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Maryland Legal Research

A number of legal resources for Maryland are available on the Internet such as: the current Maryland statutes, regulations and Appellate Courts decisions. The purpose of this resource guide is to quickly lead researchers to those sources. However, it is not an exhaustive list of all resources available, and it is not meant as legal advice. The Law Library is not responsible for this information or the utilization thereof. For further assistance it would be best to consult an attorney.

Maryland Statutes and Regulations

Statutes: The current Maryland Code online may be accessed through the Maryland State Law Library's Gateway to Maryland Laws page. The Maryland laws are usually available via several sources. Typically the two major publishers of legal information, West and Lexis, offer their versions of the law.  Meanwhile, a link to the Maryland code from the Maryland General Assembly is always offered. The text of the Code should be the same from each publisher.  The main differences are in how the Code is presented, the interface, and the search capabilities. Try each version to determine which you prefer.

Bills: The Maryland General Assembly provides access to bills from 1996 to the present. Bills can be searched in a variety of ways including subject matter and bill number. Access to current session bills and general session information may be found via the General Assembly's home page. Bills from prior session bills may be found by searching the Legislation by Session page. Make sure to change the session year near the bottom of the search form to search the desired year.

COMAR – Code of Maryland Regulations: The Secretary of State's Division of State Documents provides access to COMAR online. Please note: "[t]he contents of the Maryland Register and the Code of Maryland Regulations shall be judicially noticed from the official text of those publications." (Courts and Judicial Proceedings Article, §10-203(a)(2), Code of Maryland.)

Maryland Register: The Division of State Documents also provides online access to the Maryland Register. The Register is published every two weeks, and the nine most recent issues can be viewed online.

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Executive Branch

Governor: The Governor's website links to various gubernatorial documents:

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Legislative Branch

State Legislature: The main website for the Maryland General Assembly www.mlis.state.md.us/ contains links to legislators, statutes, bills, and many other resources including budget information, hearing schedules, and dates of interest for the session.

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Judicial Branch

Maryland Judiciary: www.mdcourts.gov/  
This site contains a wealth of legal information including Court Opinions, case law and legal forms.

*Court Forms: Select Family Law and District Court forms are available at www.mdcourts.gov/courtforms/index.html

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Miscellaneous Resources

Avalon Project: This Yale Law School project at www.yale.edu/lawweb/avalon/ provides easy to read major legal, historical, and diplomatic American documents. Among the documents you can find here are the Charter for the province of Maryland as well as the Constitution of the state of Maryland.

State of Maryland Site: The Maryland state website is www.maryland.gov/. From this site you can access internet resources for all three branches of state government as well as state agencies, local governments, and state business and education material.

Maryland Manual: This continuously updated guide to the Maryland government available at www.mdmanual.net/ shows the organizational structure of the state government. It also presents information about the three branches of state government including statistics on Maryland and the local communities. It includes biographies of Maryland officials and it publishes state history information. It's offered by the Maryland State Archives, www.mdarchives.state.md.us/

Office of the Attorney General: www.oag.state.md.us/ which has some AG opinions as well as information on a number of other interesting legal topics.

Maryland State Archives: www.msa.md.gov/ has links to the Maryland Manual and historical records and information which may be of interest to the legal researcher.

Maryland Provincial and Early Statehood Law: The Maryland State Archives offers electronic editions of the earliest Maryland laws on their website aomol.net/html/index.html. Please note, that while this is an invaluable resource for historical documents, it is not always easy to navigate or to read. While some documents have been converted to standard typeface, many are only available via scanned microfilm copies of varying quality. Aside from the provincial charter you can also read the earliest laws past by the legislature among other documents.

Maryland Constitution: The full-text of the state constitution is also available from the State Archives at www.mdarchives.state.md.us/msa/mdmanual/43const/html/const.html.  

Maryland State Bar Association: www.msba.org/
The state's legal professional organization contains information for the general public via their "Public Resources" page www.msba.org/public/index.htm.

Women's Law Center: www.wlcmd.org/
This site provides some information on law and how it relates to women and families. It has a section specifically on Domestic Violence that may be helpful to non-lawyers.

People's Law Library: www.peoples-law.org/ 
This site provides "legal and self-help information on Maryland and federal law affecting low and moderate income persons and their families." This is a good first stop for non-lawyers with legal questions.

University of Baltimore School of Law: law.ubalt.edu/

Law Library: law.ubalt.edu/lawlib/index.html

University of Maryland School of Law: www.law.umaryland.edu/

Thurgood Marshall Law Library: www.law.umaryland.edu/marshall/

Code Lynx – Maryland Codes Administration online: mdcodes.umbc.edu/ “Code Lynx contains building, fire and other codes information for the State of Maryland and includes information from those local jurisdictions that adopt and enforce these codes. There are links to related federal government agencies for the accessibility code, the energy code and the HUD Manufactured Home program.”

Revised March 23, 2015

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