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Speed Cameras

Baltimore County uses speed cameras to encourage motorists to slow down in school zones where traffic data and citizen complaints show that speeding is a problem.

The use of speed cameras in Maryland - called the Safe Speed Automated Enforcement Program - was authorized by the Maryland General Assembly under Maryland Transportation Article 21-809. The Baltimore County Council passed legislation, Baltimore County-Bill 61-09, in 2009 authorizing the use of 15 speed cameras in school zones. In 2011, the Baltimore County Council amended this legislation (Bill 1-11 PDF) to allow additional cameras.

Police Chief James Johnson supports speed cameras for one reason: Public Safety. Every day, citizens demand safe streets in Baltimore County, especially for the benefit of children. Speed cameras are an effective tool for slowing motorists.

Speed Camera Locations

Safe Speed logo.

Speed cameras are installed or in the process of being installed at the following schools:

Elementary Schools

  • Church Lane Elementary, 8600 block of Allenswood Road
  • Dogwood Elementary, 7200 block of Dogwood Road
  • Dundalk Elementary, 7000 block of Dunmanway
  • Fort Garrison Elementary, 3300 block of Woodvalley Drive
  • Halstead Academy, 7500 block of Hillsway Road
  • Johnnycake Elementary, 5900 block of Craigmont Road
  • Joppa View Elementary, 8700 block of Honeygo Boulevard
  • Owings Mills Elementary, 10800 block of Reisterstown Road
  • Padonia Elementary, 9800 block of Greenside Drive
  • Riderwood Elementary, 8100 block of Thornton Road
  • Rodgers Forge Elementary, 200 block of Stevenson Lane
  • Seven Oaks Elementary, 9200 block of Seven Courts Drive
  • Stoneleigh Elementary, 800 block of Regester Avenue and 700 block of Stevenson Lane
  • Vincent Farm Elementary, 6000 block of Ebenezer Road
  • Wellwood International, 2900 block of Smith Avenue
  • Westchester Elementary, 2300 block of Old Frederick Road
  • Winand Elementary, 8300 block of Scotts Level Road
  • Woodmoor Elementary, 3000 block of Essex Road

Middle Schools

  • Arbutus Middle, 1200 block of Sulphur Spring Road
  • Deer Park Middle, 9800 block of Winands Road
  • Dundalk Middle, 7000 block of Dunmanway
  • Lansdowne Middle, 2200 block of Lansdowne Road
  • Loch Raven Academy, 700 block of Goucher Boulevard
  • Middle River Middle, 800 block of Middle River Road
  • Old Court Middle, 4600 block of Old Court Road
  • Pikesville Middle, 7700 block of Seven Mile Lane
  • Dumbarton Middle, 200 block of Stevenson Lane
  • Southwest Academy, 6100 block of Johnnycake Road
  • Stemmers Run Middle, 200 block of Stemmers Run Road
  • Windsor Mill Middle, 8200 block of Windsor Mill Road
  • Woodlawn Middle, 3000 block of Essex Road

High Schools

  • Catonsville High, 400 block of South Rolling Road and 500 block of South Rolling Road
  • Carver Center for the Arts, 500 block of Kenilworth Drive
  • Dulaney High, 200 block of Padonia Road
  • Dundalk High, 1900 block of Delvale Road
  • Eastern Technical High, 1100 block of Mace Avenue
  • Lansdowne High, 3900 Hollins Ferry Road
  • Loch Raven High, 1600 block of Cromwell Bridge Road
  • Milford Mill Academy, 3800 block of Washington Avenue
  • Parkville High, 2600 block of Putty Hill Avenue
  • Patapsco High, 8100 block of Wise Avenue
  • Perry Hall High, 4600 block of Ebenezer Road
  • Sparrows Point High, 7400 block of North Point Road
  • Woodlawn High,1800 block of Woodlawn Drive

Private Schools

  • Bais Yaakov, 6300 block of Smith Avenue
  • Garrison Forest School, 300 block of Garrison Forest Road
  • Mt. Carmel, 1700 block of Old Eastern Avenue
  • Mt. DeSales Academy, 700 block of Academy Road

Cameras may be added or moved at the discretion of the Police Chief based on a review of traffic data, citizen complaints and a location's accident history. All speed camera zones are marked with signage.

Hours of Operation

In compliance with state law, Baltimore County's speed cameras operate Monday through Friday between the hours of 6 a.m. and 8 p.m.

Speed cameras remain in use during these hours throughout the summer months and on other weekdays when school is not in session. The need for motorists to drive carefully in school zones exists even when schools are not in session because school sites are used for summer school, recreation and parks activities, summer athletics and other child-oriented activities.

Warnings and Citations

During the first 30 days after a camera is activated, motorists exceeding the speed limit by at least 12 mph will receive warnings rather than citations.

After a speed camera has been in place for 30 days, citations will be issued to motorists traveling at least 12 mph over the speed limit.

Tickets generated by speed camera violations carry a $40 fine; no license points are assigned because these are civil violations. Vehicle insurance providers are not notified of speed camera citations. You may pay online, in person or by mail; the options are included on the violation notice.

Vehicle owners may contest speed camera fines in Maryland District Court. Details about how to appeal are included on each violation notice. If you wish to contest a citation because you were not driving the vehicle when the violation occurred, you must provide a signed affidavit stating that you were not operating the vehicle at the time of the violation and provide corroborating evidence, such as the name, address and, if possible, the driver's license identification number of the person who was driving.  This must be done within 30 days of the mail date of the citation.

If you believe your citation was issued in error, you can request in writing to have your citation reviewed by Baltimore County's Speed Camera Ombudsman Program. Upon review, your citation will either be upheld or voided.

If you contest your ticket in court, you will be presented with photographs of the violation. You will have the opportunity to present to the court any information that challenges or mitigates the violation, just as you would for a speeding ticket issued by a police officer. After reviewing all of the evidence, the court will make a decision.

Failure to respond to the ticket can result in additional fees and penalties.

Maryland law requires that revenue from speed camera fines be used for public safety programs.

Revised September 3, 2014

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