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Keyword: department of health

Lucia Donatelli, MD
Chief, Bureau of Prevention, Protection, and Preparedness
Baltimore County Department of Health

Wear a hat, sunglasses and suncreen to protect your skin.Flip flops, barbecues and trips to the beach are all hallmarks of summer. Visits to the pool, baseball games and camping trips are also on that list. Summer is here and it brings with it all the joys of long sunny days and enjoying time outdoors. While all these things are enjoyed by many, it’s important to stay safe this season. Remembering one word makes summer safety simple. Enjoy yourself, because summer will be gone in a F.L.A.S.H.

 Food Safety

Be sure to wash your hands and all food surfaces. Don't let bacteria spread from one food product to another. This is especially true for raw meat, poultry and seafood. Cook to the recommended temperature and use a food thermometer to measure the internal temperature of foods. Refrigerate food promptly to keep harmful bacteria from growing and multiplying on food.

Lyme Disease

Avoid tick-heavy areas. When outdoors or in the woods, wear insect repellent containing at least 20% DEET. Once coming indoors, immediately remove your clothing and check for ticks. If you find a tick, don't panic. Remove it with fine-tipped tweezers, grasping the tick as close to the surface of the skin as possible and pull up with steady, even pressure until the tick backs out. Afterwards, clean the bite area and your hands with rubbing alcohol or soap and water.

Animal Safety

Provide your pet with ample shade and water. Never leave pets in cars.

Sun Safety

Wear sunscreen, protective clothing, a hat and glasses to protect your skin and eyes. See a dermatologist if you see a change in any moles or freckles. This applies to all skin colors, because skin cancer can happen to anyone.

Heat Precautions

Stay indoors and use air conditioning when the temperatures and humidity are extremely high. Drink plenty of water. Check on elderly friends and neighbors.  

Following these tips will help ensure that you, your family and pets have a safe and healthy summer.


Lucia Donatelli, MD,
 Chief, Bureau of Prevention, Protection, and Preparedness
 Baltimore County Department of Heal
th

With the Olympic Games upon us this summer, people all over the world prepare to celebrate athletic excellence. This year, Rio de Janeiro will carry the torch, but unfortunately the spread of Zika virus in many parts of Central America, South America and the Caribbean may dim the light.

Zap Zika graphicAedes mosquitos can be infected with the Zika virus if they bite a person with it. These infected mosquitos can then spread the virus to other people through bites. Many people who become infected with Zika never know it, while others may experience fever, rash, joint pain, and/or conjunctivitis (red eyes). These symptoms usually last for several days to a week. Even though they are mild and will go away with rest and fluids, pregnant women are at risk of passing it on to their unborn babies.  Zika has been linked to a number of birth defects, including microcephaly (small head due to small brain).

When travelling this season, it’s important to be aware of the areas with active transmission of Zika virus. Even in the continental US, where there is currently no active local Zika transmission by mosquitoes, mosquito control and protection are still extremely important to preventing mosquito bites and breeding opportunities. Mosquitoes can easily reproduce in small amounts of water, especially in containers found in your yard.

In order to prevent the spread of Zika virus, always remember to WRAP UP!

W: Wear long sleeved shirts, pants and hats.

R: Repair damaged doors and windows.

A: Always empty containers that hold water to avoid creating mosquito breeding sites.

P: Protect yourself with an EPA-registered insect repellent.

U: Use condoms or abstain from sexual activity if you are pregnant, or if your partner has been in a Zika infested area.

P: Pregnant women should avoid traveling to areas affected by Zika.

By following these simple steps, we can all do our part to Zap Zika!

To learn more about Zika, attend an upcoming Community Chat at 6 p.m. on June 28 at the Baltimore County Department of Health or get the most up-to-date news on the Center for Disease Control and Prevention website.


group of menGregory Wm. Branch, M.D., MBA, CPE, FACP
Director, Baltimore County Department of Health and Human Services

Let’s be honest. Men are notorious for avoiding the doctor. In fact, women are 100% more likely to seek preventative care than men. Whether its stubbornness, avoidance, or even social reasons, you can’t avoid the fact that men put themselves at high risk by not being proactive about their health. Serious conditions such as high cholesterol and blood pressure don’t have obvious symptoms that can put you at risk for a heart attack or stroke. Also, many cancers don’t present with telltale signs until it’s too late.

Whether you’re a man, or have a man in your life that you care about, odds are a checkup is overdue. The good news is that the Baltimore County Department of Health is offering free help. On June 24 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at two locations: the Woodlawn Health Center and the Eastern Family Resource Center, men ages 18 and older can receive free screenings. No appointment or insurance is necessary.

The following screenings will be offered:

  • Height and weight
  • Blood pressure
  • Glucose
  • Hearing
  • HIV/STI testing
  • Oral cancer
  • Substance abuse

June is Men’s Health Month - a great time to man up, check up, and tune up. Get serious about your health and take advantage of these free screenings. For more information, call 410-887-2705.


 
 

Revised April 6, 2016