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Keyword: school construction

County in Final Stages of Building 16 New Schools, 12 Additions and 7 Major Renovations 

Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz included funds in his FY18 budget to accelerate the construction of four elementary schools in the County. Berkshire and Colgate Elementary Schools in Dundalk as well as Bedford Elementary in Pikesville and Chadwick Elementary in Woodlawn are all being moved forward by two or three years.

“With every school that we complete, we are one step closer to finishing the work we started in 2011,” said Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz. “With our $1.3 billion Schools for our Future program, we are in the final stages of building 16 new schools, 12 additions, and 7 comprehensive renovations. I am very proud of this historic progress.”

Berkshire and Colgate elementary schools in Dundalk will now open in August 2020. Berkshire was originally scheduled to open in 2022 and Colgate in 2023. Bedford will now open in 2021, two years ahead of the original 2023 date. Chadwick will open in 2020 as opposed to 2023.

Schools for Our Future is Baltimore County’s $1.3 billion school construction program to upgrade facilities and provide modern learning environments for students and teachers.

The County Council will vote on Baltimore County’s FY18 budget May 25, 2017.


By Kevin Kamenetz, Baltimore County Executive

For 90 days in Annapolis, we fought hard, testified at hearings, and made our case for Baltimore County. We secured a total of $942 million in State funding for education, health, public safety, transportation, school construction, road and infrastructure projects in our County. We fought for new laws to protect victims of sexual assault, combat skyrocketing drug prices, overhaul the cash bail system, grow our craft brewing industry, and protect the Bay by extending Maryland’s fracking ban. With strong support and advocacy from Baltimore County’s State delegates and senators, we brought it home from Annapolis.

State funding for County priorities

Baltimore County secured $841 million in State aid for education, libraries, the Community College of Baltimore County, health, public safety, recreation and open space. 

Why it matters  As Maryland’s third largest jurisdiction with a growing population, Baltimore County residents deserve their fair share of State funding. State and County funds protect and improve our quality of life, from 21st century libraries and community college to parks and open space for our neighborhoods. 

State funding for school construction

Secured $48.3 million in State matching funds toward public school construction. 

Why it matters  The County’s $1.3 billion Schools for Our Future school construction program will eliminate overcrowding, modernize facilities and add air conditioning. The ten-year initiative, the largest single school construction program in Maryland, is building 16 new schools, 12 additions, and 7 major renovations.

Easing traffic congestion to support job growth

Delivered $50 million in State funding for transportation projects in Owings Mills, Sparrows Point, White Marsh and around the beltway.  

Why it matters  Most of the Baltimore beltway is in Baltimore County. Funding beltway widening is critical to ease traffic congestion, especially during commuter rush hours. Other projects in key employment areas include the Dolfield Avenue interchange on I-795, widening Philadelphia Road from Mohrs Lane to Campbell Boulevard, and bus routes and bridge repair at Sparrows Point.

Supporting local breweries

Maryland craft brewers can now sell more beer at their production taprooms. 

Why it matters The new law opens opportunities for Baltimore County brewers Heavy Seas, Key Brewing, Du Claw and White Marsh Brewing Company. Coming soon: a new $50 million Guinness innovation brewery in Relay, bringing 70 jobs and a major tourist attraction for Baltimore County.

Combating high drug prices

The County supported a new law that allows the Maryland attorney general to sue drug companies when prices of generic drugs soar dramatically.

Why it matters We all pay when drug companies drive up their prices. Baltimore County insures thousands of local government workers.

Protect victims of sexual assault

“No means no.” We fought for a law that simplifies the definition of rape and sexual assault. Police departments now must store rape kits for 20 years.

Why it matters This new law puts the focus on the actions of the person accused of assault, not the victim, and preserves evidence for police and prosecutors during investigations. 

Overhauling the cash bail system

Supported a new State law that overhauls the cash-based bail system for defendants awaiting trial. 

Why it matters Defendants should not be penalized just because they can’t afford cash bail. The issues for a judge should be whether the defendant is a threat to the community and can be relied on to return to court.

Baltimore County does not operate in a vacuum. Policy and funding decisions at the State level have direct and often lasting impact on everyone living and working here. We will continue to fight for the resources that Baltimore County residents need and deserve. 

Protecting the Chesapeake

Supported extension of Maryland’s fracking ban.   

Why it matters Protecting the Chesapeake Bay and our water supply is fundamental.   

Baltimore County does not operate in a vacuum. Policy and funding decisions at the State level have direct and often lasting impact on everyone living and working here. We will continue to fight for the resources that Baltimore County residents need and deserve. 


Adds more than 1,700 seats to address middle school overcrowding in the northeast area

Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz announced today that the budget he presents to the County Council this Thursday will include $7 million in planning and design funding for a new 1,500 seat middle school in Perry Hall and a 200-300 seat addition at Pine Grove Middle School to relieve overcrowding in the northeast area. Construction on the projects is expected to begin in 2019 with the school and addition opening in 2021.

“I have been reviewing this issue for over a year. Superintendent Dance and his team proposed a solution for the Perry Hall area, and I am delighted to include funding for these projects in my budget proposal,” said Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz.

In 2011, Baltimore County Executive Kamenetz embarked on a $1.3 billion Schools for our Future program to address the school system’s dual dilemma of rising enrollment and aging infrastructure.  It’s the most ambitious school construction initiative in the history of the State in such a short period of time.

With those funds, the County is building, or is in the midst of building, 16 new schools, 12 additions and 7 significant renovations. Baltimore County has contributed $2 for every dollar from the State to complete these projects.

"We are extremely appreciative the County Executive has addressed our need for middle school seats. By focusing on a comprehensive solution, we can now work to bring relief to several of our middle schools that are at capacity or scheduled to be within the upcoming years," said Dr. S. Dallas Dance, Baltimore County Public School Superintendent.

“We have spent a tremendous amount of money in the County and in my district on school construction over the past six years, but the issue of middle school overcrowding was an area that still required a solution,” said 6th District Councilwoman Cathy Bevins. “I’ve been talking with Dr. Dance and the County Executive about funding projects to address this issue, and adding 1,700 middle school seats in the northeast area is great news. It would make real sense to build the new school on the Nottingham property that the school system already owns.”

“This is fantastic,” said long-time Perry Hall advocate Bill Paulshock, who graduated from both Perry Hall Middle and Perry Hall High. “Since the day he was elected, County Executive Kamenetz has supported the Perry Hall-White Marsh area more than any elected official in history. His commitment to recreation and parks and our schools is nothing short of phenomenal.”

“By any standard, this is remarkable progress,” said Kamenetz. “Our students and teachers deserve no less.”


 
 
Revised September 26, 2016