experience to a language that employers in the civilian world understand.

“Our job is to bring veterans into the 21st century labor market through skills enhancement, occupational training and labor market information,” explains Leo Martinelli, Baltimore County’s Manager of Service Innovation for the Baltimore County Department of Economic and Workforce Development. 

Veterans facing unemployment due to service-connected disabilities can also access special Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) representatives through the American Job Centers. State and County staff work to make critical services more accessible to vets with especially challenging circumstances. In addition to two veterans outreach representatives at the Eastpoint American Job Center, the Maryland Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation is now stationing a full-time vet rep, Careatha Burton, at the Liberty Job Center in Randallstown.

“Veterans face many challenges. In some cases the first hurdle is finding the veteran a home. Next it’s helping navigate the process of other critical support, such as support for coping with Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome (PSTD), healthcare, and transportation to name a few. Once that foundation is built we begin crafting a way to employment,” explains Careatha.  

Careatha’s Story – From Unemployed Veteran to Career Counselor

As a veteran who once found herself unemployed, Careatha has firsthand experience using services at a County job center. Careatha enlisted in the U.S. Army Reserve after graduating from Woodlawn High School in 1987. During her service, she became the first in her family to graduate from college with a B.S. in Applied Psychology and a Master of Science Degree in Rehabilitation Counseling. Careatha got a job as a workforce development counselor out of state. When the grant funded program ended, she was out of work. 

Careatha came back home to find a job. The Liberty Center in Randallstown was her first stop. “As a workforce development professional, I knew all the resources available at the job centers. It’s a great networking opportunity and so many jobs are found through people you know.” 

“Here is the cool part, Careatha is now helping other veterans at the very place she started her journey," explained Will Anderson, Director of Economic and Workforce Development for Baltimore County. “And, helping our veterans with career services in Baltimore County doesn’t stop at our American Job Centers.  Patrick Young leads the way at Towson University.  Keisha Campbell helps veterans at UMBC. CCBC has a long history of educating veterans, and has a certifying official at each campus.  Finally, Goucher College and Stevenson University also focus on their vets.”

Help is Available

If you have a loved one, neighbor, friend or fellow veteran facing unemployment or in need of help, please tell them about our job centers. The County’s  Homefront: Our Turn to Serve initiative  also offers coordinated services to returning veterans. 

Our veterans served us. Now it’s time to serve our veterans.  

Bryan Dunn
Baltimore County Department of Economic and Workforce Development

video link imageBaltimore County Draws Global Leaders in Cybersecurity

Innovation at Baltimore County’s cybersecurity companies helps protect our country, our identities and our bank accounts.

University of Maryland Baltimore County’s cybersecurity incubator and CyberHive, Cybersecurity@Towson University, IT-cyber talent (There are over 75,000 employed in cybersecurity-related jobs and over 20,000 open cyber positions in the region.), and proximity to major federal agencies make Baltimore County a prime place to start and grow a cyber business.

We caught up with local startup cyber companies and national consultants at the annual CyberMD conference. Baltimore County works for companies fighting global cyber-attacks (video). 


Revised September 26, 2016