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Baltimore County Now

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Keyword: pikesville

Klein Enterprises Purchase

When Klein Enterprises purchased a small vacant commercial building on Hooks Lane, it launched a positive chain of events that will bring new private investment, jobs and improved traffic flow to Pikesville.   

The building at 7 Hooks Lane will be demolished to clear the way for road improvements and access for a new office building to be constructed at Commerce Center. Klein Enterprises will convey the property to the County, providing the right of way needed to continue a second lane on Hooks Lane to Reisterstown Road.  

“With the developer stepping up, we can finally alleviate traffic back-ups along this stretch of Hooks Lane while saving the County over $350,000 in right of way costs,” said Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz. “This literally paves the way for a new office building at Commerce Center and clears concerns about future traffic congestion.”   

The proposed new Commerce Center office building will be a 40,000 square foot, two story expansion on top of an existing parking garage and infrastructure. The building features expansive windows for light-filled offices. 

Neighborhod Improvement

“Since Klein Enterprises acquired the Commerce Center in 2011, we have invested millions of dollars into the property,” said Daniel Klein, President of Klein Enterprises. “We hope to continue improving the neighborhood by working with the County to bring another Class A office building to the Pikesville business community and improving traffic along Hooks Lane.”

“This public-private partnership is a good economic development project for Pikesville, it adds to the tax base, helps retailers by bringing more workers to a new office building, and offers another ‘work where you live’ opportunity,” said Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz.  "As a side benefit, it will resolve a long-standing community complaint of traffic congestion that has been frequently raised since I was first elected to the County Council in 1994. I'm glad we are finally getting it done."

Once any appeals are resolved and final permits are issued to Klein Enterprises for construction of the new building, a resolution to convey the land to the County will be presented to the County Council and roadway construction can begin.

39 Locally Owned Businesses to be Recognized

Catonsville Main StreetThirty-nine locally owned businesses will be recognized for their contributions to the well-being of Baltimore County’s traditional commercial districts.

“Our local business districts and their retail entrepreneurs add to the quality of life we enjoy. These unique shops, restaurants and services are central to the communities they serve,” said Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz.

The Baltimore County Department of Planning invited chambers of commerce and business associations to nominate outstanding individuals, institutions and locally owned businesses that have made an impact in economic vitality, design, promotion, sustainability and leadership.

The following nominees will be recognized at a reception and awards ceremony June 3 at the UMBC University Center Ballroom.   

Best Neighborhood Service/Retailer/Restaurant

Calico Cat (Security/Woodlawn)
EarthTouch Healing Arts (Dundalk)
Caton Auto Clinic (Catonsville)
State Farm (Liberty Road)
Colin’s Seafood & Grill (Liberty Road)
Dunkin’ Donuts (Liberty Road)
Herb & Soul (Loch Raven)
Gourmet Again (Pikesville)
The Grill at Harryman House (Reisterstown)

Best New Construction using Architect on Call and/or Business Improvement Loan

Ristorante Firenze (Reisterstown)

Best Small-Scale Façade Improvement
Dugan’s Liquors (Pikesville)
Main Street Grill (Reisterstown)
Fractured Prune (Towson)
Bob Davidson Ford (Loch Raven)

Outstanding Community Event
Catonsville Arts and Crafts Festival (Catonsville)
Dundalk Heritage Fair (Dundalk)
Concerts in the Park (Dundalk)
Holiday Event and National Night Out (Liberty Road)
Overlea Community Tree Lighting (Overlea)
Spring Concert Series (Parkville)

Best Marketing Campaign
Ristorante Firenze (Reisterstown)
Towson Tipster App (Towson)
Shop the ‘Ville (Catonsville)
Member Spotlight Mondays (Parkville)

Best Business/Organization Website
Liberty Road Community Calendar (Liberty Road)
Parkville Carney Business Association (Parkville)
The Grill at Harryman House (Reisterstown)

Best Clean-up or Greening Project 
Paradise Community Association (Catonsville)
Randallstown Gateway Park (Liberty Road)

Best Advocate

Dundalk Renaissance Corporation (Dundalk)
Coldwell Banker (Catonsville)
Liberty Road Volunteer Fire Department (Liberty Road)
Jason Plotkin, President Parkville Carney Business Association (Parkville)
Carin Smith, Reisterstown Improvement Association (Reisterstown)

Best Community Institution
The Children’s Home (Catonsville)
Dundalk Chamber of Commerce (Dundalk)
Northwest Hospital (Liberty Road)

Young Entrepreneur 
Erin Travis, Trails & Tails Pet Care (Catonsville)
Tim Bojanowski, Zest Social Media (Towson)

“Keeping our older commercial areas strong is a priority for Baltimore County. The Commercial Revitalization Program offers tools to support small businesses in 17 older commercial areas throughout the County,” said Andrea Van Arsdale, Director of the Baltimore County Department of Planning. "We encourage businesses and commercial property owners to work with our revitalization representatives to access district tax credits, architectural design services to improve the exterior of buildings, loans to help implement improvements and other technical assistance.”

More information about the Baltimore County Commercial Revitalization Program is available on line or by calling 410-887-3480.

photo of a Victorian home in Sudbrook ParkFronda Cohen, Baltimore County Office of Communications

When we moved to Sudbrook Park in 1988, we had never heard the word “curvilinear.” After many walks through this historic community in Pikesville, we soon learned about the pleasures of curving, winding roads and the history of a neighborhood that in 1889 became an experiment in suburban community design.

Frederick Law Olmsted, Sr., the father of landscape architecture in America, is perhaps best known as co-designer of New York City’s Central Park. His “experiment” in Baltimore County was based on the idea that a suburban village would be an attractive alternative to the densely populated city. 

Olmsted designed Sudbrook with a distinct entranceway, a narrow bridge that led to open green spaces for community gatherings, spacious lots for Victorian cottages, and smaller lots for more affordable homes. The setting was green, with mature trees lining winding roads that encouraged walking, enjoying nature, and meeting neighbors along the way.

Olmsted’s gateway bridge at the entrance to Sudbrook Park still spans the rail line, although 125 years later it is the Metro that shares the tracks with the railroad that once took residents downtown to work. On any given day, you’ll find walkers, runners, and bicyclists exploring the curvilinear roads.  Victorian homes still grace streets lined with centuries-old oaks. Neat brick colonials built during World War II anchor the smaller lots. Neighbors, kids and dogs in tow, enjoy the annual July 4 and Halloween parades that end with celebrations at the Sudbrook community park.

Sudbrook Park remains a community where design, nature and good neighbors still enjoy what Frederick Law Olmsted called a “respite for the spirit.”   

Happy 125th birthday, Sudbrook.

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