Baltimore County Now
Print this page.
 
Baltimore County Now - News You Can Use

Baltimore County Now

Stay informed of what's happening in Baltimore County.
Keyword: planning

Summer Food Safety, 9-1-1 Know-How and CZMP

The July edition of Baltimore County’s half-hour cable television public affairs show, “Hello Baltimore County,” highlights the following topics:

Food Safety Tips to Keep from Spoiling Your Summer Fun – When temperatures soar, food-borne illness has a field day! Find out how to keep your picnic food and your family safe.

Make the Right Call – Baltimore County’s 9-1-1 Center Assistant Chief shares how to help emergency responders help you when you call 9-1-1.

Comprehensive Zoning Map Process – Every four years, you have the chance to request a zoning change on property in Baltimore County. Find out how, and why it matters to your community.

View streaming video of the show.

In addition to online access, the program runs several times per week on Cable Channel 25, in Baltimore County, at the following times:

  • Mondays: 1:30 p.m., 6 p.m.
  • Tuesdays: 12 p.m., 9 p.m.
  • Wednesdays: 11 a.m., 4 p.m., 10 p.m.
  • Thursdays: 1 p.m., 8 p.m.
  • Fridays: 11 a.m., 6 p.m.
  • Saturdays: 10 a.m., 3 p.m., 7 p.m.
  • Sundays: 10 a.m., 3 p.m., 7 p.m.

montage of imagesTeri Rising, Historic Preservation Planner
Department of Planning

While it is hard to believe today, educational opportunities for young women were not readily available during the mid-19th century in the United States.  In Baltimore County, we are fortunate to have several historic schools that were founded for the primary purpose of educating young women.  These institutions were made possible by the shared vision of women and religious organizations who provided the resources necessary for their establishment.  While their historic campuses feature a variety of 19th century architectural styles, together they tell a story of those who dedicated their lives to the mission of educating young women.  In honor of Women’s History Month, let’s learn about some of these historically significant schools. 

Just outside of historic Reisterstown is the former Hannah More Academy campus which was established in 1832.  Built on land donated by Mrs. Ann Neilson, the former girls’ Episcopal boarding and day school provided education to young women until it merged with Saint Timothy’s School in Greenspring Valley in 1974.  While the original school buildings were lost to fire in 1857, the school was rebuilt and today houses various nonprofit offices and recreational space.  Located on the campus is the Gothic Revival board and batten Saint Michael’s Chapel, a National Register property and Baltimore County Landmark. 

photo of Mount de SalesThe Mount de Sales Academy has been educating young women within the walls of its historic campus in Catonsville since 1852.  Organized by the Sisters of the Visitation, this was the first Catholic institution in Baltimore County to provide educational opportunities to young women of all religions and backgrounds.  The school is also significant as the oldest educational facility in the County still actively in use for its original purpose.  The 19th century collection of campus buildings are on the National Register of Historic Places and the Baltimore County Landmarks List.

photo of Oldfields SchoolOldfields School is situated in the former village of Glencoe that grew with the arrival of the railroad in 1838.  Located near the Gunpowder River, Oldfields School was founded by Mrs. Anna Austen McCulloch in 1867.  The school began in her mid-19th century double tenant house, now a Baltimore County Landmark, and referred to on campus as the “Old House”. Unlike many early schools for young women, Oldfields was not affiliated with any particular denomination and was known for its progressive curriculum which featured subjects and activities not easily found in other institutions of the time. 

Further Reading-

To learn more about the history of women’s education along with these historic schools:

National Women’s History Museum – The History of Women and Education

Baltimore County’s National Register properties

Baltimore County’s Final Landmarks

Mount De Sales Academy

Oldfields School


photo of bike rider in a bike lane

Sheldon Epstein, Chair, Baltimore County Pedestrian and Bicycle Advisory Committee

Cyclists and Motorists – Be Safe Out There

Over the past several weeks Department of Public Works contractors have been posting bike route signs and marking bike lanes in the Towson area to encourage us to leave our cars at home and try cycling. The Towson “Bike Beltway” Loop is only one of several new on-road bikeways that are being planned in Towson and other areas in the county.

With these improvements, Baltimore County is joining the growing number of cities, towns and counties throughout the US that are offering bicycling as an active transportation option. The county is making it easier for us to choose to bike, especially for those of us who live close to shopping, work, transit or parks. Cycling is an earth-friendly and healthy way to get around, as long as we do it safely. And it’s not just cyclists that may need a safety refresher. Many drivers who are not used to encountering bikes on the road could benefit from a few traffic safety reminders too.

So, let’s review a few of the rules of the road to help keep everyone safe and happy.

Bikes Belong.Some motorists think roadways are meant to be used only by cars, trucks and buses. But in fact, state law recognizes bicycles as vehicles, and allows them on almost all roadways. Those “Share the Road” signs you see occasionally are posted to alert drivers to expect to encounter cyclists on popular bike routes. But sharing the road is something that motorists and bicyclists should do wherever bicycles are permitted.

Obey the Rules of the Road.Since they are vehicles, bicyclists are expected to obey traffic safety laws. They are required to ride in the same direction as the motor traffic, and stop at stop signs and red traffic signals just as cars do.  Slower moving cyclists are to stay to the right hand side of the road to allow motorists to pass them more easily, a law that also applies to motor vehicles. Cyclists are allowed to move left when needed to protect their safety, pass slower moving bicyclists, or make left turns.  When passing a cyclist, a new law requires motorists to leave at least three feet of separation.

Be Careful in Intersections: Many traffic accidents (including those with bikes) happen at intersections. So, motorists--yield to cyclists as you would to any other vehicle. Be aware that it can be easy for you to underestimate how fast a bicycle is traveling. Experienced cyclists can be moving at 20-25 m.p.h. or more. And cyclists—always use appropriate hand signals before you turn so that your intentions are clear.

Wear the Helmet: Cyclists 16 and older are not required to wear a helmet, but it’s just a good safety practice. OK, they aren’t that fashionable, but accidents do happen, so protect the most important part of your body–your brain.

Avoid “Dooring”:Bicyclists riding adjacent to parked cars are especially leery of disembarking drivers opening their car doors in their paths. This can really hurt!  Both exiting drivers and passing cyclists need to pay special attention when cars are parked on the road.

Please Don’t Yell or Throw Things: Drivers can get frustrated when they get behind a slower moving bicycle. But please take a deep breath, and wait calmly until it is safe to pass. And cyclists–follow the rules, be courteous, and enjoy the ride safely!

For more safety tips, check out: http://mhso.mva.maryland.gov/SafetyPrograms/program_bicycle_safety.htm


Was This Page Helpful?
Fields marked with * are required.
Page Rating*