Baltimore County Now
Print this page.
Baltimore County Now - News You Can Use

Baltimore County Now

Stay informed of what's happening in Baltimore County.
Keyword: middle river

Direct Interaction with Residents and Leaders

Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz will host a community forum as part of an ongoing effort to interact directly with Baltimore County residents and community leaders.

The latest "Coffee with Kevin" will be held for communities in the Essex-Middle River area. The Coffee will take place October 7, at the Essex Senior Center, located at 600 Dorsey Avenue, from 10 to 11 a.m. The meeting is open to the public without pre-registration and coffee and donuts will be provided. The County Executive regularly hosts these gatherings in communities all around the beltway. This marks the 9th Coffee with Kevin held over the past two years.

"These meetings have really been great," said Kamenetz. "Our county has so many outstanding communities, and each one of them has an individual character that makes it unique. I learn something every time we meet.”

Increasing Transparency and Responsiveness

These forums are part of Baltimore County's ongoing efforts to increase transparency and responsiveness in government. The County is using social media to communicate directly with the public through Facebook and Twitter, as well as publishing a regular blog, Baltimore County Now, to share current and timely information with citizens. "Social media is increasingly where people go for up to the minute news and information. We encourage everyone to stay connected with County government online and through social media," concluded the County Executive.

photo of Reliable Churchill ribbin-cutting

Rick Johnson, Business Development Representative, Baltimore County Department of Economic and Workforce Development

It’s sometimes hard to say why a certain area seems to suddenly become hot for new business activity. In the case of White Marsh and Middle River, the attraction is clear: availability of industrially-zoned land, easy access to Interstate 95, Rte. 43, and Pulaski Highway, and opportunities to find or construct the perfect building that not only meets a company’s needs today, but allows room to grow.

The past few months have seen big momentum for these eastern Baltimore County business communities.  Here’s a snapshot of what’s new and what’s on the horizon in White Marsh Middle River.

Bottling Group, LLC, a division of PepsiCo, Inc. inked a lease for 25,400 square feet in a new 60,000 square foot warehouse and distribution facility under construction in the White Marsh Business Park. By mid-2015, you can expect trucks to start moving products such as Pepsi, 7-Up and Gatorade out of the new facility and onto the interstate.  With high demand for warehouse distribution space, there’s room to double the warehouse space at this transportation-advantage site.

After searching for more than five years, Reliable Churchill, the state’s largest spirits distributor, opened a new 449,000-square-foot office-warehouse complex off Tangier Drive in the Crossroads @95 complex.  Kevin Dunn, Reliable Churchill's CEO, said that "the building and the location are a perfect match. Our new office and warehouse operation is just minutes from I-95 and gives us the space we need to grow and be more efficient. The move to Baltimore County has allowed us to continue deliveries to our customers throughout the region without interruption."  More than 500 workers made the move with Reliable Churchill from Anne Arundel County to Middle River.

Vac Pac, a family-owned custom food packaging manufacturer, has moved to Middle River, purchasing a 46,000 square foot building on Middle River Road.  Vac Pac designs, prints and manufactures specialized bags and pouches for bakery, poultry, meat, seafood, and industrial applications. Founded in 1949, Vac Pac is a leader in high temperature packaging, holding patents for bag design and enjoys a close partnership with Reynolds Industrial Films. Vac Pac exports finished products around the world through partnerships in Australia, Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Korea, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom. “We are looking forward to a vast increase in operational efficiency, and the excellent location will help us serve our local, national, and global customers more effectively, said Matt Tary, President of Vac Pac. “This facility will serve as our center piece for continued expansion and development into new products and new markets. We are also incredibly grateful for the continued support of Baltimore County. Our whole team is excited and looking forward to the move.” 

What’s ahead.

Cheseapeake Real Estate Group has two buildings under construction along Route 43 in the Crossroads @95 business park. A 435,000 square foot Class A building on Tangier Drive will feature ample car and trailer parking. A 100,685 square foot warehouse and distribution building at 11501 Pocomoke Court is expected to be completed in the first quarter of 2015.  Carpet Consultants, a provider of residential and commercial flooring products, has signed a lease for approximately 18,000 square feet of space.  The company, which markets a full range of products including carpeting, hardwood, laminate, tile and stone, intends to relocate its entire operation to the new building.      

St. John Properties Inc. is nearing completion of a 51,000 SF Class A flex building at 11630 Crossroads Circle. The location is scheduled for occupancy by March, 2015.  St. John anticipates breaking ground on two more office and flex buildings in 2015.

“The business mo” just keeps moving forward. 

historic image of seaplaneDebi Wynn, Director of Education
Glenn L. Martin Maryland Aviation Museum

An airplane flying overhead usually goes without notice these days.  The “wow” factor of man in flight was far different decades ago. Baltimore County’s aviation and space history starts in 1910, and includes appearances by Amelia Earhart, Charles Lindbergh, Glenn L. Martin, and astronaut Tom Jones.

Decades ago, airfields dotted the Baltimore County countryside with runways for recreational use. Air shows provided inspiration for younger attendees and awe for older folks. Traveling on a passenger plane in the 1950s and 60s was a major event, with folks dressing up to board their flight, even as Americans wondered which country would win the “space race.” 

Seeing his first airplane in 1910

One of Baltimore County’s earliest aviation ventures was in a Halethorpe field in 1910, a time when most folks had never seen an airplane fly. Here, the Aero Club of Maryland held one of the first international air competitions in the United States, with $50,000 in prize money attracting pilots from all over the world for competitions of speed, altitude, endurance, bomb dropping, and cross country.  Thirteen year old Baltimorean Henry Rinn attended. Rinn looked back years later to share his recollections. “It was really overwhelming to me. I can’t quite explain my reaction to seeing these planes go down the runway and up into the air.” One of the flights with pilot Hubert Latham took off from Halethorpe field and flew across the city.

Earhart and Lindbergh touch down in Dundalk

Famed pilots Amelia Earhart and Charles Lindbergh landed at Dundalk Flying Field, Baltimore’s first major airfield. In the 1920’s, Dundalk Flying Field was the site of an air show sponsored by the American Flying Club. The site was renamed Logan Field to honor Pilot Lt. Patrick Logan, who suffered fatal injuries during a flight at the air show. The Maryland National Guard’s first flying unit was stationed at Logan, air mail service for Baltimore began at the field, and Baltimore’s first scheduled passenger flights took off here in 1930.

The airfield that launched a NASA career

While the Halethorpe, Woodlawn, Pikesville, Dundalk and Perry Hall air fields are long forgotten landings and take offs, one 20th century small airfield remains.  In 1943, what is now called Essex Skypark was built in Back River, serving at one time as the only U.S. civilian base for seaplanes.

photo of Astronaut Tom JonesNow-retired astronaut and Baltimore County native Tom Jones took his first flight from Essex Skypark, launching a career that took him on four space shuttle missions, including three spacewalks. 

Thanks to a 99-year lease with Baltimore County, the Essex Skypark Association continues operation and management of the general aviation airport, offering special events that introduce new generations to flying. 

More local airfield snapshots

Perry Hall/White Marsh residents may not realize that land once used for flying is now housing and commercial development.  Quinn Airport, built in the 1960s was a 60 acre general aviation airport on Forge Hill Road that operated as Baltimore Airpark until 2001.

In 1925, Bay Shore Park was the location for the Schneider Trophy Race, an international hydroplane contest won by U.S. Army Lt. James H. Doolittle.

In Woodlawn, Oliver Rutherford offered airplane rides and pilot training from his Rutherford Field starting in 1929. The site continued as a general aviation airfield until 1965. Pikesville was the location of Service Field, a 46 acre commercial airport from 1931 to 1935. 

Baltimore Municipal Airport’s first flights in 1938 were from a seaplane ramp, where Martin and Boeing Clippers offered flights to and from Europe and Bermuda. As Harbor Field, the airport shared city and county boundaries and was served by three airlines. With the opening of Friendship Airport in the 1950s, Harbor Field lost its commercial airline traffic, but continued operation as a general aviation airport and Air Guard base until 1960.

Onward and upward

From the 1910 air show to today, over 110 years of flying feats throughout Baltimore County have amazed young and old, from Henry Rimm’s memories of seeing his first airplane to future-astronaut Tom Jones’s first flight at Essex Skypark to young visitors being mesmerized as they get into a pilot’s seat on Open Cockpit Day at the Glenn L. Martin Maryland Aviation Museum.

The thrill of flight can inspire the next generation of Baltimore County pilots and the next inventive minds who, like Glenn L. Martin, will design the future of aviation. With the tools and resources available to today’s pilots and engineers, this next century should unveil incredibly exciting adventures in flight.

The Glenn L. Martin Maryland Aviation Museum shares Martin and Maryland aviation stories with visitors of all ages.  The museum is located at Martin State Airport, with historic aircraft on view nearby at Strawberry Point. 

(References: Maryland Aloft, Essex Skypark Association, Glenn L. Martin Maryland Aviation Museum)

Was This Page Helpful?
Fields marked with * are required.
Page Rating*