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Baltimore County Now

Stay informed of what's happening in Baltimore County.
Keyword: health department

October Show Highlights Applying for Healthcare, Police Body Cameras and More

The October edition of Baltimore County’s half-hour cable television public affairs show, “Hello Baltimore County,” highlights the following topics:

  • Applying for Health Coverage – Find out how Baltimore County Health and Human Services can help you access health coverage for your family.
  • Body Worn Cameras – Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz and Police Chief Jim Johnson discuss their decision outfit officers with body worn cameras.
  • Diplomas to Degrees – BCPS Superintendent Dr. Dallas Dance and CCBC President Dr. Sandra Kurtinitis share the many programs for high school students to earn college credits.

View streaming video of the Hello Baltimore County shows.

In addition to online access, the program runs several times per week on Cable Channel 25, in Baltimore County, at the following times:

  • Mondays: 1:30 p.m., 6 p.m.
  • Tuesdays: 12 p.m., 9 p.m.
  • Wednesdays: 11 a.m., 4 p.m., 10 p.m.
  • Thursdays: 1 p.m., 8 p.m.
  • Fridays: 11 a.m., 6 p.m.
  • Saturdays: 10 a.m., 3 p.m., 7 p.m.
  • Sundays: 10 a.m., 3 p.m., 7 p.m.

Vaccines are Only $8 Each for Dogs, Cats and Ferrets

Keep your pet and your family safe this fall by taking advantage of Baltimore County Department of Health’s low-cost rabies vaccination clinics. The outdoor clinics are scheduled from now through October 31 at seven sites. Vaccinations protect domestic animals and humans from rabies, which is a potentially fatal disease.

Vaccinations are $8 and available to cats, dogs and ferrets. The clinics will be held rain or shine. Animals receiving rabies shots must be at least 12 weeks old. All animals must be on leashes or in carriers. Due to time constraints, safety and escape risk, uncontrollable animals will not be vaccinated during the clinics. Aggressive dogs must be muzzled. All cats must be contained in a properly sized, escape-proof carrier. Exact change is appreciated, as cash and checks will be the only forms of payment accepted.

Rabies Precautions

Baltimore County law requires pets to be licensed and for rabies vaccinations to be kept up-to-date. Other precautions against rabies include obeying leash laws and avoiding contact with wild animals or unknown domestic animals. If your pet has had contact with a wild animal, notify your veterinarian. Additionally, if you have been bitten or scratched by an animal, seek medical attention.

Bite and scratch exposures from any animal to a human or pet exposure to wildlife are also reportable to the local Health Department, Police Department or Animal Control authority. For additional information on how to protect your pet against rabies, contact Baltimore County Animal Services at 410-887-PAWS (7297).

Health Experts Offer Prevention Tips

The Baltimore County Department of Health is announcing its first confirmed case of West Nile Virus (WNV) this year. The infected individual died on Monday, August 24, from causes not related to West Nile Virus.

“West Nile Virus is an unfortunate, yet common disease that we expect to find in Marylanders this time of year," said Dr. Gregory Wm. Branch, Director of the Baltimore County Department of Health and Human Services. "To reduce the risk of getting infected, I encourage residents to W.R.A.P. up."

W.R.A.P. Up

“W.R.A.P. Up” prevention measures are: 

  • Wear long pants, long-sleeved shirts and hats, when concerned about mosquitoes.
  • Repair damaged window screens.
  • Avoid areas of high mosquito activity and unnecessary outdoor activities at dawn and dusk, when mosquitoes are most active.
  • Purchase and use an EPA-registered insect repellent according to package directions.

WNV is a disease that is transmitted through the bite of a mosquito that has picked up the virus by feeding on an infected animal. In humans, WNV generally causes either no symptoms or mild, flu-like illness, but it can also be fatal. Persons older than 60 have the greatest risk of developing severe disease. People with compromised immune systems also may be at high risk of WNV infection.

Monitor Yards and Gardens

Residents are urged to monitor their own yards and gardens for standing water that can serve as a breeding ground for mosquitoes. Small amounts of water in a discarded can or container will support dozens of mosquitoes. To eliminate mosquito-breeding areas: 

  • Clean rain gutters to allow water to flow freely.
  • Empty or screen corrugated drain pipes.  
  • Remove old tires or drill drainage holes in tires used as playground equipment.
  • Turn over wading pools, wheelbarrows, wagons and carts when not in use. Flush water from the bottom of plant holders twice a week.
  • Replace water in birdbaths at least twice a week.
  • Turn garbage can lids upside down and make sure trash receptacles are empty of water.
  • Fix dripping faucets.
  • Aerate ornamental pools and water gardens or stock with fish and use a circulating filter system.

Spray Programs Offered

In an effort to reduce the WNV-infected mosquito population, the Maryland Department of Agriculture (MDA) will spray all communities within a one-mile radius of where the deceased person lived. MDA plans to post the affected communities at

Communities interested in the spray program should send an email to the Environmental Health Services Office at Please note that mosquito control services cannot be provided within a community that has not enrolled in the program.


To learn more about WNV, visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website.

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