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Baltimore County Now

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Keyword: parks

National Park Service logoTeri Rising, Historic Preservation Planner
Department of Planning

Fall is a great time to get out and explore Baltimore County’s history.   Why not take some time to visit some of the well known and lesser known places that are a just a small part of the diverse network of sites administered and supported by the National Park Service, an agency of the Department of the Interior, which was established in 1916.  These sites, trails and programs represent various historic themes from the Chesapeake Bay to General George Washington.  Together, they share national significance and provide opportunities for visitors to learn about Baltimore County’s role in our nation’s history.

Baltimore County is home to one of the most interesting  National Park sites  in the region.   Hampton National Historic Site on Hampton Lane just north of Towson is also a partner site on the National Park Service’s National Underground Railroad Network to Freedom Trail.   The park comprises a well preserved collection of structures, including the grand Georgian mansion facing Hampton Lane, that tells the story of the Ridgely family and the people, both free and enslaved, that helped contribute to Baltimore County’s  domestic, agricultural and industrial history.   Tours are available of the buildings and gardens. photo of Hampton Mansion exterior

A number of National Historic Trails are located in Baltimore County for visitors to explore.  The Underground Railroad refers to the effort of enslaved African Americans to gain their freedom by escaping bondage.  The Network to Freedom National Historic Trail was established as part of the National Park Service to expand and support local efforts to coordinate education and preservation of sites that demonstrate the significance of the Underground Railroad not only in the eradication of slavery, but as a cornerstone of our national civil rights movement.   The privately owned “Gorsuch Tavern” on York Road in Sparks joins Hampton National Historic Site as part of The Network to Freedom National Historic Trail.  The tavern is connected to the trail by the theme of slaves, escape from slavery, and the effort of the owner to recapture his slaves by force, resulting in a celebrated  trial that inflamed the tensions already existing between north and south after the compromise of 1850.

Known as “The Route to Victory”, the Washington-Rochambeau National Historic Trail runs from Rhode Island to Virginia.  It traces the route of American and French troops, led by General Washington and General Rochambeau who united against the British Army during the Yorktown Campaign.   The route follows the historic Philadelphia Road in Baltimore County,  which was one of the original post roads in the area and an important route for travelers in the 18th and 19th centuries.   

Chesapeake Bay Gateways and Watertrails Network  is a collection of National Historic Trails and partner sites that help visitors learn about the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries and how they influenced where and how people lived in its watershed.   The Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail, the first National Historic Water Trail, lets visitors experience and learn about the Chesapeake Bay through the routes and places associated with Smith’s explorations.  In Baltimore County, the trail includes the Gunpowder Falls State Park.  

Star Spangled historic trail logoAlso part of the Chesapeake Bay Gateways and Watertrails Network, the Star Spangled Banner National Historic Trail is a 560-mile land and water route that tells the story of the War of 1812 in the Chesapeake Bay region.   It connects historic sites in Maryland, Virginia, and the District of Columbia and commemorates the events leading up to the Battle for Baltimore, which inspired Francis Scott Key to write our National Anthem.  The trail includes several sites in Baltimore County including Todd’s Inheritance, Fort Howard Park, and  Battle Acre Park.  The Chesapeake Explorer App is a great tool which can help assist visitors with their exploration of these important places. 

The Star Spangled Banner National Historic Trail is also part of the Baltimore National Heritage Area, a collection of places in the Baltimore region that form a cohesive, nationally important landscape.   Led by the Baltimore Heritage Area Association, this national heritage area is dedicated to educating visitors about the people and places that helped make Baltimore such an important American city.  

photo of CHarles StreetAnother important component of the Baltimore National Heritage Area is the Charles Street National Scenic Byway, which is one of only four National Scenic Byways located in an urban area.  The byway follows Charles Street north from Baltimore City into Baltimore County where it features wooded natural beauty and several important historic sites like the Sheppard Pratt Gatehouse, one of only two National Historic Landmarks in Baltimore County.   Following the byway to its northern end will lead visitors to the Lutherville National Historic District, a village founded in 1852 by Lutheran ministers that is known for its excellent collection of Victorian homes. 


photo of kids running in fieldJustin Tucker
Intern, Baltimore County Communications Office

As I continue to make the transition into adulthood, I often find myself taking trips down memory lane. I recall racing home from school and flying through my homework so that I could get outside to a game of touch football or pick-up basketball with the other neighborhood kids.  Before we knew it the sun would vanish and we’d all be heading in, ready to do it all over again the next day.  Those were the good days, as many older adults might say.

But it seems as though today’s youth has a different idea of what makes a day good. Hours upon hours of fast-moving images on a screen with accompanying sound effects have replaced carefree outdoor play. It’s hard to believe that the average American child today spends only four to seven minutes per day in unstructured outdoor play, according to the National Wildlife Federation and their “Be Out There” initiative. While it may appear to be cool to spend hundreds of dollars on and obsess over the latest gadgets, the real expense is our nation’s declining health.

According to the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, more than a third of children and adolescents were overweight or obese in 2012. The fact is, the lack of outdoor physical activity decreases physical fitness levels, increases the frequency of ADHD, and increases stress levels in children. The National Wildlife Federation notes some surprising benefits to outdoor play which include:

·         Healthier bodies with increased levels of Vitamin D, which helps to fight off serious health issues such as heart disease and diabetes.

·         Improved distance vision and reduced chance of nearsightedness.

·         Improved performance on standardized tests and critical thinking skills.

·         Stress levels have been shown to drop within minutes of “green time,” and free play with others helps with emotional development and lessens the chances of children developing symptoms of anxiety and depression.

If you ask me, it sounds like a pretty simple solution to such a growing problem. Encouraging kids to go out and play in the fresh air creates fun childhood memories while helping to build the body, spirit and mind.

It’s easy. You can start your kids on the right path by finding a park or playground or walking trail near you.


Jordan Fish
Baltimore County Tourism & Promotion

Whether you prefer classical in the park, folk along your local main street, some smooth jazz at a winery or vineyard, or rockin’ riffs at a raucous festival; there is something for everyone in Baltimore County with more than 150 concerts taking place this summer. Best of all, many of them are free and kid-friendly, so there is no need shell out for the babysitter.

With so much going on there is no excuse to spend a weekend evening at home watching Netflix (the new episodes of Orange is the New Black will still be there when you get home). Those winter doldrums will be back around before you know it, and you’ll be glad you spent your summer afternoons and evenings with some great music!

Here is a complete list of outdoor music and dance concerts throughout the summer.




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