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Baltimore County Now - News You Can Use

Baltimore County Now

Stay informed of what's happening in Baltimore County.
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kids doing project in wetlands areMichael L. Schneider, Community Outreach Liaison, Baltimore County Department of Recreation and Parks

This summertime guarantee brought to you exclusively by the Baltimore County Department of Recreation and Parks:

There will be no snow storms, snow flurries or snow squalls at all this summer on any Recreation and Parks sites and parks this summer. Guaranteed!

Wait, there’s more…

We will also guarantee fun and lots of great programs for families, kids and kids of all ages. We are calling this our “Hot times” summer package guarantee!

Here is a sampling of some of the hot times coming your way. Just the names of the programs should be enough to get your attention and participation…

Robert E. Lee Park –Growing up WILD, Beaver Night Hike, The Great American Campout, Natural Play, Bike Rodeo, Mud Day

Cromwell Valley Park – Animal Mothers; Art, Music, Poetry, Food, Wine and Classic Cars; Tin Can Gardening; “Reptiles by Day, Amphibians by Night;” the  annual TALMAR Mother’s Day Plant Sale; Fairy Furniture; and you’re gonna love this one: “Eat Your Weedies” – sounds perfectly delicious! 

Oregon Ridge Park – 4th of July BSO Star Spangled Spectacular/Fireworks

Throughout our County are “Summer Playgrounds” and camps, enthusiastically and well supervised with excitement, entertainment, socializing, and even some learning slipped in with all the fun.  Here are just some of the camps: 

Dragon Tao Karate Camp, Premier Basketball Camp; Boys Lax Camp; Step Up to Lax Camp; Camp Gymtastic; Al Bumbry Baseball Camp; Running Camp; Field Hockey Camp; Soccer Camp; Volleyball Camp; Camp New Horizons; Music, Nature, Drama, Art, Camp Chickadee, Around the Pond Summer Camp, Polar Pals, Grizzly Gang, Imagination Station, Muscular Mustangs, Creativity Camp, Gators Summer Camp, Blast Soccer Camp, camps for children and young adults with special needs. There’s really too much to list here, so, go to the Baltimore County Recreation and Parks homepage  for  a full listing of summer camps and playgrounds.

Keep in mind, that pretty much every one of our 40+ recreation centers offer programming throughout the summer with the above mentioned camps, activities and community events.  Follow this link to our Recreation Councils and recreation offices to learn more about what is going on in your neighborhood.

Of course, there are over 200 small, medium, large and extra large- and all beautiful – parks, sites, waterfronts and fields.  Imagine, so many great places to relax, picnic, exercise and simply to enjoy; many nearby your home.

For those  that might be looking for something to do this summer, not as a participant, but more in line with earning those community service hours, or to have a summer job, there are some options for you, too.  There are still some paying positions at Oregon Ridge Park (410-887-1818) and Rocky Point Park (410-887-2818) on the waterfront. There might still be some summer positions out there at our camps and recreation centers.  Use this link to our Recreation Offices and ask if there is something to suit your skills and the needs of that office. 

There you have it; a special summer guaranteed to be all you need it to be; well supervised, exciting, interesting and fun.  And don’t forget, guaranteed to be snow free – though it may include a “sno-ball” from time to time!


photo of damages treeSaul Passe, Arborist, Baltimore County Bureau of Highways

Wow, that was a rough winter.  I hesitate to put that in the past tense for fear that Mother Nature will throw down snow and ice just to spite me.  As an employee of the Baltimore County Highways I am no stranger to the havoc that snow and ice can do to the roads, but as the Arborist for Highways I can tell you that this winter has also taken its toll on the trees. 

Baltimore County has been recognized by the Arbor Day Foundation as a Tree City USA community.  Many of our urban streets are lined with mature canopy trees, and even more of our rural roads are up against large forests.  Winter events involving snow, and especially ice, can put these trees under extreme pressures that will exceed their normal capabilities to support themselves.  Even if a branch doesn’t reach the point of breaking off, a quarter of an inch layer of ice on any branch is enough to make it bend significantly.  Some of these branches are hanging of the road and can become a problem for motorists, not to mention the branches that do break off and fall in the road. 

Once there are branches snapped off and laying in the road, or bending into the road what is to be done with them?  If tree debris falls from a County tree (a tree in the public right-of way), County forces are responsible for removing them from either the road or the sidewalk.  The Highways Bureau will only take care of the debris that falls into a public right-of-way; anything that comes down on private property is the responsibility of the homeowner.  Any private trees that may fall into a public right-of-way will be cleared out off of the road or sidewalk, but can’t always be taken away by County forces, and remain the responsibility of the homeowner.  The bottom line is that the care of trees along public roads is a shared responsibility.  Baltimore County provides the service of keeping our roads open and free of tree debris, and the homeowner should take care of debris on private property.

As we enter spring we should keep in mind that when leaves come out they can add a lot of weight to trees.  There may be some branches that have taken a beating over the winter and may be further stressed by a “full head of hair.”  Species such as White Pine and Bradford Pear are softer woods that are susceptible to failure under extreme conditions.  So, this spring, take a few minutes to look up into the canopy and take notice of our County trees.  They are a valuable resource for the County that we can take care of together to ensure a green future for generations to come.


photo of woman cupping her earPaul Efros, M.A., CCC-A
Audiologist, Baltimore County Department of Health

Free Hearing Screenings Offered by the Department of Health

Many of us take our hearing for granted, but hearing loss is one of the most preventable and treatable health issues in our nation. According to the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, approximately 28 million Americans have hearing loss and this number has doubled in the past 30 years.

Many Americans with hearing loss tend to be older adults.  But loss of hearing doesn’t need to be an accepted part of getting older. Help is available!  In observance of Better Hearing and Speech Month, the Baltimore County Department of Health’s Audiology Services will offer free hearings checks at three county locations (by appointment only) during the month of May.

How do you know if you or a loved one is losing their hearing? Some signs include:

·         Frequently asking others to repeat themselves

·         Pain or ringing in the ears

·         Difficulty hearing conversations, and

·         Keeping the TV or radio volume so loud, others ask you to lower it.

Loss of hearing isn’t just inconvenient; it’s detrimental to a happy, healthy life.  Hearing loss is often accompanied by symptoms such as: irritability, fatigue, avoidance or withdrawal from social situations, reduced alertness and increased risk of personal safety, and reduced job performance.

So, do yourself a favor, schedule your free hearing screening today!


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