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Baltimore County Now

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Keyword: bureau of utilities

Overnight water outage will affect some water customers in zip codes 21093, 21204, 21208, 21209 and 21211

The Baltimore County Department of Public Works has received notice from Baltimore City regarding emergency water outages that will begin at 9 p.m. tonight. The outages will affect the following Baltimore County ZIP codes: 21093, 21204, 21208, 21209. Please read the City's press release for more information.


A sanitary sewer overflow was reported to the Department of Public Works yesterday, June 25, at 12:46 p.m. along a tributary to White Marsh Run, near Cordon Way (east of Honeygo Boulevard) in White Marsh. Baltimore County utility crews responded to the site, repaired a damaged 12-inch diameter sewer pipe and stopped the flow by 3:50 p.m. yesterday.

The overflow has been estimated at 72,000 gallons, based on information that it appeared June 19 but was not reported to Baltimore County at that time. (The public is asked to report any overflow to Baltimore County’s Bureau of Utilities: 410 887-5210 or to 911.) The overflow was caused by a concrete casement (or pipe lining) located along the tributary which, due to erosion, slipped and damaged the sewer line. Crews replaced 17 feet of pipe.

Although recent heavy rains have mitigated the impact, the public is advised to avoid contact with the water in the affected area. The Baltimore County Department of Health will monitor water quality at the sites and issue water contact advisories if necessary on the County website.


Cease the Grease logo imageChris Korpman, Engineer III
Baltimore County Public Works

There is FOG in the sewers –but it’s not that misty stuff that fills the air.  The term “F.O.G.” stands for fats, oils and grease. Originating in our kitchens, it clogs sanitary sewer systems across Baltimore County and is a harmful threat to the environment. When poured or washed down the drain, FOG builds up on pipe walls, restricting the flow of wastewater exiting our home’s plumbing.

Over time, FOG leads to blockages that result in overflows into our homes or onto our streets, down storm drains, and into local waterways, all posing a serious risk to public health. 

The 10 most common sources of FOG are:

  • Shortening
  • Cooking Oil
  • Fat trimmings
  • Sauces
  • Margarine
  • Butter and Lard
  • Baking Goods
  • Dairy Products
  • Meats
  • Food Scraps

Put Fats, oil and grease where they belong…

Never pour F.O.G. into your sink or toilet. Rather, dispose of F.O.G. into a small can, storing in the freezer until full. When it’s full, throw it into the trash.

When there is F.O.G. residue in a pan or on a dish, wipe it with a paper towel before washing and throw the towel in the trash.

Place a strainer in the kitchen sink drain to catch food scraps and other solids, then empty the strainer into the trash.

Please keep this in mind during your holidays and remember, "Cease the Grease."


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