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Baltimore County Now

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Keyword: sparrows point

photo of Star of Bethlehem at Sparrows PointKevin Kamenetz, Baltimore County Executive

It’s hard to find a longtime Baltimore County resident who doesn’t know someone who worked at Sparrows Point -- a family member, a friend, a neighbor, or a co-worker.  Over more than 125 years, tens of thousands of men and women worked at the Sparrows Point steel mill, and at many other businesses connected to steelmaking.

The Point provided good paying jobs that supported families for generations.

Working here was more than a job.  Whether you were in the hot mill, the tin mill or the cold mill; whether you worked in the office or drove a truck, working at the Point meant knowing that your hard work was making a difference.

Baltimore County steel helped keep America strong -- it was vital to the effort during two World Wars. Baltimore County steel stands in our nation’s infrastructure, from the Golden Gate Bridge to the Chesapeake Bay Bridge.   

Part of my job as Baltimore County Executive is to step back and look at the big picture, to see how we can make the most of what makes our County great. At Sparrows Point, I see everything we need to bring back jobs for this generation -- and for generations to come.

The basis for our optimism is simple. Sparrows Point has a unique combination of assets that just can’t be found anywhere else along the East Coast: more than five square miles of industrially zoned land, deepwater access, and infrastructure and transportation, including rail service right to the front door.

Most exciting are the opportunities for expansion of the Port and port-related uses. We have every reason to believe that the Port could easily bring 10,000 new, family-supporting jobs back to the Point.  Advanced manufacturing, distribution and logistics, and clean energy could add even more jobs.    

There’s one more vital asset:  we have people who work hard and work smart.  These are workers who know what it means to put in a good day’s work for a good day’s pay. 

Let’s face it: being a steelworker wasn’t the easiest job. The work was always hard and often dangerous. It took a combination of brains and brawn. But talk to any steelworker from any generation, and you’ll learn there’s something about working here that created a special bond that will last for generations, through good times and bad.

Shortly after the mighty L-furnace was built, steelworkers welded the “Star of Bethlehem” to its tower and lit it as a symbol of strength, pride and hope. I am pleased that the new owners of the property, Sparrows Point Terminal, are preserving the Star to help all of us, and future generations, stay connected to these values.

Let’s join with former steelworkers and their families as we look toward a bright future for the men and women of steel. We can all learn from their legacy.


photo of Benjamin Banneker museumAdam J. Youssi, Historical Society of Baltimore County

Unknowingly, most of us go about our daily lives oblivious to the fact we are living, working and traveling beside sites in Baltimore County representing the full gamut of African American history.  A simple drive around the Baltimore Beltway takes you within a stone’s throw of historic plantation-style slave sites; past neighborhoods where more than 400 enslaved African Americans joined the Union Army in the Civil War; adjacent to safe houses that once provided refuge to runaway slaves heading north along the Underground Railroad; next to buildings used for segregation during the Jim Crow era, and by a Baltimore County public school, still in use, where the strategy to overturn public school segregation nationwide originated. Yet, this short list barely scratches the surface of the quantity of Baltimore County sites directly connecting us to the tumultuous history of African Americans.  While some of the sites may be graced with an interpretive historic marker, others may have no markings whatsoever to indicate their significance. Allow us to take a brief tour to a few sites in recognition and celebration of African American history month. 

PLANTATION STYLE SLAVERY

Perhaps the best-known site of African American historical significance in the county is operated by the National Park Service in Towson. It is a stately home and property named Hampton. Hampton was home not only to seven generations of the economically and politically influential Ridgely family, from 1745 to 1948, but also to more than 500 slaves over a 100 year period.  Visit Hampton National Historic Site to find out about their interpreted historic tours.  

UNDERGROUND RAILROAD SAFE HOUSES

Lesser known are Baltimore County’s safe houses that were utilized by runaway slaves on the Underground Railroad prior to emancipation.  Union Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church, a congregation in existence since c. 1822, hid runaway slaves who were making their way north, across the border, into Pennsylvania. Another is named the Emmart-Pierpoint Safe House, located at 3523 North Rolling Road near Liberty Road, in Rockdale.  This more than 200 year old home is a direct reminder of the atrocities of a slave system that shackled millions, while also standing as a testament to the triumph of the human spirit and the empathy and kindness of perfect strangers in perilous times.  The house was donated to Emmarts United Methodist Church, at 7100 Dogwood Road in Windsor Mill in the nineteenth century to act as a safe haven for runaways. This safe house originally stood near the church prior to being relocated to its current location.  (Reference: Chris Kaltenbach, Baltimore Sun, April 2, 2011; Louis S. Diggs.)

HISTORIC COMMUNITIES

East Towson, Turner Station in Dundalk and Winters Lane in Catonsville are among Baltimore County’s historically significant African American communities.  East Towson developed as an African American community from the mid-1800s into the early 1900s.  Many former slaves of the Ridgely family at Hampton, less than two miles north of East Towson, settled in the area, forming the core of the early community. 

Winters Lane, now on the National Register of Historic Places, grew between the 1860s and the 1940s in Catonsville, and represented a cohesive African American community that developed in the wake of the Civil War. 

Turner Station, located in the far southeast of Baltimore County, at the edge of Dundalk, grew into Baltimore County’s largest African American community after emancipation as a byproduct of the growing steel industry in that area in the 1880s.  With industry booming at the Pennsylvania Steel Company (later Bethlehem Steel) in Sparrows Point, and housing in short supply, African Americans from Virginia, North Carolina and South Carolina settled nearby in Turner Station, where they brought their religion and culture with them.  (Reference: National Register of Historic Places Inventory Nomination form – East Towsonat the Maryland State Archives; Maryland Historical Trust; Louis S. Diggs, It All Started On Winters Lane.)

STRUCTURES USED FOR SEGREGATION

Next to the historic Baltimore County Almshouse in Cockeysville, constructed as refuge for the county’s poor, indigent and mentally ill, is a lesser known building referred to as the Pest House. The term Pest House is short for pestilence house.  historic photo of the Pest House in CockeysvilleThe Pest House was intended to be used to house the sick or those with communicable diseases in an era before germ theory was widely understood or adopted.  However, documentation suggests the Pest House was more commonly used for the purpose of segregating African American men from the rest of the Almshouse “inmates,” as they were called.  Meanwhile, African American women were permitted to reside within the main building, perhaps because the women were far less racialized than the men.  With the support of the Historical Society of Baltimore County, who have called the Baltimore County Almshouse their headquarters for more than fifty-years, African American historian Louis S. Diggs is working to secure funding to rehabilitate the Pest House and ultimately make it habitable while preserving its historic integrity.  (Reference: Patrick Cutter, “Upland Home,” Historical Society of Baltimore County’s History Trails; Raven Hill, Baltimore Sun, July 31, 2011.)

SEPARATE IS NOT EQUAL – CATONSVILLE HIGH SCHOOL

At Catonsville High School, in 1936, a young black girl named Margaret Zimmer was denied admission by the school’s principal based on the color of her skin.  Her denial was routine due to the Plessy v. Ferguson Supreme Court case of 1896 which legalized segregation.   Black children could only attend one of three dedicated black schools in Baltimore City because no black schools existed in the county.  The venerable Thurgood Marshall used the equal protection clause of the Fourteenth Amendment to argue that Margaret Zimmer should be admitted.  Although Marshall ultimately failed at the time, his argument was the foundation of the legal strategy that ultimately led to his success in 1954 in Brown v. Board of Education, ending legal segregation in public schools nationwide.  (The Maryland State Archives hosts most documents related to Margaret Zimmer and the Catonsville High School case online.)


NOTABLE AFRICAN AMERICANS & BALTIMORE COUNTY

The sheer volume of notable African Americans who called Baltimore County home is, much like the historic sites, too vast to encompass in a brief article. But among them is a former slave named Augustus Walley, from Bond Avenue in Reisterstown, who was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor in 1879 for bravery on the Western Frontier.  Benjamin Banneker, who has been called “The First African-American Man of Science,” was a largely self-taught scientist, astronomer, farmer, surveyor and almanac author who corresponded with Thomas Jefferson. Banneker’s legacy is shared by the volunteers and staff at the Benjamin Banneker Museum (300 Oella Ave, Oella) in western Baltimore County.  There, at least one direct descendant of Banneker still works with the museum and its staff. (Reference: Louis S. Diggs; Carol Sorgen, Baltimore Beacon, February 2013.)

Finally, there is no greater steward of Baltimore County’s African American history and heritage than someone I have had the honor and privilege to call a friend and colleague - Louis S. Diggs.  I have no doubt that Mr. Diggs’ list of notable African Americans and sites in Baltimore County would be far more comprehensive than this if he did not already have his hands full managing an African American history non-profit organization, implementing grants to renovate and restore historic African American structures around Baltimore County, finishing his book about slaves in the County who joined the Union Army in the Civil War, or most recently sitting atop the grandstand in Washington D.C. representing African Americans who served in the Korean-American War.

In sum, this is but a taste of the wide array of sites and people the county has to offer in the way of African American history and heritage. We could go many more pages more exploring additional sites:  the one-room, African-American schoolhouse in Piney Gove, Boring, dating to the mid-1800s, Mt. Gilboa A.M.E. Church in Oella, which may be the oldest active African American church in the County, dating to the late 1700s, the former Croxall estate named Garrison Ridge (now generally referred to as Garrison Forest ), which was home to dozens of slaves - the property now entirely subdivided into a quaint suburban community.  Or, we could explore more notable figures, such as Henrietta Lacks, whose cells from a cancerous tumor still live on and have been used around the world to benefit countless medical and scientific studies.  The list goes on, but only if you decide to take a closer look and put in a little effort. 

For more information on Baltimore County African American history, visit the Historical Society of Baltimore County. You may visit online or in person at the historic almshouse at 9811 Van Buren Lane in Cockeysville. Or, you may follow the society on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.


photo of large bridge construction componenetsFronda Cohen
Baltimore County Office of Communications

A tunnel project in Virginia has brought new jobs to Sparrows Point. Let me explain. 

These days, if you walk along the dry dock at the Sparrows Point Shipyard and Industrial Park in Dundalk, you’ll see huge concrete tubes in the making.  Let me define huge. These sections of reinforced concrete are 32 inches thick and wide enough in diameter to fit more than two lanes of traffic.  The tubes are being manufactured by SKW Constructors for a tunnel project in Hampton Roads, Virginia.

SKW and its subcontractors have hired about 100 carpenters, concrete finishers, mechanics, structural and reinforcing iron workers, surveyors, truck drivers and laborers for the massive project.  These positions already are filled, but SKW is currently hiring certified crane operators. 

“SKW is a huge boost in the County’s efforts to bring new businesses and new jobs back to Sparrows Point,” said Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz. 

Senator Norman Stone recalled the great manufacturing tradition at the Sparrows Point shipyard.  “Workers at Sparrows Point built Liberty Ships here during World War II.  Even though it isn’t ship building, it is good to see some manufacturing jobs back at the shipyard.  I am hopeful that these jobs will be performed by local workers.”

In Sparrows Point, SKW found a perfect location for heavy industrial construction and shipping, taking advantage of one of the largest privately owned graving docks on the east coast.

By next winter, the first sections of tunnel tubes should be finished, floated out of the dock, and shipped by barge to Virginia for the Elizabeth River Tunnels project.  As soon as the first shipment is on its way, construction of another five sections begins, along with production of huge industrial fans to circulate air in the tunnels.

“It feels good to know we’re exporting a little bit of Sparrows Point down to Virginia,” said County Executive Kamenetz.  “This is the beginning of what promises to be a brand new Sparrows Point with thousands of new jobs coming to the region.  I am committed to building on this good news, and our next step is to ensure that the Port of Baltimore expands its operation to Sparrows Point as soon as possible.  I will do everything that I can to work with Port and State officials to move that process forward.”

To see the size of the concrete tunnel tubes, check out this slide show.


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