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Baltimore County News

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Keyword: land preservation

Pavilion will host nature programs and events

Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz led a festive ribbon-cutting this morning of a new $190,000 nature pavilion designed to expand recreation and nature programming at the Oregon Ridge Nature Center in Cockeysville.

“This is truly one of our premier parks and the staff and nature council do a fantastic job, so, we are delighted to provide this expansive new nature pavilion that will be used for a great variety of events and nature programs,” Kamenetz said.

The Oregon Ridge Nature Center Council contributed $10,000 toward the construction of the pavilion and Bill Kidd's Toyota Volvo $40,000, with Baltimore County funding the remaining $140,000 of the cost of the Kidd's Nature Pavilion.

Oregon Ridge Park – picturesque and popular

Oregon Ridge is not only beautiful, it one of the County’s most popular parks with 330,000 people vising the park every year. They come to enjoy  the six miles of hiking trails, pavilions, outdoor sports, concerts, and the many nature and environmental programs put on by the Oregon Ridge Nature Council and County staff. Programs include animal encounters, summer camps, school field trips, scouts programs, Master Naturalist trainings and more. Last February’s Maple Sugar Weekends and the annual Pancake Breakfast brought in more than 8,000 visitors and the Honey Harvest coming up this October is expected to have attract 5,000 festival-goers.

Kamenetz increases land preservation to 90% of Oregon Ridge Park

On August 15, Kamenetz announced approval of an agreement with Land Preservation Trust places preservation protections on 450 acres of the County's Oregon Ridge Park in Cockeysville, bringing to 90% the total park acreage preserved so that it cannot be commercially or residentially developed. 

Baltimore County has aggressively promoted land preservation for decades, including placement of two-thirds of the County's geography in a rural zone, such that 80% of the County's population live on 30% of the land mass. Across all of its preservation programs, Baltimore County has preserved more than 63,000 acres of land from future development, ranking it in the top 10 counties nationally.


Action protects park from threat of future development

One of many beautiful trails at Oregon Ridge ParkBaltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz approved an agreement that will place preservation protections on 450 acres of the County's Oregon Ridge Park in Hunt Valley. The popular and scenic 1,100 acre park, a portion first acquired by the County in 1969, provides recreational and social activities, including nature education, winter sports, summer concerts, theater, children's playgrounds, as well as a venue for festivals, gatherings and meetings year-round.

Working in close cooperation with Charles Fenwick, Jr. and Michael Hankin on behalf of the Land Preservation Trust, Baltimore County agreed to place land restrictions that will preserve almost 90% of the total acreage to ensure the park cannot be commercially or residentially developed. 

"While there are no plans from the current administration to develop the site, our actions today will ensure that future generations of County residents will be able to enjoy the bucolic charm of Oregon Ridge Park," said Kamenetz. "I am grateful for the guidance of the Land Preservation Trust, a nationally recognized leader of the County's preservation efforts.”

Baltimore County has aggressively promoted land preservation for decades, including placement of two-thirds of the County's geography in a rural zone, such that 80% of the County's population live on 30% of the land mass. Baltimore County is comprised of 610 square miles, with a population exceeding 823,000. Across all of its preservation programs, Baltimore County has preserved more than 63,000 acres of land from future development, ranking it in the top 10 counties nationally.

“The Land Preservation Trust and the surrounding community have long sought to protect Oregon Ridge Park from future development potential,” said Charles Fenwick, Jr. “We appreciate that County Executive Kamenetz recognized how important Oregon Ridge is as a gateway to the valleys, and has agreed to protections that are tremendous and meaningful,” he said.  

Kamenetz will direct that restrictive covenants be recorded with the Land Records of Baltimore County to provide the legal protections in perpetuity. Approximately 330,000 people visit Oregon Ridge Park and Nature Center annually.


Land Preservation Commitment is State and National Model

County Executive Kevin Kamenetz announced today that the County’s land preservation program has been recognized for its achievements and recertified for three years, allowing the County to retain the lion’s share of local agricultural land transfer fees to invest in land preservation.

The State Rural Legacy Program has also awarded funding to two Baltimore County land trusts and Maryland Agricultural Land Preservation Foundation made easement offers to seven Baltimore County farms.

"Preserving rural land in Baltimore County continues to provide many benefits to the citizens of the County. From maintaining a source of local food, to preserving forests that enhance the water quality of our drinking water reservoirs, to reducing the cost of sprawl, Baltimore County remains a national leader in land preservation,” said Kamenetz.

Under Kamenetz, County Has Invested $9.7 Million, Preserved Nearly 5,000 Acres

The State recognized the success of the County’s land preservation strategy that combines restrictive zoning with a growth boundary and acquisition of easements. Since entering office, County Executive Kamenetz has maintained his commitment to land preservation with a total of 4,867 acres preserved in the past five years moving the County closer to its goal of 80,000 acres. For the past five years the County has preserved almost six acres for each acre converted to development.

In approving the County’s request for recertification, the Maryland Department of Planning recognized that even though it is the third most populous jurisdiction in Maryland, Baltimore County has set aside more than 135,000 acres – one third of the County – for agriculture, forestry and open space. Baltimore County has placed 62,828 acres under easement and is ranked first among counties for Maryland Environmental Trust donated easements, third for Rural Legacy and fourth for agricultural easements.

Only 2 Percent of Permit Requests in Protected Agricultural Areas Approved

Over the reporting period, Fiscal Year 2012 to 2014, the County approved only 2 percent of all new permits within the 135,000 acres designated as Agricultural Preservation Area. It retained its protective agricultural zoning and committed $9.7 million of county funds for land preservation during this period.

Carol West, Executive Director of Maryland Agricultural Land Preservation Foundation praised the County’s work saying, “The MALPF Board of Trustees and the Maryland Department of Planning were pleased to recertify Baltimore County for another three years. Recertification allows the County to retain more of their agricultural transfer taxes to be used for preservation in any of the many active programs within the County. They continue to demonstrate their commitment to the preservation of farmland and support of farmers in the County. They have committed more funds for the current acquisition than any other county.”  

“I am very pleased that the County is partnering with the State to preserve farmland and open space — one of the best ways to protect our water quality,” said County Council Chair Cathy Bevins.

$3.8 Million in State Funding For Preservation of 1,000 Acres

Subject to Board of Public Works approval, the State Rural Legacy Program has awarded $1.1 million to two Baltimore County Land Trusts. These awards were out of a total of $10 million statewide, for which there were 26 applications. These land trusts will seek to preserve land as soon as the funding receives final approval. The Maryland Agricultural Land Preservation Foundation Board of Trustees approved an allocation of $2.63 million in state funds, and, with $1.3 million in County matching funds, they made offers to seven farms, subject to Board of Public Works and County Council approvals. Preservation from these two programs is expected to protect 1,000 acres of rural land in the County.

"We greatly appreciate the continued support by the State, County Executive and County Council for farmers seeking to permanently preserve their farmland," said Gail Ensor, Chairperson of the Baltimore County Agricultural Land Preservation Advisory Board. "Farming, and the many agriculture related industries, are an important part of the County's economy as well as a key component of the rural landscape.”

Land Preservation Has Moved to Promote Better Coordination

The County’s Land Preservation function has recently been relocated to the Department of Planning. This has created the opportunity to better integrate land preservation with land use planning. It has also provided the opportunity to make its programs more consistent with the County’s Historic Preservation program, which is also housed in Planning. “We are pleased to have the land preservation program in Planning where we can integrate many of its functions into rural planning. We are especially pleased to work with the dedicated Agricultural Land Preservation Advisory Board,” said Planning Director Andrea Van Arsdale.

Find Out How to Preserve Your Rural Land

Information is available on applying to donate or sell an easement.


 
 

Revised September 26, 2016