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Baltimore County Now

Stay informed of what's happening in Baltimore County.
Keyword: community college of baltimore county

'Reinventing Myself'

image of ACE workshopBaltimore County is leading a national workforce innovation program that is a game changer in connecting job seekers to employers. Baltimore County was awarded this highly competitive $11.8 million grant from the Department of Labor called Accelerating Connections to Employment (ACE).

This four-state, nine-site initiative is demonstrating results here and across the country.   

One of these nine sites is right here at home. Baltimore County is partnering with the Community College of Baltimore County to connect businesses with a steady flow of newly-trained workers for in-demand careers. The County has found that the earlier employers connect with the ACE team, the better their chance of securing quality candidates.

Businesses like WPM Realty are seeing that the ACE Program is an effective way to get involved and fill key job openings. Linda Goldberg, Human Resourse Director at WPM, explains how they’ve used the program to grow their business: “Through ACE, we’ve had incredible success getting qualified job candidates to build our team.” 

Watch The ACE Program video about the amazing talent base Baltimore County has to offer. 

photo from Benjamin Banneker Museum and ParkJordan Fish
Baltimore County Tourism and Promotion

Since 1976 our country has recognized February as Black History Month. You can learn about and celebrate the accomplishments of African Americans throughout our nation’s history by attending any of the great events and activities celebrating Black History Month in Baltimore County.

The Hampton National Historic Site has posted a full schedule of inspiring and significant programs to be presented during Black History Month.

A commemorative exhibit, From Banneker to Douglass: the Quests for Freedom and Equality, will be on display through February 28 at the Benjamin Banneker Historical Park and Museum. Come see original works of art that commemorate the early efforts of Maryland’s African Americans and their allies in their pursuit of freedom and equality for all.

At UMBC, a film screening of “Slavery by Another Name” will be shown on February 2 and 4, and pianist JoyAnne Amani will celebrate the contributions of African Americans with her concert on February 15. A Stirring Song Sung Heroic, an exhibition of 80 black and white photographs by Williams Earle Williams, will be on display in the Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery until March 25.

On February 11, acclaimed public intellectual, best-selling author, and radio host, Michael Eric Dyson will lecture at Towson University as part of their Diversity Speaker Series. Dyson was named by Ebony as one of the 100 Most Influential Black Americans.

Freeman Hrabowski III, the president of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County since 1992, will speak at Goucher College as part of the Robert and Jane Meyerhoff Visiting Professorship Series on February 26. Hrabowski is a prominent educator, advocate, and mathematician who recently was named by President Obama to chair the new Advisory Commission on Educational Excellence for African Americans. Earlier that day CCBC will welcome social justice advocate and attorney Bryan Stevenson as a guest lecturer for the 2015 President’s Distinguished African-American Lecture Series.

On February 28, the Randallstown Community Center is hosting a free event, “In Celebration of Black History Month,” which offers an evening of music and poetry. 

photo of students in college libraryJuliet Morris
Intern, Baltimore County Commission on Arts and Sciences

It’s August which means that the summer season is coming to a close. For many Baltimore County residents, this means the time has finally come to see their victorious Ravens on the field again. For me, August means it is time to buckle up for nine months away at school. Come August 31, I will be making the trek down I-95 to my temporary home at the University of Maryland in College Park.

While I bid “adieu” to the 410 area code, thousands of other students will be pouring into Baltimore County, home to five of the fifteen colleges in the Baltimore metro region.

This includes the Community College of Baltimore County, which educates a whopping 74,000 students each year and accounts for half of all Baltimore County residents who are undergraduates. Towson will once again be bustling with Goucher and Towson students. Owings Mills will be welcoming back Stevenson University scholars and UMBC sweatshirts will be popping up all around Catonsville.

Many college graduates call Baltimore County home. With great proximity to Baltimore City and Washington D.C., what college grad wouldn’t want to live here? The Baltimore-Towson area landed a spot on The Atlantic’s 25 Best Places to Live for Recent Graduates in 2012. It isn’t just recent graduates that are drawn to Baltimore County. An impressive 35.2% of county residents over the age of 25 have a bachelor’s degree or higher. 

Baltimore County Public Schools excels in preparing students for college. According to a recent study in Education Week, BCPS has the second-highest graduation rate among the nation’s fifty-largest school districts. Additionally, 52% of Baltimore County traditional and magnet high schools earned a place on national “Best Schools” lists. Many of these impressive graduates will be making their college debut this fall.

Here are a few words of advice for the soon-to-be college freshmen. As a rising sophomore, I am well-versed in surviving the back-to-school chaos. These three tips will help you start on the right foot this school year.

  • Join the Facebook group.

Social media has revolutionized college orientation. Students are now getting acquainted with their fellow classmates in school-specific “class of 2017” groups. Students have the opportunity to get to know floor mates, ask for advice, and even find a roommate.

  • Know what not to buy.

Before you go and buy tons of fun décor for your room, keep in mind the amount of space that you have. I am only packing half of what I brought last year! Consider making another shopping trip after move-in day so you don’t overbuy.

  • Don’t run right to the bookstore.

The cost of textbooks adds up quickly, but a couple strategies can help to cut the cost. Try comparing prices. You might even want to wait until after the first week of classes to buy books. There could be a more cost-effective online book, or you might not even need the book at all.

Remember this August that Baltimore County is more than Ravens nation. It is home to an impressive network of colleges and universities and a central hub for the countless college students who will attend them this fall. And, for me and thousands of others travelling beyond the county borders, Baltimore County will always be home.

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