Skip Navigation

Image of the Baltimore County Historic Courthouse

Baltimore County News

Stay informed of what's happening in Baltimore County.
Date: Jul 2017

Award Highlights Innovation and Streamlining of Government Services

Baltimore County is ranked among the top five most tech-savvy mid-sized county governments in the nation, according to the Center for Digital Government’s 15th annual 2017 Digital Counties Survey in conjunction with the National Association of Counties (NACo).

Among the counties that participated, Baltimore County earned the fourth place ranking in the category for counties with populations from 500,000 to 999,000. The award recognizes counties considered to be “digital leaders” in terms of aligning technology initiatives with strategic priorities to provide significant cost savings and administrative efficiencies.

“We are very proud to be recognized for our success in making the most of technology to maximize efficiencies in a way that helps us enhance public safety, improve our schools, and better serve our citizens,” said County Executive Kevin Kamenetz. “I appreciate the outstanding efforts of our talented technology staff here at the County,” said Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz.

Improving Government Services through Technology

This year, the survey identifies the best technology practices among U.S. counties, including initiatives that streamline delivery of government services. Some highlights of the survey’s criteria include practices that encourage collaboration and shared services, enhance cybersecurity and reduce carbon emissions.

Baltimore County was honored as a top-ranked county at the 2017 Digital Counties Survey Awards Reception during NACo’s Annual Conference & Exposition in Columbus, Ohio on July 22, and received the Digital Counties Survey Award. Additionally, winners will be featured in the Center’s best practices and thought leadership white papers.

About the Digital Counties Survey

The Digital Counties Survey is hosted by the Center for Digital Government, a national research and advisory institute on information technology policies and best practices in state and local government. The organization also provides government, education and industry leaders with decision support, research and educational services to help them effectively incorporate new technologies in the 21st century. This survey is conducted in partnership with the National Association of Counties (NACo), a full-service organization that provides legislative, research, technical, and public affairs assistance to county governments.


Program and Special Recognition Includes Free Movie Screening 

Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz is hosting a tribute to Henrietta Lacks next Saturday, July 29, in the Turner Station neighborhood where she lived. The program celebrates her legacy and will include a special and rare honor from the County Executive, as well as remarks from community leaders and a free screening of the movie, “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks,” starring Oprah Winfrey.

The program, which will take place at the Fleming Community Center, located at 641 Main Street in Turner Station, begins at 10 a.m. and includes refreshments. The public is welcome to attend.

Sponsoring groups include the Lacks Family, Henrietta Lacks House of Healing, Henrietta Lacks Legacy Group, Turner Station Conservation Teams, Fleming Senior Center Council, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Dr. William Wade’s family, Baltimore County Department of Aging, Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science, The Kingdom Economic System and Turner Station Heritage Foundation Committee. Media sponsors for the event include Radio One and the Afro-American Newspaper.

Henrietta Lacks has been called by some “the most important woman in medical history,”  despite the lack of recognition while she was alive. An African-American Dundalk resident who lived in Turner Station, Henrietta Lacks was the unwitting source of an immortalized line of cells that will reproduce indefinitely and continues to be a source of invaluable medical data today. Her cells were used to test the polio vaccine, were a basis for cloning and in vitro fertilization and are helping to develop anti-cancer drug therapies.


Engineers Will Discuss Upcoming Storm Drains Project

Baltimore County’s Department of Public Works will discuss local drainage improvements to Barton Oaks Road, Overbrook Road, Crossland Road and Fairway Road in the Dumbarton area as well as rehabilitation of existing culverts running beneath Barton Oaks Road, Overbrook Road, and Fairway Road (all near the Suburban Club of Baltimore County).

To keep residents of this historic neighborhood abreast of design and construction discussions, County Engineers will hold a workshop on Wednesday, August 16 between 5:30 and 7:00 p.m. at the Pikesville Branch of the Baltimore County Public Library, 1301 Reisterstown Road in Pikesville.

During the meeting, residents will have an opportunity to discuss the project’s impact with engineers in an informal setting. For more information, contact James Ekeh, Project Engineer, or Sheldon Epstein, Section Chief, Bureau of Engineering at 410 887-3711.


 
 
Revised September 26, 2016