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Keyword: kamenetz

By Kevin Kamenetz, Baltimore County Executive

For 90 days in Annapolis, we fought hard, testified at hearings, and made our case for Baltimore County. We secured a total of $942 million in State funding for education, health, public safety, transportation, school construction, road and infrastructure projects in our County. We fought for new laws to protect victims of sexual assault, combat skyrocketing drug prices, overhaul the cash bail system, grow our craft brewing industry, and protect the Bay by extending Maryland’s fracking ban. With strong support and advocacy from Baltimore County’s State delegates and senators, we brought it home from Annapolis.

State funding for County priorities

Baltimore County secured $841 million in State aid for education, libraries, the Community College of Baltimore County, health, public safety, recreation and open space. 

Why it matters  As Maryland’s third largest jurisdiction with a growing population, Baltimore County residents deserve their fair share of State funding. State and County funds protect and improve our quality of life, from 21st century libraries and community college to parks and open space for our neighborhoods. 

State funding for school construction

Secured $48.3 million in State matching funds toward public school construction. 

Why it matters  The County’s $1.3 billion Schools for Our Future school construction program will eliminate overcrowding, modernize facilities and add air conditioning. The ten-year initiative, the largest single school construction program in Maryland, is building 16 new schools, 12 additions, and 7 major renovations.

Easing traffic congestion to support job growth

Delivered $50 million in State funding for transportation projects in Owings Mills, Sparrows Point, White Marsh and around the beltway.  

Why it matters  Most of the Baltimore beltway is in Baltimore County. Funding beltway widening is critical to ease traffic congestion, especially during commuter rush hours. Other projects in key employment areas include the Dolfield Avenue interchange on I-795, widening Philadelphia Road from Mohrs Lane to Campbell Boulevard, and bus routes and bridge repair at Sparrows Point.

Supporting local breweries

Maryland craft brewers can now sell more beer at their production taprooms. 

Why it matters The new law opens opportunities for Baltimore County brewers Heavy Seas, Key Brewing, Du Claw and White Marsh Brewing Company. Coming soon: a new $50 million Guinness innovation brewery in Relay, bringing 70 jobs and a major tourist attraction for Baltimore County.

Combating high drug prices

The County supported a new law that allows the Maryland attorney general to sue drug companies when prices of generic drugs soar dramatically.

Why it matters We all pay when drug companies drive up their prices. Baltimore County insures thousands of local government workers.

Protect victims of sexual assault

“No means no.” We fought for a law that simplifies the definition of rape and sexual assault. Police departments now must store rape kits for 20 years.

Why it matters This new law puts the focus on the actions of the person accused of assault, not the victim, and preserves evidence for police and prosecutors during investigations. 

Overhauling the cash bail system

Supported a new State law that overhauls the cash-based bail system for defendants awaiting trial. 

Why it matters Defendants should not be penalized just because they can’t afford cash bail. The issues for a judge should be whether the defendant is a threat to the community and can be relied on to return to court.

Baltimore County does not operate in a vacuum. Policy and funding decisions at the State level have direct and often lasting impact on everyone living and working here. We will continue to fight for the resources that Baltimore County residents need and deserve. 

Protecting the Chesapeake

Supported extension of Maryland’s fracking ban.   

Why it matters Protecting the Chesapeake Bay and our water supply is fundamental.   

Baltimore County does not operate in a vacuum. Policy and funding decisions at the State level have direct and often lasting impact on everyone living and working here. We will continue to fight for the resources that Baltimore County residents need and deserve. 


Annual Award Honoring African-American Heritage in Baltimore County Presented to Three Distinguished Recipients

Today, at the Owings Mills Library with Louis Diggs in attendance, Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz announced the 2017 recipients of The Louis S. Diggs Award—a recognition event that takes place annually during Black History Month. This award is presented to individuals whose life work represents a commitment to the celebration of the African-American experience in Baltimore County, and whose efforts inspire others to strive for success and to celebrate the diversity and achievement that is our strength.

The 2017 Awardees are:

Dr. Freeman Hrabowski, President, University of Maryland Baltimore County
Serving as President of UMBC since 1992, Dr. Hrabowski’s research and publications focus on science and math education, with special emphasis on minority participation and performance. He was named by President Obama to chair the President’s Advisory Commission on Educational Excellence for African Americans. Named one of the 100 Most Influential People in the World by TIME (2012) and one of America’s Best Leaders by U.S. News and World Report (2008), Dr. Hrabowski has been touted as one of America’s top leaders by numerous national and worldwide publications, institutions, and foundations.

Dr. Dallas Dance, Superintendent, Baltimore County Public Schools
Distinguished as a visionary leader, Superintendent Dance has united BCPS into a powerful force committed to producing globally competitive graduates. Since 2012, Dr. Dance has been responsible for overseeing the instruction of 112,000 students in 173 schools, centers and programs in the 25th largest school system in the nation.  Dr. Dance’s leadership was recognized with his appointment to President Obama’s Advisory Commission on Educational Excellence for African Americans.

Delegate Adrienne Jones, Speaker Pro Tem, Maryland House of Delegates
Since 1997, Adrienne Jones has been a member of the Maryland House of Delegates for District 10. Delegate Jones is the current Speaker Pro Tem, holding that post since 2003, and the first African-American female to serve in that position in the State of Maryland. Born and educated in Baltimore County, Delegate Jones was employed by County Government before retiring in 2014 where she was the director of the Office of Minority Affairs, the Office of Fair Practices, and the deputy director of Human Resources.

About Louis S. Diggs

The award is named for Baltimore County resident Louis S. Diggs, a respected and distinguished authority on County African-American history. Diggs’ research and historical perspective has guided him to publish 10 books; organize tours in the community; present lectures; and manage the Diggs-Johnson Museum in Granite.

“No one has done more to preserve and promote African-American history in Baltimore County than Mr. Louis Diggs,” stated Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz. “I am immensely proud to present this year’s Diggs award to three very distinguished individuals who embody the true spirit of this honor. Freeman Hrabowski, Dallas Dance, and Adrienne Jones are outstanding leaders who make a difference in our County each and every day.”


Annual Award Honoring African-American Heritage to be Presented to Three Distinguished Recipients

Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz will recognize the 2017 recipients of The Louis S. Diggs Award in a ceremony on February 27, at the Owings Mills branch of the Baltimore County Public Library, starting at 11:30 a.m.

This award, presented annually during Black History Month, is presented to individuals whose life work represents a commitment to the celebration of the African-American experience in Baltimore County, and whose efforts inspire others to strive for success and to celebrate the diversity and achievement that is our strength.

2017 Awardees

The 2017 awardees are:

Dr. Freeman Hrabowski, President, University of Maryland Baltimore County

Serving as President of UMBC since 1992, Dr. Hrabowski’s research and publications focus on science and math education, with special emphasis on minority participation and performance. He was named by President Obama to chair the President’s Advisory Commission on Educational Excellence for African Americans. Named one of the 100 Most Influential People in the World by TIME (2012) and one of America’s Best Leaders by U.S. News and World Report (2008), Dr. Hrabowski has been touted as one of America’s top leaders by numerous national and worldwide publications, institutions, and foundations.

Dr. Dallas Dance, Superintendent, Baltimore County Public Schools

Distinguished as a visionary leader, Superintendent Dance has united BCPS into a powerful force committed to producing globally competitive graduates. Since 2012, Dr. Dance has been responsible for overseeing the instruction of 112,000 students in 173 schools, centers, and programs in the 25th largest school system in the nation.  Dr. Dance’s leadership was recognized with his appointment to President Obama’s Advisory Commission on Educational Excellence for African Americans.

Delegate Adrienne Jones, Speaker Pro Tem, Maryland House of Delegates

Since 1997, Adrienne Jones has been a member of the Maryland House of Delegates for District 10. Delegate Jones is the current Speaker Pro Tem, holding that post since 2003, and the first African-American female to serve in that position in the State of Maryland. Born and educated in Baltimore County, Delegate Jones was employed by County Government before retiring in 2014 where she was the director of the Office of Minority Affairs, the Office of Fair Practices and the deputy director of Human Resources.

Louis S. Diggs

The award is named for Baltimore County resident Louis S. Diggs, a respected and distinguished authority on County African-American history. Diggs’ research and historical perspective has guided him to publish 10 books; organize tours in the community; present lectures; and manage the Diggs-Johnson Museum in Granite.

“No one has done more to preserve and promote African-American history in Baltimore County than Mr. Louis Diggs,” stated Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz. “I am immensely proud to present this year’s Diggs award to three very distinguished individuals who embody the true spirit of this honor. Freeman Hrabowski, Dallas Dance, and Adrienne Jones are outstanding leaders who make a difference in our County each and every day.”


 
 
Revised September 26, 2016