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Baltimore County Now

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Keyword: history

photo of a portion of the muralFronda Cohen, Director, Baltimore County Commission on Arts & Sciences

How do you honor a war 200 years after it ended?  Our buildings, museums and parks are filled with monuments, historic markers and remembrances of battles won and battles valiantly fought and lost.  What ties these commemorations together is a desire to honor our soldiers and the families and communities that supported their service.

How do you create a remembrance that speaks to history and also engages people today?

The Baltimore County Commission on Arts & Sciences took on the challenge of finding a way to use public art to honor Baltimore County’s role in the War of 1812.  They saw the battlefield at North Point as the centerpiece.  Here, a crucial military engagement stalled British land forces so American troops could fortify Ft. McHenry and save Baltimore from capture.

Battle Acre Park on North Point Road in Dundalk is an earlier commemoration of that important battle. Today, overlooking a newly renovated park, is new public art mural that captures not only the history and leaders of the battle, but the fighting spirit of its citizen soldiers and the pride residents took in their service. 

photo showing entire mural

The “Home of the Brave” mural features the battle engagement, with American troops holding formation, blocking British troops from advancing.  This panel is flanked by portraits of the battle’s military leaders, U.S. General John Stricker and British General Robert Ross.  Another panel highlights the historic Todd’s Inheritance homestead, showing rural life in eastern Baltimore County during the early 1800s.  A final scene shows a celebration ceremony held in 1839, just 25 years after the Battle of North Point was waged on the site.

After the fireworks are over, the “Home of the Brave” mural will remain to remind us of the bravery and commitment of America’s citizen soldiers.  Visit Baltimore County’s Battle Acre Park and remember a legacy of service that lives on today.  

The “Home of the Brave” mural was designed and painted by artist Marshall Adams and is a project of the Baltimore County Commission on Arts & Sciences in partnership with the Dundalk Renaissance Corporation.  Funding was provided through grants from The Citizens of Baltimore County and the Maryland State Arts Council.


photo of a Victorian home in Sudbrook ParkFronda Cohen, Baltimore County Office of Communications

When we moved to Sudbrook Park in 1988, we had never heard the word “curvilinear.” After many walks through this historic community in Pikesville, we soon learned about the pleasures of curving, winding roads and the history of a neighborhood that in 1889 became an experiment in suburban community design.

Frederick Law Olmsted, Sr., the father of landscape architecture in America, is perhaps best known as co-designer of New York City’s Central Park. His “experiment” in Baltimore County was based on the idea that a suburban village would be an attractive alternative to the densely populated city. 

Olmsted designed Sudbrook with a distinct entranceway, a narrow bridge that led to open green spaces for community gatherings, spacious lots for Victorian cottages, and smaller lots for more affordable homes. The setting was green, with mature trees lining winding roads that encouraged walking, enjoying nature, and meeting neighbors along the way.

Olmsted’s gateway bridge at the entrance to Sudbrook Park still spans the rail line, although 125 years later it is the Metro that shares the tracks with the railroad that once took residents downtown to work. On any given day, you’ll find walkers, runners, and bicyclists exploring the curvilinear roads.  Victorian homes still grace streets lined with centuries-old oaks. Neat brick colonials built during World War II anchor the smaller lots. Neighbors, kids and dogs in tow, enjoy the annual July 4 and Halloween parades that end with celebrations at the Sudbrook community park.

Sudbrook Park remains a community where design, nature and good neighbors still enjoy what Frederick Law Olmsted called a “respite for the spirit.”   

Happy 125th birthday, Sudbrook.


photo of soldier with gunsmokeJordan Fish
Baltimore County Tourism & Promotion

Celebrate the 200th anniversary of the defense of Baltimore and the writing of our national anthem. Whether you’re a huge history buff, or you’re not entirely sure what year the War of 1812 started, there are great events occurring over the next two weeks in Baltimore County. Make sure you get out to some or all of these unique happenings, and celebrate your patriotism and Maryland pride!

Defenders Day – Battle of North Point

Baltimore County’s Battle of North Point is a prominent part of American history. Marking the battle, the Defenders Day event on September 6 and 7 takes place at Fort Howard Park in Baltimore County on the shores of the Chesapeake Bay. This commemorative event and reenactment “kicks off” Maryland’s Star-Spangled Spectacular week.

The Dundalk Patapsco Neck Historical Society and Baltimore County Tourism and Promotion are pleased to offer free parking and free admission to the event. On Monday, September 8, a fireworks display will be held on the grounds of Sparrows Point High School.

The 200th March of the Defenders

This year is not only the 200th anniversary of the Star-Spangled Banner and the Battles of North Point and Baltimore; it is also the 200th anniversary of the 1-175th Infantry Regiment of the Maryland National Guard (MDNG).

Commemorating the occasion, 500 uniformed MDNG men and women will march the 6-mile route that the Maryland Militia marched 200 years ago to defend Baltimore and the nation from the British invasion. On Thursday, September 11, Governor Martin O’Malley and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake will send off the troops from Patterson Park and Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz will greet them at Battle Acre. More details about this event can be found on the Star-Spangled 200 website  {Web page may take a minute to load.}

The Star-Spangled Festival at Martin State Airport

Martin State Airport is opening its doors for two full days of festivities from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. The Festival offers local Maryland foods and crafts, Blue Angels souvenirs, music, the Glenn L. Martin Aviation Museum, and static aircraft displays. History booths and demos tell the story of the U.S. Navy, aviation, and the War of 1812. Parking is free with shuttles running from parking areas to the festival all day.

Please Note: The Blue Angels’ air show will NOT be seen at the Martin State Airport Festival – the show will be performed over Fort McHenry in Baltimore City. Visitors to the Festival at Martin State can see the Blue Angels take-off (approximately 1:30 p.m.) and land (approximately 4 p.m.) only. Please also review the bag and security policies before arriving at the Festival. {Web page may take a minute to load.}


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