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Baltimore County Now

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Keyword: department of public works

photo of a potholeDale Green
Paving Inspector
Bureau of Highways, Department of Public Works 
   

We’re really getting our share of snow this year with 17 official storms so far, (from Deon to Hercules to Pax to Titan!) – and we got our share of potholes too! The intermittent snow-melt, combined with freezing temperatures, damaged road surfaces and caused traffic headaches across the County. And Baltimore County’s Department of Public Works (Bureau of Highways) has been, is, and will be prepared to tackle the problem. In fact, Crews from eleven highway shops work throughout the year filling potholes. We’ve got equipment operators and laborers always on the lookout for potholes, and they schedule repairs as quickly as possible.

Because of our hard winter 2013 - 2014, (which began with a surprise snow on December 8) the number of potholes is certain to spike this spring. Freezing and thawing (plus a lot of water) is a recipe for road damage, and every winter the Bureau of Highways fills about 50,000 potholes on average. As a rule of thumb, the harder the winter, the more potholes need to be filled.  For instance, during the winter of 2010 (you remember Snowmageddon?), potholes increased almost 20 percent. It probably won’t be that bad this year, but it’s sure to go up. We’ve already booked 7,374 potholes this January and about 7,500 in February.

While the weather is still cold, and there’s still a chance of freezing, crews will fill holes with a cold mix and then return in better weather for a permanent, hot mix fix. The hot mix isn’t usually available from the plant until mid-March although some crews have done a limited amount of milling and patching with the hot mix already.

Potholes are a road’s number one enemy and taking care of potholes is the “default setting” for Baltimore County’s Bureau of Highways. Whenever crews aren’t pushing snow or taking care of downed trees, they’re on the next pothole. So, when you see a pothole, report it. Call 410 887-3560 and be sure to give the location – a street address or a cross street is enough – and we will get it fixed as soon as possible.



photo of young businesswoman on smartphoneCarla Tucker
Office of Budget & Finance, Purchasing Division
Minority & Small Business Marketing Manager

Do you or someone you know own a minority or women-owned company and seek to do business with the County? If so, let me clear up a common misconception about who can bid on potentially lucrative Baltimore County contracts.

When I talk with people about the County’s Minority/Women’s Business Enterprise certification requirements, people often believe that minority-owned and women-owned businesses must be certified in order to bid in County procurements.  Baltimore County's procurements are open to ALL businesses, including MBE/WBE firms.  Certification is NOT required to bid as prime contractor.   

The County advertises its procurement opportunities online at

·         Purchasing Division:  www.baltimorecountymd.gov/purchasing;

·         Department of Public Works Construction Contracts Administration:  www.baltimorecountymd.gov/go/constructioncontracts;

·         Department of Public Works Professional Services:  www.baltimorecountymd.gov/pssc; and

·         eMaryland Marketplace:  https://emaryland.buyspeed.com/bso/.    photo of hard hat and level

Certification is used in the MBE/WBE subcontracting goal process.  In these cases, only MBE/WBE firms certified by Maryland Department of Transportation Office of Minority Business Enterprise (MDOT) or the City of Baltimore’s Minority and Women’s Business Opportunity Office can be counted towards the participation goal. 

Certified and noncertified minority-owned and women-owned businesses bidding as the prime contractor with the County must also meet the subcontracting goal requirement set in the solicitation.  The MBE/WBE subcontracting participation goal is a contractual obligation of the prime contractor, regardless of the prime’s minority/women’s status.    


photo of recycling balerRashida White
Public Information Specialist
 Baltimore County Recycling Division

Baltimore County is celebrating America Recycles Day in a big way this year, with the opening of its new Materials Recovery Facility (MRF) and transfer station in Cockeysville that sorts the tons of materials collected each day through the County’s very successful Single Stream Recycling Program. 

The new single stream facility will definitely impress visitors as tons of recyclables travel on numerous conveyor belts and are sorted multiple ways, including the use of optical sorters that shoot blasts of air to separate bottles and cans from paper. The highly automated equipment will allow the new MRF to process 35 tons of recyclables per hour, with the capacity to sort more than 70,000 tons of recyclables per year.

Our new MRF is not just impressive to look at, but it will also allow the County to hold on to the full economic benefits of high value recyclables collected from residents. Collectively, the new transfer station and single stream MRF are expected to generate approximately $750,000 to $2 million per year revenue after expenses, depending on market conditions.

The opening is just in time to celebrate America Recycles Day, a national campaign to educate and encourage individuals to recycle.  What better way to participate and show that Baltimore County recycles, than to make sure that you are recycling all that you can!


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