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Keyword: department of planning

@CleanGreenBaltCo is a “one-stop shop” for news and information on County programs and services that support sustainable living

Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz announced the launch of a new Facebook page promoting the County’s commitment to making our communities more sustainable. Clean Green Baltimore County serves as a resource for residents seeking to become better environmental stewards while also highlighting environmentally-friendly achievements throughout the county.

“We have such a good story to tell in terms of Baltimore County’s commitment to restoring streams and waterways, anti-litter programs, recycling, forest sustainability, land preservation and more,” said Kamenetz. “I’m excited about this new platform highlighting the work our dedicated employees do every day to protect the environment. The page is also a great resource for residents and businesses, featuring tangible steps to help people reduce their environmental impact. Please consider sharing the Clean Green Baltimore County page with your family members, friends and Facebook followers. We look forward to connecting with you!”

Clean Green Baltimore County posts useful information and resources related to various Baltimore County agencies, including, but not limited to:

  • Department of Environmental Protection & Sustainability
  • Department of Permits, Approvals & Inspections
  • Department of Planning
  • Department of Public Works
  • Department of Recreation & Parks
  • Office of Budget & Finance, Property Management Division, Energy Management & Sustainability Section

Visit facebook.com/CleanGreenBaltCo and “like” the page to see tips and strategies to help you “go green,” as well as sustainable success stories from around the County and noteworthy environmental initiatives from across the globe. Sign up for Facebook notifications from @CleanGreenBaltCo to stay up-to-date on our continued pursuit toward a cleaner, greener Baltimore County.


By Teri Rising, Baltimore County Department of Planning 

Many well-known place names have unusual origins that are often as unique as the places they represent. Place names come from early settlers and businesses, literature, mythology, and land patents. Early settlers and their businesses often led to their name and the town being put on the map, literally.  

Timonium and the Bard

Timonium originates from an 18th century mansion that was demolished in the 1970s to make way for a fairground expansion. Timonium is derived from the central character of “Timon of Athens,” a play attributed in part to William Shakespeare, and signifies a place of sorrows or solitude.  

Oella: An Incan goddess spins cotton

The textile mill community known as Oella was named after the patent given to the accumulated lands of the Union Manufacturing Co. in 1811. Oella is a spelling variation of Mama Ocllo, a goddess from Inca and Peruvian mythology. The legend of Mama Ocllo and Manco Capac is a traditional story that tells how the Incan culture developed. Mama Ocllo or Mama Oella was said to have taught Incan women domestic arts skills, including how to spin thread. A resurvey document for the tract stated that the name came from "Oella, in honor of the first woman to apply herself to the spinning of cotton on the continent of North America."

Bellona, Sister of Mars

Bellona Avenue takes its name from the Bellona Powder Mill, which was established around 1801. The mill was drowned by Lake Roland in 1861. Bellona was a Roman goddess of war and sister to Mars.

You own it, you name it

There are place names taken from 18th and 19th century land records and their owners. Bowley’s Quarters was named after Daniel Bowley who had a farm in that location in the 1750s and a residence in Baltimore City.  The quarters name was given to an additional farm owned by a planter who lived elsewhere.   

The Caves Valley area was named for the land tract "Coale's Caves" that was surveyed for John Coale in 1705.

The name of White Marsh was used in a 1714 land survey and also was the name of a Ridgely family estate and furnace established by the Nottingham Company around 1753. 

 

Regardless of their origin stories, each one of these names represents a special place in Baltimore County’s past and present.  

To learn more about other Baltimore County names and places, check out the Baltimore County Department of Planning and the Baltimore County Public Library

Photo Sources: Taylor, Robert. Map of the city and county of Baltimore, Maryland. Baltimore, 1857, Library of Congress; Ancestry.com. U.S., Indexed County Land Ownership Maps, 1860-1918; Baltimore County Public Library. 


Public hearing and information session set for December 13

Baltimore County invites non-profit organizations, government agencies and the general public to a meeting to discuss upcoming funding opportunities and spending priorities for housing and community development programs. The meeting, to be led by the Department of Planning, will be held at 10 a.m. on Tuesday, December 13 in the basement (Genesis Hall) of St. Pius Church, 6428 York Road, Baltimore, MD, 21212. 

Citizens and organizations will be asked to express their views on needs and spending priorities related to housing and community development for the coming fiscal year, 2018, during a public hearing that will begin at 10 a.m. Following the public hearing, County staff will discuss the process through which organizations may apply for grant funding. The bulk of the funding to be discussed is made available by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), which allocates funding annually to Baltimore County. HUD funds include Community Development Block Grants and Emergency Solutions Grants. Additional support comes from state and County funding. The County disburses much of this funding through a competitive grant program administered by the Department of Planning.

County staff will also invite interested citizens to learn about and consider joining the Homeless Roundtable, the County's advisory group that helps guide policy on homelessness. The Homeless Roundtable supports the County Continuum of Care and the efforts of Baltimore County government in the allocation of public funds to prevent and reduce homelessness in the County. 

Grant funding opportunities are targeted to:

Homeless Services – projects that prevent homelessness or assist those who are currently homeless.

Public Services – projects that address the needs of low-income citizens in the area of employment, crime prevention, child care, health and welfare, education, substance abuse, energy conservation or recreational needs.

Capital Projects – for the removal of architectural barriers for persons with disabilities.

Generally, one-year grants will range in size from $15,000 to $200,000. Applications are due by 2 p.m. February 7, 2017. To learn more, visit http://www.baltimorecountymd.gov/Agencies/planning/grants/index.html


 
 
Revised September 26, 2016